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Types of jobs?

 
bowe1634
(@bowe1634)
New Member

What all kind of jobs are readily available on St. Thomas for a college degree holding 27 year old? I have over 10 years worth of experience in the restaurant/bar industry, and nearly three years time spent in banking/commercial lending. Basically, I'm wondering which route to take upon my move there here in the future. My girlfriend and I live pretty simple lives and don't require a whole lot.

What would be my best bet to find a job that would cover the basics with a little room to spare/enjoy our time on the island?
I'm trying to decide if my "professional" experience would be more beneficial or if I should focus more on my restaurant/bar management experiences. I have also considered working somewhere with scuba diving as I'm an advanced open water certified PADI diver.

Lastly, how important/relevant are resumes on St. Thomas, as compared to their importance on the US mainland?

Thanks!

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Topic starter Posted : January 5, 2012 5:13 am
Linda J
(@Linda_J)
Expert

Unless you have a very special skill, surgeon, teacher, registered nurse, you will probably have to be present, on-island, standing in front of a prospective employer, to get a job. Many, many people think about relocating and tell employers they are relocating and then never do. In order to be taken seriously, you have to be here.

Make arrangements for short-term living. Come down with a few things and some money, between $7,500 and $10,000. When you get here hit the ground running looking for both long term housing and ANY kind of job. After you find a temp job and are settled, you can look for something in your field.

Goodluck.

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Posted : January 5, 2012 6:58 am
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

I'd also recommend reading everything there is to read on this website, including the many moving stories. If you haven't done a PMV it's an excellent idea and can save you a lot of money and time!

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Posted : January 5, 2012 7:56 am
STXBob
(@STXBob)
Trusted Member

So, when the OP moves here, should he focus on restaurant/bar management, or a "professional" track, or scuba diving, and how important is a resume?

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Posted : January 5, 2012 1:42 pm
VIsnorkeler
(@VIsnorkeler)
Trusted Member

Resume is not of such importance. I think that question was answered, perhaps indirectly, by saying face-to-face is the way toget a job. And the OP should pound ALL pavement. Get out there for restaurant, scuba, AND professional. Take whatever he gets first, then, later, at leisure, find what suits him best. I think that was stated as well, maybe not as susinctly.

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Posted : January 5, 2012 2:10 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

A resumé is important in most professional settings and also be prepared with employer references and contact numbers.

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Posted : January 5, 2012 2:21 pm
HappyFace
(@HappyFace)
Advanced Member

Gee Bob You just asked the op's same questions. That was a big Help.bowe1634 always keep a current copy of your resume handy. Your best chance for immediate employment would be the Restaurant/Bar business. A face to face employment/interview is the norm on the islands good luck and welcome.:-)

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Posted : January 5, 2012 3:33 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

bowe: I think initially it would be easier to find the restaurant/bar work, but keep an eye out for the banking jobs. I may be wrong about this, but for diving, except for working in a store, you need to have at least divemaster certification. If you are also a certified boat captain, all the better.:D

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Posted : January 5, 2012 10:16 pm
blu4u
(@blu4u)
Trusted Member

With a degree and three years experience you should be qualified for a position in financial services. Is your degree business, marketing, finance or IT related? Are you currently employed in commercial lending? Do you have a polished resume? Reliable references? A solid letter of introduction? Check on line for postings. Try to make some contacts in advance. Send resumes. Arrange interviews.
This sounds corny, but..where do you see yourself in five years? 10? 20? 40? Are you considering graduate school? Do you want a family, kids, own a home? Retire?
Are you ready to start a career? Or, are you looking for some "adventure"?

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Posted : January 5, 2012 11:29 pm
bowe1634
(@bowe1634)
New Member

So basically, I need to come down here with some serious cash/liquid monies, and beat the pavement in order to find a job, correcf? That seems like a good bit of money that you're suggesting I bring down with me, so I can only ask - is that a higher estimate with some "just in case" cash? Or would that be a realistic number? I'm just wanting to make sure that I have all my ducks in a row so to speak.

As far as the financial background is concerned, I currently work for a state based community bank, that deals primarily in commerical lending. I currently manage three of the eleven branches in the state, while also booking commercial loans at this bank, as well as at one of the smaller, more recently acquired (and under a different holding company that is owned by the same party) community banks that was just purchased. I deal mainly with construction loans, lines of credit, and some consumer loans too, directly with the SVP, who is over the enitre lending department. I would say that although I'm relatively new at lending, it's something I've picked up somewhat easily and with a natural ease.

My actual degree is in business management, and yes, I've considered going back for my MBA, but for the time being, it's on the back burner.

Where would you suggest looking as far as online posts/classifieds for potential job openings?

2 things to end this with: 1) why am I/what is an OP? 2) what is a PMV? Pre-move visit is the best I can come up with.

Thanks to all of you!

RB

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Topic starter Posted : January 6, 2012 3:59 am
budone
(@budone)
Active Member

2 things to end this with: 1) why am I/what is an OP? 2) what is a PMV? Pre-move visit is the best I can come up with.

Thanks to all of you!

RB

PMV is Pre move visit
OP is YOU. Original Poster

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Posted : January 6, 2012 4:29 am
LisaB
(@LisaB)
Advanced Member

The amount of money suggested is realistic. I would go so far as to suggest bringing $10,000 to $15,000 if you can swing it. You'll need to stay somewhere temporarily while you're looking for something permanent and short-term is usually more expensive than long-term. If you find a permanent place to live you'll need first and last months' rent plus a security deposit. That can easily run anywhere from $2000 to $5000.

Then you have to buy food necessities like spices, condiments, etc. Most food down here is very expensive. I would budget between $800 and $1000 for homestead startup.

Unless you're shipping your own car, you'll need to buy a vehicle. An island beater that you would probably pay less than $1000 for stateside will cost you at least $2500 here...and that's if you're lucky to find one, AND are the first to call.

Most importantly (and please trust us on this) you want to set aside enough money for a return ticket in case it doesn't work out for you.

Welcome to the USVI!!

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Posted : January 6, 2012 7:27 am
ms411
(@ms411)
Expert

Merchant's Bank was looking for a part-time rep on STT. Check career.vi for listings. We have Scotia Bank, Bancorp Popular, First Bank. Some jobs are posted on Craigslist for the VI, but some look like scams so be careful.

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Posted : January 6, 2012 9:27 am
ms411
(@ms411)
Expert

And there's this:

http://stthomassource.com/ad/employment/2011/12/02/junior-credit-analyst-sought

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Posted : January 6, 2012 12:03 pm
VIsnorkeler
(@VIsnorkeler)
Trusted Member

For two people, I think that $10K sounds about right. More, if you can swing it. Everywhere is going to want first, last, and security. My rent for my one bedroom attached cottage in a safe neighborhood, close to work is $1100, so that was $3300 of the money we brought right there. We bought a vehicle for $4500. That's already most of what we've suggested you bring with you. Then there were deposits for WAPA and the cable, household set-up, as previously mentioned. Adds up quick! Oh, insurance on the car, whatever you spend on temporary housing and car rental until you find permanent.

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Posted : January 6, 2012 1:54 pm
poorthang
(@poorthang)
Advanced Member

The money requirements suggested are for the "serios" relocaters. Time is your friend once ON island.The longer you can stay the probability is greater with talent and hard work you can make it.Put Insurance on your short list ,the banks are crossselling.Good luck!

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Posted : January 6, 2012 2:42 pm
STXBob
(@STXBob)
Trusted Member

And don't rent long-term housing, sight unseen.

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Posted : January 6, 2012 3:05 pm
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