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AllMashUp
(@AllMashUp)
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June 27, 2010 11:03 pm  

Found some termite pellets and weak spots in a plywood shelf in a built in the closet in the guest room, ripped out the shelf and opened all the tunnels to personally kill each one of the wood eatin bastards.

I couldn't find any tubes or additional damage is the adjacent framing or shelves but want some opinions from those who have dealt with termites in the past. The closet was sloppily built 30 years ago with the house and made of plywood so I wouldn't be against ripping the whole thing out and replace it with something like cedar...is there a local wood that would be an equivalent termite resistant?

Should I have a professional inspection completed with a local exterminator company if so which company? Or does the termite foam they sell in the hardware store work well enough in case I find any additional signs?

thanks


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DUN
 DUN
(@DUN)
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June 27, 2010 11:18 pm  

I don't know, bugs are not my field.
It's been said teak holds up well to insects, but some termites even bore through concrete!
If the bugs were alive as you indicated, you should be able to follow the trails, to a nest.
If you can't locate the trails from outside in, it could be far away from where you found the buggers(not very good I'm afraid.


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rks
 rks
(@rks)
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June 28, 2010 12:27 am  

It can be hard to locate active trails...some powder-post bugs will dump their frass and seal the tube behind them.

There are solitary ( ie not colonial) borers which will even attack pressure treated lumber.

Mahogany and teak are termite resistant (but NOT termite-proof). Spanish cedar (cedrela odorata) is too, but to a lesser extent.

If you have any concern about termites elsewhere in your house a fipronil treatment (marketed under lots of trade names) should do the trick if properly done. Fipronil is as close to a magic bullet as we are likely to get in the battle against ALL caribbean species of termites.

Good luck!


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Novanut
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June 28, 2010 1:32 am  

Make sure all the future wood you use is 'wolminized' (sp), meaning it's pressure treated and supposedly resistant to hungry termites and warping and wet weather. Anything else is just more food for the little guys... Good luck.


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Jumbie
(@ohiojumbie-2)
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June 28, 2010 10:53 am  

Make sure all the future wood you use is 'wolminized' (sp), meaning it's pressure treated and supposedly resistant to hungry termites and warping and wet weather. Anything else is just more food for the little guys... Good luck.

You are correct Novanut but the spelling for treated wood is "womanized". That is wood that is subjected to a specified high temperature for a specified period of time under pressure & basically sterlizes/kills any insects or insect larve that are in the wood.

Jumbie -STX;)


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SkysTheLimit
(@SkysTheLimit)
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June 28, 2010 11:25 am  

Wolmanized


Alana33 liked
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StCroix
(@StCroix)
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June 28, 2010 11:26 am  

Make sure they are termites and not powerpost beetles.

The beetles typically don't tunnel much...just lay their eggs in the wood and the larvae eat their way out.
For beetles...treat with borax then apply varnish.


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IslandHops
(@IslandHops)
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June 28, 2010 3:01 pm  

What's the best way to hold the beetle still when you apply the varnish?
Is there special beetle varnish brushes or is a spray application preferred?

I'm learning more each and every day 😎


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STXBob
(@STXBob)
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June 28, 2010 4:30 pm  

Oh, thanks for reminding me. I just popped my drawers into the car oven.

We seem to have a powder post beetle infestation in one of our bathroom vanities, particularly in the drawers. So I removed them and put them into my car, which is parked in the sun with the windows up. I hope to bake 'em 'til they're dead, without de-laminating the wood.

The baking trick is supposed to work with bed bugs in bedding material, so maybe it'll work with this problem.


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Jumbie
(@ohiojumbie-2)
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June 28, 2010 4:47 pm  

Wolmanized

Oh great Skys The Limit -- I stand corrected. Thanks --

Jumbie -STX


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Tippi
(@Tippi)
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June 29, 2010 3:40 pm  

We use "Timbor" for termite treatment. It's a wonderful DIY product and highly effective. We use it every spring and so far no problem with termites. You can google Timbor to find out more.


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AllMashUp
(@AllMashUp)
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June 30, 2010 2:25 am  

We use "Timbor" for termite treatment. It's a wonderful DIY product and highly effective. We use it every spring and so far no problem with termites. You can google Timbor to find out more.

Thanks, do you buy it on island? on stx?


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Tippi
(@Tippi)
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June 30, 2010 12:26 pm  

Thanks, do you buy it on island? on stx?

We have always shipped it in from a DIY Pest Control store in the states. You might call around to see if you can get it locally. As I said before we use it as preventative maintenance each year. We've been using it for 5 years and haven't had a problem.

It even helped with a carpenter ant problem.


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LittleMissSunrise
(@littlemisssunrise)
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August 5, 2020 1:56 am  

@SkysTheLimit 😂😂😂


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