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Advice about moving here.

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snicole962
(@snicole962)
Active Member

So I am currently in college, I still have another year. I graduate in May 2017. My plans are to move to an island somewhere after I graduate. I am sick of school and the whole concept of living to work. I want to enjoy the simple things and be close to the ocean and go scuba diving, sailing, and such. I was thinking about the US VI or Hawaii, but I was leaning more towards US VI. After I started reading some of the posts, a lot of people made it sound like it was awful and a mistake to live here...I am not sure how long I would stay at least a year. I just want to explore and be on my own. I would need to find a place to rent. I am studying Interior Design and I have a minor in Hospitality and Tourism. I have been a waitress for years and I recently started bartending and I don't mind doing either of those things. Is it a bad decision moving here?? Someone help me please! While I was there I would also like to go to Aruba, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica...I love the ocean and I love to travel.

Thank you in advance for the advice!! 🙂

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Topic starter Posted : January 19, 2016 3:35 am
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

... I am sick of ... the whole concept of living to work. I want to enjoy the simple things and be close to the ocean and go scuba diving, sailing, and such.
... While I was there I would also like to go to Aruba, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica...I love the ocean and I love to travel.

🙂

Bluntly, unless you have several thousand dollars burning a hole in your pocket, doing all that on a serving/bartending income is going to be nigh to impossible. Inter-island travel is very expensive (check geographical locations, fares). Scuba diving and sailing are expensive - but when you have the odd couple of hours off work to get to a beach, snorkeling is free!

"Living to work" will be exactly what you'll be doing just to get by day to day covering the basics of food, shelter and transportation. If you haven't done so, read all the information available in the drop-down menus top of this page so you have a better understanding of the reality of living here. Good luck!

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Posted : January 19, 2016 9:18 am
STTsailor
(@STTsailor)
Trusted Member

It can be done but you will have to get creative. If you graduate from school w/o student loans, mortgage, car payments and manage to bring some cash savings with you until you find a job you will do fine here. If you are a skilled designer STT definitely needs these skills. I could not find anyone here to design my living room, pick colors, furniture. You could get gigs from realtors staging rentals or for sale properties. Plenty of tourists service, restaurant jobs otherwise.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 1:26 pm
Afriend
(@afriend)
Trusted Member

This may sound harsh but if you are still in college I assume you are relatively young (say in your early 20's). If you are already "...sick of school and the whole concept of living to work..." I'm sorry to say that you have much bigger problems then moving to another location will solve.

I suggest that before you make any major decisions you get some professional counseling to help find out the root of why you have such a negative outlook toward life. Quite honestly it is not normal for a young person stating life's journey to sound so depressed.

As Old Tart pointed out traveling, sailing, Scuba diving are all discretionary activities that take discretionary money. I'm sure you already know this but to earn money one must have a good education and find a good paying job, hopefully in an industry that they enjoy, and even then it usually takes the average person years to advance far enough in their chosen career before their earnings are significant enough that they have enough discretionary income. I dare say, most recent college grads with little or no work experience barely earn enough to pay necessities like rent, food, basic transportation and perhaps an occasional night out with friends.

Life in the Caribbean, like it is everywhere, is not "simple" unless you have a a very large trust fund or come from a wealthy family that is willing to support your lifestyle. If, on the other hand, you are like most young people you'll have to earn a living and that takes work.

I wish you good luck and hope you can find a way to improve your outlook on life.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 1:32 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

Another thing which I forgot to mention is that the majority of those who come here for a few months to a year to work in the hospitality industry have to really hustle to make money in season (November-April) sufficient to carry them through off-season when jobs are eliminated/slow down. If you manage to land a couple of serving/bartending gigs (and I do mean a couple as one isn't likely to bring you in enough money for the basics), that extra money has to be put aside for the lean months.

STTsailor's suggestions utilizing your creative talents might apply if you were planning on moving here for a while rather than just taking a year off before embarking on a career but aren't, in my opinion, practical short-term.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 2:03 pm
JohnnyU
(@JohnnyU)
Advanced Member

Post

Unfortunately this is fairly common with Millennials.

The common attitude is I want a 6 figure salary and work about 20hrs/week with no skills

(Not saying all but there is a significant number that have a sense of entitlement)

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Posted : January 19, 2016 2:49 pm
monogram
(@monogram)
Advanced Member

Nicole, I apologize on behalf of Virgin Islanders for the way you've been treated in this thread. It is apparent that the transplant boomers are out in force today.

I applaud your willingness to move here! It can be expensive and the dating scene is terrible, especially on STX (see https://www.vimovingcenter.com/talk/read.php?4,60172,60191), but it can work if you're willing to be adventurous and work hard.

Like people have hinted at, scuba and other activities can be expensive, though as a young (presumably white) female, you should be able to find your way onto someone's boat at least a few times a month (took my friend about a half hour on STT before she was invited haha).

There is a serious "brain drain" of educated young people, so having more come down is always a good thing!

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Posted : January 19, 2016 3:11 pm
monogram
(@monogram)
Advanced Member

Post

Unfortunately this is fairly common with Millennials.

The common attitude is I want a 6 figure salary and work about 20hrs/week with no skills

(Not saying all but there is a significant number that have a sense of entitlement)

*Wrecks worldwide economy placing millennials in perpetual debt to pay for their entitlements*
*Claims that Millennials - the most educated, industrious generation in history - have a sense of entitlement*

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Posted : January 19, 2016 3:15 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

... I apologize on behalf of Virgin Islanders for the way you've been treated in this thread.

I applaud your willingness to move here! ...

... There is a serious "brain drain" of educated young people, so having more come down is always a good thing!

No apology is necessary, "on behalf of Virgin Islanders". The young lady asked questions which were answered honestly and relevant to her particular situation.

She is not "moving here" per se, she is thinking of taking a year off between college and career to live on an island, travel to other places and generally have fun. HUGE difference.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 3:30 pm
wanderer
(@wanderer)
Trusted Member

Nicole, I apologize on behalf of Virgin Islanders for the way you've been treated in this thread. It is apparent that the transplant boomers are out in force today.

Haha. I think these folks fall into the generation before the boomers generation. In this forum, I particularly enjoy reading their nostalgic memoirs about the price of gas and food some place in Kansas, in 1950s.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 3:44 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

Message Removed: Please revisit board rules.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 3:59 pm
wanderer
(@wanderer)
Trusted Member

Message Removed: Please revisit board rules.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 4:18 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

Message Removed: Please revisit board rules.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 4:27 pm
STTsailor
(@STTsailor)
Trusted Member

EU youngsters do this all the time. Take a year off for backpacking through Asia. With proper planning and realistic expectations it can be done. it doesn't stop them from returning to the grind of adulthood.

I am meeting plenty of young pple sailing oceans by crewing on other pple boats. They do not make money but have minimal expenses. Attitude, right skill set and expectations is everything. Most American kids are enslaved to school/consumer debt. That is a real burden.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 4:50 pm
stxsailor
(@stxsailor)
Trusted Member

You're young, take the chance. But if you're running from something it will catch up to you. If anything it will be a good experience.If it works out great Even if it doesn't work out remember the words by Jimmy Buffett "If it doesn't work out there'll never be any doubt that the pleasure was worth all the pain" But remember it is not all palm trees and pina coladas. You will work alot to get by.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 4:57 pm
JohnnyU
(@JohnnyU)
Advanced Member

Post

Unfortunately this is fairly common with Millennials.

The common attitude is I want a 6 figure salary and work about 20hrs/week with no skills

(Not saying all but there is a significant number that have a sense of entitlement)

*Wrecks worldwide economy placing millennials in perpetual debt to pay for their entitlements*
*Claims that Millennials - the most educated, industrious generation in history - have a sense of entitlement*

Agree with the cartoon

Not sure how Millennials are paying for entitlements. GenX is carrying the freight

I guess when everyone gets a trophy, claiming that one's generation is the most industrious isn't a stretch

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Posted : January 19, 2016 5:16 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

Live your dream.
You're young and unencumbered.

While PR is a U.S. Commonwealth, it helps to be bilingual.
As for the other places you mentioned, you may need a work permit.
STT will be a better option.

Harder to find restaurant jobs in summer as that's slow season and it's pretty dead, touristwise until the end of Oct.
Be prepared for costs of moving/living here.
There are generally people on Craig's List that have rentals and or room/apt. shares. There's also job listings.

Hard to get around in STT without a car, especially if you end up working nights.

Good luck whatever you decide.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 5:17 pm
monogram
(@monogram)
Advanced Member

Nicole, I apologize on behalf of Virgin Islanders for the way you've been treated in this thread. It is apparent that the transplant boomers are out in force today.

Haha. I think these folks fall into the generation before the boomers generation. In this forum, I particularly enjoy reading their nostalgic memoirs about the price of gas and food some place in Kansas, in 1950s.

LOLLLLL

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Posted : January 19, 2016 5:46 pm
monogram
(@monogram)
Advanced Member

Agree with the cartoon

Not sure how Millennials are paying for entitlements. GenX is carrying the freight

I guess when everyone gets a trophy, claiming that one's generation is the most industrious isn't a stretch

Guess when everyone gets a pension and McMansion and highly subsidized healthcare they don't realize that the debt-saddled youth are (and will be) subsidizing it. The whole calculus behind Obamacare = young people who don't need it paying through the roof to subsidize the healthcare of their boomer overlords. It crashes without high youth enrollment.

College education these days is basically one big transfer of capital from poor millenials to boomer administrators. It's why Dr. Hall, like a true Boomer, gets his McMansion overlooking Brewers Bay and 350k salary while his students are in debt with no prospects.

I can go on, but you get my point. People wondering why millennials might be jaded should pay closer attention to what's going on.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 6:00 pm
snicole962
(@snicole962)
Active Member

This may sound harsh but if you are still in college I assume you are relatively young (say in your early 20's). If you are already "...sick of school and the whole concept of living to work..." I'm sorry to say that you have much bigger problems then moving to another location will solve.

I suggest that before you make any major decisions you get some professional counseling to help find out the root of why you have such a negative outlook toward life. Quite honestly it is not normal for a young person stating life's journey to sound so depressed.

Afriend....I am not depressed, I am a very happy person. You are a not so friendly person....I am not entitled, I work hard for everything I have and I do not mind busting my butt there to get by. When I was talking about being sick of the living to work I meant the world is so focused on money they don't take the time to enjoy the simple things in life. The saying working to live not living to work. Yeah money make things easier, but it isn't everything. I am graduating in a year and I love the ocean and I wanted to be closer to it. I love warm weather. I never thought it would be a cake walk and I am willing to bust my butt to get by, I simply came here asking for advice because it is a scary thought, but I also felt like it was worth the risk and adventure. I love traveling and adventure and I am not dating anyone or have kids so I thought the timing would be perfect...I didn't come here for you to call me depressed and be a rude asshole. I think you need to change your name to asshole instead of Afriend!

I am far from depressed I am just so sick of school, thank you for concern though! Next time try to be a little friendly to someone else post!

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Topic starter Posted : January 19, 2016 6:26 pm
snicole962
(@snicole962)
Active Member

It can be done but you will have to get creative. If you graduate from school w/o student loans, mortgage, car payments and manage to bring some cash savings with you until you find a job you will do fine here. If you are a skilled designer STT definitely needs these skills. I could not find anyone here to design my living room, pick colors, furniture. You could get gigs from realtors staging rentals or for sale properties. Plenty of tourists service, restaurant jobs otherwise.

Thank you for being kind!! I really appreciate it!! & Thank you for the advice!! 🙂

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : January 19, 2016 6:28 pm
snicole962
(@snicole962)
Active Member

Nicole, I apologize on behalf of Virgin Islanders for the way you've been treated in this thread. It is apparent that the transplant boomers are out in force today.

I applaud your willingness to move here! It can be expensive and the dating scene is terrible, especially on STX (see https://www.vimovingcenter.com/talk/read.php?4,60172,60191), but it can work if you're willing to be adventurous and work hard.

Like people have hinted at, scuba and other activities can be expensive, though as a young (presumably white) female, you should be able to find your way onto someone's boat at least a few times a month (took my friend about a half hour on STT before she was invited haha).

There is a serious "brain drain" of educated young people, so having more come down is always a good thing!

Thank you for so sweet!!!! & Thank you for the advice I appreciate it! I understand it can be expensive, but I would be willing to bust my butt. I am not entitled or depressed like everyone was calling me...Are most people there rude and mean...if so I might be reconsidering a new place...A more friendly place.

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Topic starter Posted : January 19, 2016 6:30 pm
snicole962
(@snicole962)
Active Member

Live your dream.
You're young and unencumbered.

While PR is a U.S. Commonwealth, it helps to be bilingual.
As for the other places you mentioned, you may need a work permit.
STT will be a better option.

Harder to find restaurant jobs in summer as that's slow season and it's pretty dead, touristwise until the end of Oct.
Be prepared for costs of moving/living here.
There are generally people on Craig's List that have rentals and or room/apt. shares. There's also job listings.

Hard to get around in STT without a car, especially if you end up working nights.

Good luck whatever you decide.

Thank you for being sweet!! I appreciate it! & Thank you for the advice!! 🙂 Glad to see not everyone is mean 🙂

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : January 19, 2016 6:36 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

It's unfortunate that you've latched on to one poster's comment which rubbed you the wrong way (but was actually a perfectly valid and helpful comment given your own wording) to respond with comments about people being rude and unfriendly.

Many of us have seen many, many, young people (hundreds in my case) such as yourself come and go with many leaving under very harsh circumstances when their preparation has been minimal and their expectations clouded to reality.

Hopefully you'll heed the warnings given, appreciate the fact that people HAVE taken the time to try and better prepare you - and spend the next year doing further research and saving money so that you can look forward to spending some time here with as few negatives as possible.

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Posted : January 19, 2016 6:52 pm
snicole962
(@snicole962)
Active Member

It's unfortunate that you've latched on to one poster's comment which rubbed you the wrong way (but was actually a perfectly valid and helpful comment given your own wording) to respond with comments about people being rude and unfriendly.

Many of us have seen many, many, young people (hundreds in my case) such as yourself come and go with many leaving under very harsh circumstances when their preparation has been minimal and their expectations clouded to reality.

Hopefully you'll heed the warnings given, appreciate the fact that people HAVE taken the time to try and better prepare you - and spend the next year doing further research and saving money so that you can look forward to spending some time here with as few negatives as possible.

I appreciate the advice. What I do not appreciate are people being rude and saying I am depressed and need psychiatric help and saying im entitled. I am researching over a year in advance and I am trying to prepare myself. Im not moving there out on a whim. Everyone was very helpful and the only people who I thought were rude and talking out of place were the ones who said I needed mental help and im entitled because I don't want to live to work and Im tired of school. There was no need for those comments. But thank you for your advice and taking the time to comment.

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Topic starter Posted : January 19, 2016 7:00 pm
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