20-something couple...
 
Notifications
Clear all

20-something couple moving in December. Advice?  

 

modjax
(@modjax)
New Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1
April 7, 2015 12:55 pm  

My husband and I are moving to the USVI in December.

We have no idea how we're going to get our stuff from NYC down to there, or if it's even worth it to pay the enormous fee we know it will cost. What is the best way to get stuff there? We have a bed, a big bookshelf/table thing, a bunch of clothes, and too many books. To those of you who've done this, what were your experiences? Is furniture expensive there? Should we just ditch our duds or try to ship?

We are teachers by trade but will work pretty much any job. What are some good avenues for job hunting? Is it realistic to expect a job in-hand upon arrival?

We will drive a beater, but we have no idea how much to expect to spend. What is the cheapest way of acquiring transport?

We're not sure what kind of abode we'll start off in. How hard is it to secure an apartment? Is it like a lot of other places that require a million dollars in down payment and a DNA sample? Or is it more laid back? What about subletting for the first few months - are those hard to come by?

Basically we're saving every dime we can and hoping that we can make it work the way we made our NYC move work a couple of years ago. (It's too cold here and people are too crabby.)

Please, any tips you have are welcome.


Quote
TommySTX
(@TommySTX)
Advanced Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 220
April 7, 2015 1:24 pm  

Have you visited the islands before? That would go a long way in helping you to get a handle on some aspects of island life.

Bringing furniture and household goods is definitely not necessary as most rentals come fully furnished and even some houses that are being sold will come with all the furniture. If you have some things you love or don't want to leave behind then you could contact shipping companies for quotes. There are a few that advertise right on this site. I believe the going rate for shipping HHG's on their own is around $3.50 per cubic foot. There is also the option of reserving an entire container and shipping your stuff inside of there.

As a teacher you will be able to find a position fairly quickly as teachers are always in short supply it seems. You will need to go through the red tape process to do so. There are a few other frequent posters on the forum that could help you with that.

Acquiring transport. There are 2 options. Ship a vehicle down that you know is reliable. Try to make sure it's manufactured in America so you don't have to pay duty. VIN # starts with 1, 4 or 5 means it's made in America. Second option is buying a used vehicle once you get here. There are always a lot available but you will pay a bit more than you would back in the states for the same vehicle.

House or apartment rentals usually require first and last month's rent plus security deposit equal to a month's rent. Some don't require the last month's rent. As I said, there are a lot that are already furnished. It's basically the same as renting a place back in the states.

You guys should do your best to make that visit before actually moving. You can get a better idea of which island you like, what area you like and if the whole 'living on a rock in the middle of the ocean" suits your lifestyle.

Good Luck.


ReplyQuote
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 6523
April 7, 2015 1:29 pm  

My suggestion is you start by reading all the general information here in the scroll-down menus top of this page. There's a wealth of information there.

Leave your "stuff" at home and just bring what you need in the way of a few clothes and toiletries. Most rentals are furnished and there is plenty of furniture here for sale if you decide to stay and get something unfurnished. Landlords generally ask for first, last and security, plus you'll have to allow for deposits for electricity service, internet, TV, etc.

December is a very busy month and finding work in the tourist sector may be a little difficult as most positions are filled for season by October/November. Rentals may also be at a premium for the same reason. $15-$20 will probably be enough to get you set up with accommodation, a cheap vehicle (insurance, etc, too) and enough to keep you going for a couple of weeks until you start making money.

Good luck!

PS: Of course that's $15-20K - quite a typo!


ReplyQuote
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 6523
April 7, 2015 1:34 pm  

As a teacher you will be able to find a position fairly quickly as teachers are always in short supply it seems. You will need to go through the red tape process to do so. There are a few other frequent posters on the forum that could help you with that.

Most of those seeking a teaching job get the paperwork completed before moving as, you're right, it's a slow process. And you definitely need to get a first-hand look at the schools and talk with the administrators before making a commitment - again another good reason for a pre-move visit.


ReplyQuote
SausageInTheCan
(@SausageInTheCan)
Advanced Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 396
April 7, 2015 3:18 pm  

Have you been here or are you doing this on a whim? Do a PMV. This way if things don't work out you don't pay to move all that stuff back. Some people are gone after just six months.

I agree that December is the wrong month to move down. It will be difficult to find jobs, apartments and a car. September/October is better.


ReplyQuote
Alana33
(@Alana33)
Expert
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 12291
April 7, 2015 3:19 pm  

Plus it'll take forever for them to get you a first paycheck once you've actually been hired and start working so be prepared for that eventuality.


ReplyQuote
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 8792
April 7, 2015 4:51 pm  

have you decided on an island yet? that would be helpful to us in giving you more localized answers


ReplyQuote
wanderer
(@wanderer)
Trusted Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 596
April 7, 2015 9:56 pm  

My husband and I are moving to the USVI in December.

First and foremost, don't move before making a PMV (a pre-move visit). But it looks like you've already made your decision.

We have no idea how we're going to get our stuff from NYC down to there, or if it's even worth it to pay the enormous fee we know it will cost. What is the best way to get stuff there? We have a bed, a big bookshelf/table thing, a bunch of clothes, and too many books.

Most of the clothes you have in NYC would probably be unused in USVI.

(It's too cold here and people are too crabby.)

I know what you mean. It would certainly be a relief to experience the tropical climate and the Caribbean people. But it comes with its own set of issues. Instead of frost bites and nasty slush, you'd get heat rashes and insects bites. And when the typically warm Caribs get irritated with heat, they like to use their machetes and guns. Don't expect the NYC-style of police protection, either. Not trying to talk you out of your move, but there is a world of difference between living in NYC and in USVI. You may like it, or you may not. Think of it this way: if USVI is such a paradise, why is its population declining? There are many good reasons to move to USVI, and many good reasons to not move to USVI. The unofficial stats is that out of every 10 newcomers, 9 move back to the states within the first few years. So, the odds are heavily against you. You really have to be a very certain type to feel at home in USVI.


ReplyQuote
sheiba
(@sheiba)
Advanced Member
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 483
April 8, 2015 1:29 am  

In your twenties? No children? Sell your stuff or store, pack your bags and go for it.!!!


ReplyQuote
stxonmymind
(@stxonmymind)
Advanced Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 27
April 8, 2015 4:22 am  

Well what are some good reasons to move to the USVI? Machetes and guns sounds really bad. What keeps you there?


ReplyQuote
Alana33
(@Alana33)
Expert
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 12291
April 8, 2015 9:28 am  

What happens where you live, stxonmymind?
Any random violence?
Why do you like it or wish to move?

Living on a small island is not for everyone, especially if one has unrealistic expectations and is a high maintenance type of person that simply can't go with the flow, is impatient, intolerant, or can't make do under certain circumstances. Living on a small island can
be limiting. Some take to it, some don't.

People move here for many reasons and leave for many reasons.
I'm sure you'll find much info on the many threads available on this forum.

Wanderer spent a month vacationing on STX last year and a couple weeks on STJ, this year. Making observations about living here is vastly different from actually doing so.


ReplyQuote
CruzanIron
(@cruzaniron)
Trusted Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 2483
April 8, 2015 2:39 pm  

Wanderer spent a month vacationing on STX last year and a couple weeks on STJ, this year. Making observations about living here is vastly different from actually doing so.

But what he learned and shared is what someone doing a PMV may never learn.


ReplyQuote
Daves007
(@Daves007)
New Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 4
April 8, 2015 6:16 pm  

If I was in my 20's I would sell or store as mentioned and head straight to St John. Either you stay a while or you come back. You won't regret it. I wish I had that opportunity when I was 20.


ReplyQuote
stxonmymind
(@stxonmymind)
Advanced Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 27
April 8, 2015 6:41 pm  

What happens where you live, stxonmymind?
Any random violence?
Why do you like it or wish to move?

I live in Birmingham, AL there is definitely crime here. I am just trying to measure it. Crime and BS is every where. As far as the person you describe to live on an island I fit most of the necessary prerequisites so that's good. Sounds like a good way to live, now I'll put in the work so I can get there! Thanks.


ReplyQuote
wanderer
(@wanderer)
Trusted Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 596
April 8, 2015 7:06 pm  

Crime and BS is every where.

That's a frequently used argument here, which misses the quantitative aspect of crime in a profound manner. This is like researching Seattle as place to live, and asking in the Seattle forum, "I really hate rain. Would it be a problem for me in Seattle?". To this, you may get a response, "Yeah, there is some rain in Seattle, but there is rain everywhere. As long as you carry an umbrella with you, you'd be fine".


ReplyQuote
SausageInTheCan
(@SausageInTheCan)
Advanced Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 396
April 8, 2015 8:16 pm  

In places like Seattle, Birmingham and other cities in the states, the police competently and thoroughly investigate crimes. They don't throw out or "lose" forensic evidence. People are never placed under house arrest without bail for capital crimes. It doesn't matter who you know.
When the criminals have no fear of prosecution they commit more crimes.


ReplyQuote
stxonmymind
(@stxonmymind)
Advanced Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 27
April 8, 2015 9:38 pm  

I appreciate everyone's opinions. Best to continue to learn as much as I can. Have a wonderful day wherever you may find yourself!


ReplyQuote
Close Menu