All-Time Record Hea...
 

All-Time Record Heat in the Caribbean  

 

islandjoan
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September 17, 2015 1:05 pm  

I found an interesting article on Jeff Masters' blog on wunderground that mentions on September 10 it was 96 degrees(!!) in Charlotte Amalie - an all time high for the station and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Record heat and drought has been widespread over the Caribbean this summer. The atmospheric circulation associated with the strong El Niño event in the Eastern Pacific has brought warm, sinking air and high pressure to the Caribbean, and has contributed to many cities recording their all-time highest temperatures on record.

Here is the link to the full article:
wunderground article


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ms411
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September 17, 2015 1:14 pm  

Probably because they keep cutting down all the shade trees and only planting useless palm trees. We need more shade!


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watruw8ing4
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September 17, 2015 5:21 pm  

Probably because they keep cutting down all the shade trees and only planting useless palm trees. We need more shade!

Well, I don't agree that that is the reason. But I do agree that we could definitely use more shade trees around here.


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OldTart
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September 17, 2015 7:26 pm  

Probably because they keep cutting down all the shade trees and only planting useless palm trees. We need more shade!

That definitely qualifies as my "Laugh Of The Month", will be a real contender for the yearly tally and may even be an all-timer. :@)


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wanderer
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September 17, 2015 8:57 pm  

My solution is to build a big beautiful wall, to block the hot air coming from the Eastern Pacific. To deal with the high atmospheric pressure, I'd suggest building an air sucking factory. The sucked air can then used to fill the scuba diving equipment. While we are on the topic of smart solutions, I also have one for crime: build bomb shelters!


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Alana33
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September 17, 2015 9:08 pm  

Have another toke!


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ms411
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September 17, 2015 9:41 pm  

Study palm trees vs other trees.

http://www.citylab.com/cityfixer/2011/12/problem-palm-trees/748/


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speee1dy
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September 17, 2015 11:05 pm  

Thanks for posting that ms411

I know that people like to have trees around their house for the shade and it keeps the houses cooler


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Spartygrad95
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September 17, 2015 11:30 pm  

Maybe we can genetically modify ficus trees to grow into troposphere and block more sunlight.


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Alana33
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September 17, 2015 11:33 pm  

Ficus trees, like Rubber trees, while beautiful, are water hogs.
Don't plant near house/cistern. They will find a way in.


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Spartygrad95
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September 18, 2015 12:07 am  

Oh. I know. Was going by website ms411 cited. Strangler figs have no place near a home


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STXjill
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September 18, 2015 1:25 am  

Plant moringa trees.


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OldTart
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September 18, 2015 12:27 pm  

Plant moringa trees.

(tu)(tu)

Aren't they just awesome. Incredibly fast-growing, the most nutritious plant on the planet (a staple in my kitchen) - and if you don't have garden space they grow easily in a container while regular harsh pruning bushes them out.


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ms411
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September 18, 2015 3:00 pm  

Plant moringa trees.

I am passing your suggestion on to someone who works for one of the senators. We happened to pick this person up this morning. Before we picked this person up, we were discussing the horrible palm trees planted down the middle of Veterans' Drive. The person from legislature told us the government paid for a study which recommended that particular type of palm tree when we told him we didn't like the palm trees and preferred shade trees.

I showed this person the citylab.com article, but not enough time to start reading it. I printed it out and will deliver it later this afternoon.


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OldTart
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September 18, 2015 3:31 pm  

Moringas aren't a good substitute for palm trees where government planting is concerned. They grow extremely fast (up to 30 feet in one year) and, unless very frequently pruned, simply grow up and up so you end up with a long bare trunk topped by a head of foliage. When religiously pruned they branch out but those branches too need regular pruning. Somehow I doubt the government has the resources to keep a full time moringa-pruner on the books.

I grow mine for their exceptional nutritional value and to provide shade on my full-sun deck but they're not suited for the purpose you have in mind.

Best to hone up on the characteristics of tree species before making suggestions.


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ms411
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September 18, 2015 3:46 pm  

I'll leave the studying to them, but suggestion stays.


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OldTart
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September 18, 2015 3:50 pm  

I'll leave the studying to them, but suggestion stays.

Great response. As usual, if they're interested then they can conjure up several hundred dollars (maybe even a few thousand) to hire an outside consultant to confirm in a 20-page report. Business as usual.


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Spartygrad95
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September 18, 2015 4:10 pm  

Giant Redwoods produce a lot of shade. Pass that suggestion on


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Alana33
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September 18, 2015 4:24 pm  

Palm trees don't have their root systems expand and invade areas which could bring issues with cracking and eroding road surfaces and underground pipes, etc. They're pretty tolerant, needing minimal water and are sturdy enough to withstand average storms without being uprooted.

To replace them at this late date after all the money spent buying and planting them would be folly and wasted money.

Pass that on to your friend and don't waste his time or our money.


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ms411
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September 18, 2015 5:33 pm  

Nobody mentioned uprooting. Something to consider for next project.


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Alana33
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September 18, 2015 6:48 pm  

Palms are low maintenance.
Something to consider along with the other things I mentioned above.


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