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Comet Ison?

 
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

It is supposed to be visible now, but I haven't heard any word about where, etc. Swans, do you or anyone else have any words of wisdom? Hale-Bopp was so incredible. I suspect we might not see anything like that again, but one can always hope...

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Topic starter Posted : November 21, 2013 11:46 am
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

It is supposed to be visible now, but I haven't heard any word about where, etc. Swans, do you or anyone else have any words of wisdom? Hale-Bopp was so incredible. I suspect we might not see anything like that again, but one can always hope...

Good morning East Ender,

Space has been closely following Ison; I included a link below. The degree of visibility still remains unknown for the coming weeks as she approaches the Sun. She is worth watching for, however.

It's said: " Comets are like cats; they have tails, and they do precisely what they want." (David Levy)
Swan

http://www.space.com/23673-comet-ison-brightness-predictions.html

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Posted : November 21, 2013 12:36 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

Thank you, Swan. So look around Mercury and Spica? And is our southern latitude going to extend the time we might see it??

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Topic starter Posted : November 21, 2013 1:05 pm
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Thank you, Swan. So look around Mercury and Spica? And is our southern latitude going to extend the time we might see it??

Yes, as to Mercury and Spica; I have some doubt if the southern latitude will make any appreciable difference in viewing time, but I'm not 100% sure. The Sun poses a problem.

An excerpt from the article in Space: "Early today (Nov. 20), ISON was positioned roughly between the bright star Spica and the planet Mercury. From here on out, however, it will get harder to see ISON. The comet is now descending into the ever-brightening glow of the rising sun, and after Friday (Nov. 22) the comet will be all but out of sight — hidden by low altitude and the bright dawn twilight. After that, observers will have to wait about a week until the comet finally skirts the sun's surface. Will the comet survive its close brush with the sun, or will it fizzle? At this point, stargazers will just have to wait and see."

Let's keep our hopes up for a great viewing opportunity! 🙂
Swan

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Posted : November 21, 2013 1:19 pm
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Good Morning Everyone,
Space has given out another report on ISON and predicted where, when, and what may be seen of the comet through January 10th.
Enjoy!
Swan

http://www.space.com/23713-comet-ison-observers-guide-thanksgiving.html

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Posted : November 24, 2013 11:57 am
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone,
Ison encounters the Sun today.
Swan

http://www.space.com/23773-comet-ison-thanksgiving-sun-flyby-webcast.html

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Posted : November 28, 2013 12:57 pm
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Good Evening Everyone,
Sadly, Ison is gone.
NASA comments:
Swan

http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/comet-ison-fizzles-as-it-rounds-the-sun/index.html

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Posted : November 29, 2013 1:26 am
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

Well, I guess Hale-Bopp was really an anomaly. It was beautiful for a long while. Thanks for the update, Swan...

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Topic starter Posted : November 29, 2013 12:36 pm
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Good Morning Everyone,

And the saga continues with hopes of survival...East Ender, I think Ison is doing its very best to try and put on a show for you! Let's hope it can succeed!
NASA update:
Swan

http://www.nasa.gov/

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Posted : November 29, 2013 3:58 pm
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