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Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

loucypher
December 23, 2012 04:03PM

Registered: 5 years ago
Posts: 275

Quote
rotorhead
Quote
loucypher
Adding "Under God"? It was always there as far as I can remember. Some where at some point it was taken out because "god" should not be in public schools. Can't remember when. But it was always there. It was around the same time some A-Holes decided it was o.k. to burn the flag.

Under God was added in 1954.
[en.wikipedia.org]


Sorry RH. Thought you meant it was way more recent.happy

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
December 23, 2012 10:25PM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

Quote
Home_Despot
Evolution is a bunch of BS...laughable in its silly attempts to explain what God has obviously created.

What happened??? Did we STOP evolving?? is this the highest state to be attained by us earthly creatures??
HOW DID PLANTS EVOLVE????
wHERE DID THE INITIAL SPARK OF INTELLIGENCE COME FROM TO TELL A BLADE OF GRASS HOW TO PRODUCE CHLOROPHYLL FROM SUNLIGHT?

Evolution Is Not Happening Now

First of all, the lack of a case for evolution is clear from the fact that no one has ever seen it happen. If it were a real process, evolution should still be occurring, and there should be many "transitional" forms that we could observe. What we see instead, of course, is an array of distinct "kinds" of plants and animals with many varieties within each kind, but with very clear and -- apparently -- unbridgeable gaps between the kinds. That is, for example, there are many varieties of dogs and many varieties of cats, but no "dats" or "cogs." Such variation is often called microevolution, and these minor horizontal (or downward) changes occur fairly often, but such changes are not true "vertical" evolution.

Evolutionary geneticists have often experimented on fruit flies and other rapidly reproducing species to induce mutational changes hoping they would lead to new and better species, but these have all failed to accomplish their goal. No truly new species has ever been produced, let alone a new "basic kind."

A current leading evolutionist, Jeffrey Schwartz, professor of anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh, has recently acknowledged that:

. . . it was and still is the case that, with the exception of Dobzhansky's claim about a new species of fruit fly, the formation of a new species, by any mechanism, has never been observed.1

From the National Academy of Sciences
In science, a "fact" typically refers to an observation, measurement, or other form of evidence that can be expected to occur the same way under similar circumstances. However, scientists also use the term "fact" to refer to a scientific explanation that has been tested and confirmed so many times that there is no longer a compelling reason to keep testing it or looking for additional examples. In that respect, the past and continuing occurrence of evolution is a scientific fact. Because the evidence supporting it is so strong, scientists no longer question whether biological evolution has occurred and is continuing to occur. Instead, they investigate the mechanisms of evolution, how rapidly evolution can take place, and related questions.
[www.nationalacademies.org]



Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

Home_Despot
December 24, 2012 08:26AM

Registered: 5 years ago
Posts: 52

Quote
rotorhead
Quote
Home_Despot
Evolution is a bunch of BS...laughable in its silly attempts to explain what God has obviously created.

What happened??? Did we STOP evolving?? is this the highest state to be attained by us earthly creatures??
HOW DID PLANTS EVOLVE????
wHERE DID THE INITIAL SPARK OF INTELLIGENCE COME FROM TO TELL A BLADE OF GRASS HOW TO PRODUCE CHLOROPHYLL FROM SUNLIGHT?

Evolution Is Not Happening Now

First of all, the lack of a case for evolution is clear from the fact that no one has ever seen it happen. If it were a real process, evolution should still be occurring, and there should be many "transitional" forms that we could observe. What we see instead, of course, is an array of distinct "kinds" of plants and animals with many varieties within each kind, but with very clear and -- apparently -- unbridgeable gaps between the kinds. That is, for example, there are many varieties of dogs and many varieties of cats, but no "dats" or "cogs." Such variation is often called microevolution, and these minor horizontal (or downward) changes occur fairly often, but such changes are not true "vertical" evolution.

Evolutionary geneticists have often experimented on fruit flies and other rapidly reproducing species to induce mutational changes hoping they would lead to new and better species, but these have all failed to accomplish their goal. No truly new species has ever been produced, let alone a new "basic kind."

A current leading evolutionist, Jeffrey Schwartz, professor of anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh, has recently acknowledged that:

. . . it was and still is the case that, with the exception of Dobzhansky's claim about a new species of fruit fly, the formation of a new species, by any mechanism, has never been observed.1

From the National Academy of Sciences
In science, a "fact" typically refers to an observation, measurement, or other form of evidence that can be expected to occur the same way under similar circumstances. However, scientists also use the term "fact" to refer to a scientific explanation that has been tested and confirmed so many times that there is no longer a compelling reason to keep testing it or looking for additional examples. In that respect, the past and continuing occurrence of evolution is a scientific fact. Because the evidence supporting it is so strong, scientists no longer question whether biological evolution has occurred and is continuing to occur. Instead, they investigate the mechanisms of evolution, how rapidly evolution can take place, and related questions.
[www.nationalacademies.org]



Utter and pure nonsense.

Name one piece of biological evidence that indicates that humans, for example, are evolving...should be easy, we have scads of information on humans.

If anything, we would seem to be de-volving into something more stupid, as we continue to kill off ourselves and the planet we live on...and calling it progress.

A medical examiner of today would have no trouble dissecting and identifying each component of a human from 100,000 years ago...nothing has changed.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

aussie
December 24, 2012 09:24AM

Registered: 10 years ago
Posts: 876

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

dougtamjj
December 24, 2012 02:01PM

Registered: 10 years ago
Posts: 2,527

That was great Aussie. I watched the whole thing.

I love our family. Our family is huge, huge, huge, and as diverse as the world. We have Christians, Jews, Wiccans, Celts, Native Americans, Atheists and Agnostics. Some are scientist, engineers, high school graduates, mensa and common laborers. All with vastly different beliefs. We all love each other and never ever make fun of or look down each other for our individual beliefs.

My Father was a Baptist minister, my brother a minister, my mother Catholic. Two of my greatest teachers in life were my non Christian Celtic great grandmother, and my non Christian Cherokee great grandmother. I grew up hearing stories of fairies, the great spirit, god, animal spirits, Noah, Jesus, Mary and Joseph. I pass all those stories on to all the children in the family.

What do I believe? I believe in life and living well. As I type this my 9 year old son is telling me how we are descended from apes and how much of our DNA we share with orangutans. Last night we were debating time travel and the possibility of life in other galaxies. So very cool!

Tonight our huge family will gather together. Some will go to their various churches, some will form little groups and discuss the state of the nation and fiscal cliff. The children will scream, run, and tear through the house like little tasmanian devils. Then we will eat Christmas dinner, Christmas cookies and open Christmas presents.

I have no scientific evidence of the existence of the love we have for each other but I feel it and I believe it.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

noOne
December 24, 2012 02:14PM

Registered: 7 years ago
Posts: 1,495

I have a large family too - 28 cousins with 9 blood aunts/uncles. I don't know how many kids my cousins have, but it is a lot. with a lot of racial and religious diversity.

Happy Holidays!

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
December 24, 2012 04:27PM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

Great Video. Gaaaaaawwwwwdddd!





To get your personal pwayer package.





You can find Pastor Kerney on BET late night.

And don't forget god needs your $$$.

To get your Jesus Handkerchief


Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

dougtamjj
December 24, 2012 04:57PM

Registered: 10 years ago
Posts: 2,527

Sooooo funny!!!!!!! When I was a little girl my father was a professional gospel singer. We would travel around the country on his gospel quartets big bus and go to singings and churches everywhere.

Daddy was very strict and we were not allowed to dance and even jiminey cricket was a bad word. When Daddy was away Mom would break out the beatles album and we would dance like crazy until his car pulled into the driveway.

One time he was invited to sing at a black church and of course we went along. My brother and I had never seen such wonderful excitement. We started dancing, yelling, speaking in tongues and I am quite sure I was slain in the spirit of the lord. To this day I cannot pass a black church on Sunday morning and not want to go inside. Makes me want to dance. My second favorite church we went to was the snake handlers church. Scared my mother to death. Great fun for us kids.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
December 24, 2012 06:22PM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

Quote
dougtamjj
My second favorite church we went to was the snake handlers church. Scared my mother to death. Great fun for us kids.






I might have actually been to this church. When I was in college in Knoxville, TN I attended several Pentecostal Churches which used snakes.


Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

dougtamjj
December 25, 2012 12:23AM

Registered: 10 years ago
Posts: 2,527

Roto, Sigh! For some childhood was really rough. For some not so much. My life could have been rough but for some reason at a very young age I refused to become a victim. I don't know why or how. Sometimes you just have to move on. Happy spaghetti monster or pasta whatever to you. I wish you well. Happy New Year!

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

Bombi
December 25, 2012 06:59AM

Registered: 10 years ago
Posts: 2,088

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

noOne
December 27, 2012 10:28PM

Registered: 7 years ago
Posts: 1,495

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

Jamison
December 28, 2012 01:28AM

Registered: 6 years ago
Posts: 1,037

One ^ that's pathetic, two, not believing in evolution is funny to me. That can't be real.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
December 28, 2012 03:52AM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

Quote
Jamison
One ^ that's pathetic, two, not believing in evolution is funny to me. That can't be real.

The United States is terribly undereducated when it comes to science.

"According to an August 2006 survey by the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life and the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, 63 percent of Americans believe that humans and other living things have either always existed in their present form or have evolved over time under the guidance of a supreme being. Only 26 percent say that life evolved solely through processes such as natural selection. A similar Pew Research Center poll, released in August 2005, found that 64 percent of Americans support teaching creationism alongside evolution in the classroom."
[www.pewforum.org]

"We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology." - Carl Sagan

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
December 28, 2012 03:59PM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

This is a great opinion piece by evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne.

"Science and faith are fundamentally incompatible, and for precisely the same reason that irrationality and rationality are incompatible. They are different forms of inquiry, with only one, science, equipped to find real truth. And while they may have a dialogue, it's not a constructive one. Science helps religion only by disproving its claims, while religion has nothing to add to science."
[usatoday30.usatoday.com]

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
December 31, 2012 12:11AM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
January 25, 2013 03:14PM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

The rise of Atheism.
[www.psychologytoday.com]

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
February 01, 2013 02:52PM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

Why should religious groups be given special accommodations? Our president is going to allow religious groups to opt out of the requirement to provide contraceptives to employees. What if an atheist didn't agree with the requirement to provide contraceptives to his employees based on his personal philosophy? Just because his orders are not coming from an imaginary sky wizard is he any less deserving to make the choices for his business?

[www.foxnews.com]

I see many lawsuits in the future because of poorly thought out regulations.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

iguanabanana
February 01, 2013 11:58PM

Registered: 4 years ago
Posts: 72

Quote
rotorhead
Why should religious groups be given special accommodations? Our president is going to allow religious groups to opt out of the requirement to provide contraceptives to employees. What if an atheist didn't agree with the requirement to provide contraceptives to his employees based on his personal philosophy? Just because his orders are not coming from an imaginary sky wizard is he any less deserving to make the choices for his business?

[www.foxnews.com]

I see many lawsuits in the future because of poorly thought out regulations.

Whoa. First of all, quit giving athiests a bad name by being so fundamentalist about it, roto. Your hypotheticals make no sense. It appears you follow Ayn Rand quite religiously, so be upfront about your beliefs! You keep trying to resurect this thread, not sure why... let her die a peaceful death, wont cha? Peace. Edited to say: speaking as an atheist, I find that YOU are offensive.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 02/02/2013 12:13AM by iguanabanana.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
February 02, 2013 12:58AM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

Quote
iguanabanana
Whoa. First of all, quit giving athiests a bad name by being so fundamentalist about it, roto. Your hypotheticals make no sense. It appears you follow Ayn Rand quite religiously, so be upfront about your beliefs! You keep trying to resurect this thread, not sure why... let her die a peaceful death, wont cha? Peace. Edited to say: speaking as an atheist, I find that YOU are offensive.

This is one of the stupidest responses that I have ever read. First of all there is no such thing as a fundamentalist atheist. Since atheism does not contain a set of beliefs to adhere to there is nothing to be fundamentalist about. The only common thing about atheism is that we don't believe in a god or gods. The term makes no sense and is most often used by theists to compare people like Dawkins or Hitchens to religious fundamentalists.

I have never read anything by Ayn Rand in my life so you are obviously misinformed. I have read Dawkins and Hitchens and Harris among others. They all encourage militant atheism, i.e. being outspoken about atheism and encouraging other atheists to do the same. I posted Dawkins' TEDTalk video on this subject earlier in this thread.

If I want to post in this thread I will do so. Unless of course you are the moderator in which case just close the thread. Otherwise buzz off!
If you have a problem understanding my "hypotheticals" then just point out which ones make no sense and I will be happy to explain them to you.

You are obviously a troll, so troll away. I don't find you offensive just idiotic! If you don't like what I post then don't read it.

P.S. You misspelled Atheists and resurrect. Most atheists that I know are able to use the spell checker on this forum. lol

Edited to add: I am a member of the farcical Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster. You know, meatballs and noodles, beer volcanoes, stripper factories and the decline in the number of pirates being the cause of global warming. Maybe I am a fundamentalist Pastafarian!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/02/2013 01:16AM by rotorhead.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

iguanabanana
February 02, 2013 01:22AM

Registered: 4 years ago
Posts: 72

Quote
rotorhead
This is one of the stupidest responses that I have ever read. First of all there is no such thing as a fundamentalist atheist. Since atheism does not contain a set of beliefs ....

If I want to post in this thread I will do so. Unless of course you are the moderator in which case just close the thread. Otherwise buzz off!
If you have a problem understanding my "hypotheticals" then just point out which ones make no sense .....
You are obviously a troll, so troll away. I don't find you offensive just idiotic! If you don't like what I post then don't read it.

P.S. You misspelled Atheists and resurrect. Most atheists that I know are able to use the spell checker on this forum. lol

Buzzing off, then. [ Except, edited to note you are a total DOUCHEBAG] Check out candyfloss on internetinfidels. Wanna tangle? Meet me there, then. And I call BS on your Ayn Rand denying BS (given your other posts, give me a break teabilly).



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 02/02/2013 01:48AM by iguanabanana.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
February 02, 2013 03:19AM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

Quote
iguanabanana
Buzzing off, then. [ Except, edited to note you are a total DOUCHEBAG] Check out candyfloss on internetinfidels. Wanna tangle? Meet me there, then. And I call BS on your Ayn Rand denying BS (given your other posts, give me a break teabilly).

DOUCHEBAG - From Urban Dictionary
Someone who has surpassed the levels of jerk and asshole, however not yet reached @#$%& or @#$%&. Not to be confused with douche.
You are entitled to your opinion.

teabilly - From Urban Dictionary
A member or follower of the Tea Party movement who displays a lack of sophistication.
Nope not Tea Party. Libertarian.

BS - From Urban Dictionary
bull @#$%&, duh , it is said when someone tells a lie
Just the truth and nothing but the truth so help me DOG.

name-calling - From World English Dictionary
verbal abuse, esp as a crude form of argument.

I have never read Ayn Rand. Why would I lie? I would not be ashamed of it if I had. But I haven't. I do have The Fountainhead on my bookshelf but haven't gotten around to reading it yet. I guess that is like most Christians with their Bibles, so maybe I do follow her religiously????



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/02/2013 03:21AM by rotorhead.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
February 04, 2013 05:26PM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

The March 2012 Gallup poll on religious behavior in the United States exposes how lots of people are avoiding church. As Gallup reports, "32 percent of Americans are nonreligious, based on their statement that religion is not an important part of their daily life and that they seldom or never attend religious services."

A bare majority of Americans are not connected with any religious congregation, and an even larger majority are hardly ever showing up in any house of worship. There's plenty of other sorts of religious activities and spiritual experiences to pursue, of course. Abandoning church is not the same thing as leaving the religious life. All the same, church-goers have become a minority in America.
[www.huffingtonpost.com]

This "church" is fighting back by appealing to the younger crowd.

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others
avatar

rotorhead
February 07, 2013 02:40PM

Registered: 12 years ago
Posts: 2,440

Should these men be respected for their moral authority?
[bishop-accountability.org]

The biggest CON in human history!
[vaticanvalues.wordpress.com]

Why do people still support this organization?
Do you know how much money the church has spent defending pedophile priests?
Where does this money come from?

[en.wikipedia.org]
[www.rickross.com]
[www.smh.com.au]
[www.huffingtonpost.com]
[disabledaccessdenied.wordpress.com]

What do you think of Mother Teresa? A Saint?
[www.sfweekly.com]

The Catholic Church produces a lot of fine Pedophiles! Support SNAP instead of "the church"! Help do real good not fake good!
[www.snapnetwork.org]

Re: Respecting the beliefs of others

noOne
February 07, 2013 09:28PM

Registered: 7 years ago
Posts: 1,495

Mother Teresa was not a saint. She thought people would be brought closer to God through their suffering, so did not allow things like pain killers in her hospices.

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