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swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Miss Swan

1. A form of symbiosis called commensalism.

2. Sergeant Major

3. Periwinkle

Thanks,

JJ

Hi JJ.

1. Commensalism is an association between two organisms in which one benefits and the other derives neither benefit nor harm.

Symbiosis is the interaction between two different organisms living in close physical association, typically to the advantage of both. In this case, both benefit: the Clown fish, through his swimming around and swimming through the anemone stirs up the water and nutrients for it and the anemone provides protection for the Clown fish through its ability to kill predator fish with its toxic tubes. Both benefit from the relationship. Cool! 🙂

2. Yes! Sergeant Major.

3. Yes! Periwinkle snail!

Congratulations! Excellent!

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Topic starter Posted : April 6, 2015 10:17 pm
Pdmargie
(@Pdmargie)
Advanced Member

What mammal has the shortest gestation time?
What animal has the highest blood pressure?
What mammal has, by far, has the richest milk?

Enjoy!

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Posted : April 7, 2015 1:21 am
dougtamjj
(@dougtamjj)
Expert

1. an opossum

2. A giraffe

3. A seal

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Posted : April 7, 2015 11:09 am
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

May I add to JJ's research?

Although the shortest gestation time belongs to the Virginia Opossum,' the shortest gestation period known is 12 to 13 days, shared by three marsupials: the American or Virginian opossum (Didelphis marsupialis); the rare water opossum, or yapok (Chironectes minimus) of central and northern South America; and the eastern native cat (Dasyurus viverrinus) of Australia.'

This is the eastern native cat of Australia...cute!

And this is the Yapok of South America...another cutie...

And this is our beautiful Virginia Opossum!

Adorable!!!

http://topics.info.com/Which-mammals-have-the-shortest-and-longest-gestation-periods_2301

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Topic starter Posted : April 7, 2015 12:52 pm
Pdmargie
(@Pdmargie)
Advanced Member

1. an opossum

2. A giraffe

3. A seal

Very good, however the blue whale has the highest percentage of protein in the milk, slightly more than seals. Bandicoot in Australia at 12.5 average is widely considered to have the shortest gestation time of any mammal. It's a toss up with the opossum.

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Posted : April 7, 2015 11:23 pm
Pdmargie
(@Pdmargie)
Advanced Member

Tuna, "warm blooded" or "cold blooded"?

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Posted : April 7, 2015 11:26 pm
dougtamjj
(@dougtamjj)
Expert

Well Actually, bluefin Tuna and some other species are neither warmblooded nor coldblooded. They are species in between, meaning that they selectively warm parts of their body.

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Posted : April 8, 2015 12:01 am
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

1. an opossum

2. A giraffe

3. A seal

Very good, however the blue whale has the highest percentage of protein in the milk, slightly more than seals. Bandicoot in Australia at 12.5 average is widely considered to have the shortest gestation time of any mammal. It's a toss up with the opossum.

http://www.earthlife.net/mammals/milk.html

'....The milks that are highest in fat overall include the gray seal milk with 53.2 percent fat; whale milk with 34.8 percent fat;, and polar bear milk with 31 percent fat.....'

Protein content is 119.8 ml/mg/L in the Harp Seal and 127.9 ml/mg/L in the Blue Whale.

To what is the question referring based on 'richness'...protein or fat content?

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Topic starter Posted : April 8, 2015 3:08 am
Pdmargie
(@Pdmargie)
Advanced Member

1. an opossum

2. A giraffe

3. A seal

Very good, however the blue whale has the highest percentage of protein in the milk, slightly more than seals. Bandicoot in Australia at 12.5 average is widely considered to have the shortest gestation time of any mammal. It's a toss up with the opossum.

http://www.earthlife.net/mammals/milk.html

Guess I should have been more specific and asked about protein content. Interestingly enough, a baby blue whale can gain over 10 pounds and hour and over 200 pounds per DAY

'....The milks that are highest in fat overall include the gray seal milk with 53.2 percent fat; whale milk with 34.8 percent fat;, and polar bear milk with 31 percent fat.....'

Protein content is 119.8 ml/mg/L in the Harp Seal and 127.9 ml/mg/L in the Blue Whale.

To what is the question referring based on 'richness'...protein or fat content?

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Posted : April 8, 2015 11:45 am
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Anyone interested in returning to the oceans?
Have fun and enjoy!
Swan

1. What are a group of sea birds called?

2. Purple sea anemones and clownfish enjoy sharing a unique living arrangement: What is this living relationship called?

3 What are a group of herring called?

4. What are a group of jellyfish called?

?5. What is the definition of a plant-eating animal? Sea urchins are a good example of a marine animal that feeds on kelp, for instance.

6. A species that occurs naturally in an area (i.e. is not introduced) is referred to as what type of species?

7. A species that can live in many different habitats and can feed on a number of different organisms is referred to as what? For example, shore crabs on the Pacific coast live in a wide variety of habitats, such as mud, sand and rock, and feed on everything from the algae growing on rocks to invertebrates to detritus.

8. What are microscopic algae with plate-like structures composed of silica called?

9. To protect themselves against predators, many animals acquire coloring and markings to match and conceal themselves in their usual surroundings. For example the nudibranch (sea slug), Rostanga pulchra, is practically indiscernible from the red sponges on which it lays its eggs. What is this phenomenon known as?

10. What is a species which no longer exists called?

11. What is the broadest classification for animals called?

12. This term refers to the form and structure of an organism, in particular its outside features. What is this term?

13. What is the name of the zone of the ocean that extends from 1000m to 4000m below the surface of the ocean called?

14. Pelagic organisms that are free-swimming and so whose movements are independent of the tides, currents and waves are called what? Such animals include fish, whales, squid, crabs and shrimps. The distribution of these characters is limited by temperature and nutrient supply and decreases with decreasing depth.

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Topic starter Posted : April 8, 2015 7:39 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

2. Symbiotic

1. Flock, flight or parcel. Some seabirds are known as tubrenoses.

3. Army or shoal of herring.

4 BROOD, SMUCK or SMACK of jellyfish.

5 herbivorous - feeding only on plants

6. Indigenous

7. Generalist

8. Diatoms

9. Camouflage

10. Extinct

Time for dinner. Will check back later for the rest!

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Posted : April 8, 2015 10:12 pm
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

1. Flock, flight or parcel. Some seabirds are known as tubrenoses. - there is another specific term I'm looking for. 🙂

2, Symbiotic. - Yes!

3. Army or shoal of herring. - Yes!

4 BROOD, SMUCK or SMACK of jellyfish. - Yes! Although I only had smack and brood.

5 herbivorous - feeding only on plants - Yes!

6. Indigenous - Yes! Native.

7. Generalist - Yes!

8. Diatoms - Yes!

9. Camouflage - True. Another term also applies to this phenomenon...know what it is?

10. Extinct - Yes!

Time for dinner. Will check back later for the rest! 😀 Yes! Enjoy!!!

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Topic starter Posted : April 8, 2015 10:40 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

Bird Colony? Generally used for nesting seabirds.

Animals use coloration to mimic their surroundings?

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Posted : April 8, 2015 11:09 pm
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Bird Colony? Generally used for nesting seabirds.

Animals use coloration to mimic their surroundings?

There is a cute sort of name that defines a group of seabirds, although not mentioned among those you listed.

Another definition also exists for the camouflage ocean critters use for protection.

What has happened is that we have multiple definitions for the same fact; but it's not unusual in science...:-) You have added more great answers to the questions posted. Thanks!

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Topic starter Posted : April 8, 2015 11:24 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

Seabirds come in groups called a Wreck.

Here's an interesting link for names of groups of animals:
http://www.writers-free-reference.com/172groupnames.htm

Cryptic Colouration: >To protect themselves against predators, many animals acquire colouring and markings to match and conceal them in their usual surroundings. For example the nudibranch (sea slug), Rostanga pulchra, is practically indiscernible from the red sponges on which it lays its eggs.

11. A hierarchical system is used for classifying organisms to the species level. This system is called taxonomic classification.

12. Morphology

13. Mesopelagic/ Twilight Zone
http://www.seasky.org/deep-sea/ocean-layers.html

14. Pelagic organisms that are free-swimming and so whose movements are independent of the tides, currents and waves. ... (biofluidynamics, biomechanics, functional morphology of fluid locomotion, locomotor physiology) is called nektology.

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Posted : April 9, 2015 3:23 am
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Seabirds come in groups called a Wreck.

Here's an interesting link for names of groups of animals: Yes! Wreck...
http://www.writers-free-reference.com/172groupnames.htm

Cryptic Colouration: >To protect themselves against predators, many animals acquire colouring and markings to match and conceal them in their usual surroundings. For example the nudibranch (sea slug), Rostanga pulchra, is practically indiscernible from the red sponges on which it lays its eggs.
Yes!

11. A hierarchical system is used for classifying organisms to the species level. This system is called taxonomic classification. Phylum

A hierarchical system is used for classifying organisms to the species level. This system is called taxonomic classification. The broadest classifications are by domain and kingdom; the most specific classification is by genus and species. The hierarchical groupings in between include phylum, class, family, and order

12. Morphology - Yes!

13. Mesopelagic/ Twilight Zone
http://www.seasky.org/deep-sea/ocean-layers.html
The Mesopelagic is located in the zone 'above' this particular one....

14. Pelagic organisms that are free-swimming and so whose movements are independent of the tides, currents and waves. ... (biofluidynamics, biomechanics, functional morphology of fluid locomotion, locomotor physiology) is called nektology.

Yes! Nektology![/quote]

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Topic starter Posted : April 9, 2015 10:26 am
dougtamjj
(@dougtamjj)
Expert

Hi Miss Swan, Sorry we missed the science questions. Our internet was down last night. By the time we saw the questions they had been answered. We researched the answers anyway and did them for science class today.

Thank you for the questions.
JJ

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Posted : April 9, 2015 1:21 pm
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Hi Miss Swan, Sorry we missed the science questions. Our internet was down last night. By the time we saw the questions they had been answered. We researched the answers anyway and did them for science class today.

Thank you for the questions.
JJ

Hi JJ. You are very welcome! I'm sorry your computer was down, but I am pleased that you used the questions for science study. One question remains unanswered:
Ms. Swan

What is the name of the zone of the ocean that extends from 1000m to 4000m below the surface of the ocean called?

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Topic starter Posted : April 9, 2015 1:52 pm
dougtamjj
(@dougtamjj)
Expert

The Mesopelagic Zone or Twilight Zone.

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Posted : April 9, 2015 2:08 pm
dougtamjj
(@dougtamjj)
Expert

Ooops, I think that is wrong.

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Posted : April 9, 2015 2:13 pm
dougtamjj
(@dougtamjj)
Expert

The dark zone.

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Posted : April 9, 2015 2:14 pm
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

The dark zone.

It certainly is dark down in the zone asked about, but that is not the name for it; The Mesopelagic Zone or Twilight Zone is located above this very dark zone that extends from 1000M to 4000M below the surface of the ocean. 🙂
What could it be called?

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Topic starter Posted : April 9, 2015 2:25 pm
dougtamjj
(@dougtamjj)
Expert

It is the Bathypelagic Zone. Our book just calls it the dark zone. We need a new book!

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Posted : April 9, 2015 2:48 pm
DanielB_STX
(@DanielB_STX)
Advanced Member

Bathypelagic Zone ? is my guess........

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Posted : April 9, 2015 2:49 pm
swans
(@swans)
Trusted Member

Bathypelagic Zone ? is my guess........

Right, Daniel! Bathypelagic Zone! (tu)

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Topic starter Posted : April 9, 2015 2:55 pm
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