Another boating que...
 
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Another boating question

 
stxdreamer
(@stxdreamer)
Advanced Member

As we get closer to making our "dream" a reality of moving to STX, we have started thinking of the possibility of getting involved in boating (something we have done here in Ky for most of our lives). We have fished a lot in the Keys and other saltwater venues, including twice in STX with guides. We're thinking along the lines of a 25-28' center console boat with outboards. I am wondering if anyone on the forum is currently a boater? If so, I'd love to discuss further the boating opportunities in the USVI, and particularly STX.

I am also wondering about how difficult the run would be from STX to STT? I've read in stories about the ferry service that the water can be habitually rough. I'm wondering how rough? A 40 mile run in a good cc ought not to be too difficult. Anyone with real world experiences here?

Thanks.

Steve

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Topic starter Posted : May 31, 2009 2:31 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

I have been on St Thomas for a while and have never been boating to St Croix. I have also never been by plane :$) ...one day... I do know of sailboat owners who have made the crossing, stayed for several days.

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Posted : May 31, 2009 4:03 pm
pamela
(@pamela)
Trusted Member

Email me if you like .. I can answer some basic questions.

Pamela
yachtsbypamela@yahoo.com

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Posted : May 31, 2009 6:06 pm
marlene
(@marlene)
Advanced Member

Hubby and I just bought our dreamboat. A 40 foot center cockpit Beneteau that came from Tortola. We have made the crossing with our boat at 5-6 knots. Takes a good 8 hours. We leave at 6 at night and get into Charlotte Amalie at 2 am. Just recently we left at 2 in the morning and came in about 10 am. either way it is a great weekend trip. PM me for more info on what you need for mooring info. hurricane info.

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Posted : May 31, 2009 9:49 pm
pamela
(@pamela)
Trusted Member

Dreamer,

I'll check with my captains but we are all in the same size as above. I believe our last trip was six hours ... catamarans with sail aux. Seas can be a little rougher than normal but are doable except for those days you really shouldn't be out in a small craft anyway. I would be a little worried about 25 - 30 feet craft. But then I am a sissy!

Will let you know what I find out from the guys driving the boats.

Pamela

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Posted : June 1, 2009 12:33 am
sail2wind
(@sail2wind)
Advanced Member

As long as you have a good weather window, flat seas and little wind, a 25-30' boat should be an easy trip.

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Posted : June 1, 2009 12:54 am
Exit Zero
(@exit-zero)
Trusted Member Registered

"flat seas and little wind" -- on the STX -STT run that will be about 20% of the days of the year.

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Posted : June 1, 2009 1:13 am
Juanita
(@Juanita)
Expert

It's a whole different trip in a sailboat than it is in a power boat. stxdreamer is talking about power. A 25-28 ft. sailboat would be a cakewalk on a "normal" day from STX to STT, not quite as good STT to STX, but not bad. In a power boat that size you would need to pick your window more carefully.

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Posted : June 1, 2009 4:01 am
Edward
(@Edward)
Trusted Member

What do boaters do during hurricanes and other storms?

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Posted : June 1, 2009 7:35 am
sail2wind
(@sail2wind)
Advanced Member

they put their boats on the hard, meaning on ground in a cradel

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Posted : June 1, 2009 7:39 am
marlene
(@marlene)
Advanced Member

On STX there is only one working boat yard for hauling large boats. You need to call when inclimate weather is approaching and get your name on the list. The travel lift was so overworked during Omar last year it quit just a day before the storm. When it started again the haulouts came in full force until the yard couldn't hold any more boats.

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Posted : June 1, 2009 11:09 am
pamela
(@pamela)
Trusted Member

Hauling out for hurricane season is a luxury I've never had been able to afford. We, my team and I, try to monitor an approaching storm on several different channels and subscribe to a couple of weather services. We pay close attention to the direction from which the storm is approaching... anyone remember Wrong Way Lenny? ... to ascertain which of the various hurricane holes would be the best fit. Then we make an educated guess as to storm swell, wind directions and lay out as many anchors as we can get our hands on, remove electronics and put them on land, clear the decks of anything that might break, bend, blow away and then leave. We start to pray and obsess by watching the weather as long as we have power. Then at the break of dawn the next morning we get the dinks out and start going boat to boat to see what happened. Then and only then do we start drinking!

A hopefully unnecessary note to add - DO NOT STAY ON THE BOAT during a storm. A boat is only a very expensive thing and can be replaced. You can not be replaced. Resist the implulse! Resist! Resist! Once that storm starts and you realize that staying on the boat was a very, very bad decision there is almost no safe way to get off. Hurricane Marilyn's deaths in STT and STJ were almost all people who stayed with the yacht so they could take care of it during the storm. Resist the impluse.

Pamela

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Posted : June 1, 2009 3:35 pm
sail2wind
(@sail2wind)
Advanced Member

excellent post, if you make arrangements in advance Nanny Cay can handle many boats on the hard, good time to get some exterior work done, they charge $10 a foot a month.

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Posted : June 1, 2009 4:20 pm
marlene
(@marlene)
Advanced Member

STX does not have the vast amounts of hurricane holes you have in STT and STJ. We only have Salt River. That has many boats in it during hurricanes if you are lucky enough to make it down there and get a good spot. Most people already have spots that are just for their hurricane mooring and pay DPNR for using that spot.

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Posted : June 1, 2009 10:23 pm
sail2wind
(@sail2wind)
Advanced Member

good news to know, are those spots still available? just in case

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Posted : June 1, 2009 11:47 pm
Exit Zero
(@exit-zero)
Trusted Member Registered

If people already have their spots and are paying for them - How can 'those spots' still be available?

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Posted : June 1, 2009 11:58 pm
Linda J
(@Linda_J)
Expert

On STX, Green Cay is also used extensively during hurricanes.

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Posted : June 2, 2009 12:20 am
marlene
(@marlene)
Advanced Member

When you don't have a spot you paid DPNR for, you need to get in and drop as many anchors as possible. You need to make very sure your boat is not in the scope of other boats when they arrive on their moorings. There are very big boats that go down there that have moorings.

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Posted : June 2, 2009 2:17 am
Exit Zero
(@exit-zero)
Trusted Member Registered

Thank You for taking the time to clarify the situation - appreciate the help.

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Posted : June 2, 2009 12:32 pm
stxdreamer
(@stxdreamer)
Advanced Member

To everyone who responded to this topic, either by posting here or by pm, Thank you. The bottom line appears to be that it is possible to travel by powerboat from STX to STT on a fairly regular basis, depending on the weather (obviously). Issues concerning boat storage, etc., remain. But, having grown up on a marina in Ky (my parent's business) I have some knowledge of the options available. One thing for sure--once we get there, if you have an interest in boating/fishing, let me know and we'll give it a try.

Steve

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Topic starter Posted : June 4, 2009 10:20 pm
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