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DPNR to Blame for Failing to Regulate Pesticides  

 

ms411
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Spartygrad95
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April 13, 2015 2:22 pm  

This has to do with certification/recertification not whether they are actually monitoring pesticide usage. This is again a criminal act by improperly using a pesticide against its labeled usage.


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ms411
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April 13, 2015 2:41 pm  

I took the title directly from the Daily News, but yes, I agree, title does not match the article content. I would like to know, though, if by no longer offering re-certification, what is the status of those who were certified?

Another example of money supposedly going down the rabbit hole.


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Spartygrad95
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April 13, 2015 3:14 pm  

The question is what is DPNR doing with 77k allotted for this purpose? It also seems like a small amount to begin. I never took a course since I spent 4 years in college studying this but I do know MANY people in Michigan were unable to pass (70%) the core part of the examination. They charged around $25 per test and you had to pay each time. Then you had to have another specific test in the area in you were specializing in. For example I took tests for turf, for ornamentals, for Right of Way, and aquatics. Each test also had a fee attached and you could either get continuing education credits by attending workshops/seminars for recertification or retake tests every two years.


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Alana33
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April 13, 2015 5:02 pm  

Seriously, is anyone surprised by this article or the fact that DPNR is not doing what they are supposed to be doing and that money is not being used for that which it was allocated for?

Just add it to the list and make sure you have plenty of paper!


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ms411
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April 13, 2015 5:40 pm  

Nobody is surprised, but the pesticide poisoning story has gone international, and all entities involved will hopefully be thoroughly investigated and that the investigations will be made public.

I'm hoping this incident will force some positive changes in adhering to law, and in enforcing the law. Terminix did not follow the law, and the EPA is asking why. A lot of people have some explaining to do.


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Alana33
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April 13, 2015 5:54 pm  

They have a lot of explaining to do about a lot of things. The bovoni dump fire that destroyed the methane collection system is another EPA nightmare. The list goes on.


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OldTart
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April 13, 2015 6:01 pm  

Terminix did not follow the law, and the EPA is asking why.

With all due respect I don't believe that even THAT has yet been fully established. There's a lot of hearsay and assumption bouncing around. The reports thus far have been chock full of, "likely", "maybe", "possibly" and "could be".


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ms411
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April 13, 2015 6:01 pm  

I think Bovoni dump exposes Legislature and/or WMA. Haven't seen that WMA/EPA is investigating.


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Alana33
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April 13, 2015 6:38 pm  

EPA mandated that WMA close the dump. Federal funds were involved that just went up in smoke to put it lightly.

Here's an interesting read:
http://greenervi.org/citizens-lawsuit/complaint-against-the-epa-viwma-and-dpnr/

Just Google: EPA fines Virgin Islands Waste Management Authority
Lots of info.


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ms411
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April 13, 2015 6:42 pm  

It has been established by multiple sources that Terminix applied the chemical in a residence, which is a use violation. The unit below tested positive for the chemical. Sea Glass admits Terminix fumigated the residential unit below. EPA has found chemical residue. Methyl bromide doesn't just blow in with the wind.

Thank goodness the medical response team did not wait for a completed investigation before providing treatment. They were the first to suspect methyl bromide poisoning and reacted immediately to save the family. I am still waiting for recognition for the responders and healthcare professionals.


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OldTart
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April 13, 2015 6:58 pm  

1. It has been established by multiple sources that Terminix applied the chemical in a residence, which is a use violation.

2. The unit below tested positive for the chemical.

3. Sea Glass admits Terminix fumigated the residential unit below.

4. EPA has found chemical residue. Methyl bromide doesn't just blow in with the wind.

5. Thank goodness the medical response team did not wait for a completed investigation before providing treatment. They were the first to suspect methyl bromide poisoning and reacted immediately to save the family.

6. I am still waiting for recognition for the responders and healthcare professionals.

1. Not so, not yet.

2. The unit below and the unit in which the family was staying tested positive for TRACES of methyl bromide.

3. Yes, Terminix treated the unit. Maybe they did use methyl bromide but, again, that has not yet been conclusively proven.

4. Chemical residue, not specifically methyl bromide. TRACES of methyl bromide and whatever else we simply don't yet know.

5. The medical team determined that the family's symptoms were consistent with pesticide poisoning, not specifically methyl bromide poisoning.

6. As are we all without jumping to assumptive conclusions.


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IslandHops
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April 13, 2015 6:59 pm  

So the Gov goes on CNN and confirms Methyl Bromide was used. He seems upset it was also used on his Condo.

So the question now is, what privileged information does the Gov have available so that he knows his place was treated? And more importantly, if there is information on where this chemical was used in the past, why is that information not being made public?


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OldTart
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April 13, 2015 7:11 pm  

What comes out of Mapp's mouth is the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth? Ahem ...


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Alana33
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April 13, 2015 7:39 pm  

St. John Rescue members that responded to the emergency call at Sirenusa were all tested afterwards and luckily, found to have no ill effects.


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ms411
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April 13, 2015 9:25 pm  

Thanks, Alana. That's good news. Wonder if they had masks or other protective gear? There are many lessons in this horrific incident.


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Spartygrad95
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April 13, 2015 9:38 pm  

I would doubt first responders would have even considered respirators or even had the right filter. Many pesticides require different filters so without knowing what or if even pesticide they were dealing with would make respirators unlikely. Methyl bromide is "lighter than air" if you will and is usually pumped in under tarps in the field. It quickly rises if not tarped and is a major ozone depleter which is one of the reason for being decertified


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Spartygrad95
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April 13, 2015 9:39 pm  

According to the article there is no classes offered in St Thomas/St John district. I wonder what qualifications are needed to teach course? I'll even bet I could do it. I'll even bet I'd volunteer my time.


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Alana33
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April 13, 2015 10:00 pm  

Thanks, Alana. That's good news. Wonder if they had masks or other protective gear? There are many lessons in this horrific incident.

They didn't know what the situation was when they were responding to the call so doubt very seriously that they were using any protective gear. It's not common to think pesticide poisoning when called to an emergency in the VI. Luckily, everyone that participated checked out healthy after it was discovered that was the cause.


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ms411
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April 13, 2015 10:05 pm  

I'm wondering if the Daily News edited the author's original submission? Does UVI hold exclusive pesticide certification contract?Let me check DLCA site..
As usual the media isn't providing enough info so will look for my own facts.


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Spartygrad95
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April 13, 2015 10:11 pm  

Dept. of Ag in Michigan handled it. Courses were taught through Michigan State University cooperative extension offices. They were not necessarily taught by PhDs.


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ms411
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April 13, 2015 11:43 pm  

I don't see where Licensing requires any certification for exterminators. I do remember seeing safety courses offered from time to time in the paper.

http://dlca.vi.gov/businesslicense/steps.htm


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janeinstx
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April 14, 2015 12:33 am  

According to their page you don't need one for pharmacy with and I can tell you that's not the case


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ms411
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April 14, 2015 1:07 am  

Jane, you're right, so wondering what other omissions are on the site that they insist people use????


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