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Flying kitty

 
kakalee
(@kakalee)
Advanced Member

Does anyone know which shots are required before my cat can get her health certificate to fly from US to STX?

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Topic starter Posted : July 23, 2013 1:30 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

Ask your vet and check with the airline.

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Posted : July 23, 2013 1:31 pm
JulieKay
(@JulieKay)
Trusted Member

American does not require a health certificate for pets traveling in the cabin at this time, according to their info page. But it doesn't hurt to have that health certificate!

Here's American's current pet policy page. Don't take my word for anything, read it thoroughly...

http://www.aa.com/i18n/travelInformation/specialAssistance/travelingWithPets.jsp?anchorEvent=false&from=Nav

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Posted : July 23, 2013 1:42 pm
maryb
(@maryb)
Advanced Member

The airlines may not require it, but I'm pretty sure the territory does. I have always had a health certificate for bringing my dog here and it has always been checked. I know several people who have gotten away with not having one but I personally wouldn't risk it. On this website, look under The Move tab, there is a section on pets.

Hope this helps!

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Posted : July 23, 2013 2:12 pm
JulieKay
(@JulieKay)
Trusted Member

Edited - read my last response below! *smiles* (when will they fix the smileys?)

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Posted : July 23, 2013 2:15 pm
JulieKay
(@JulieKay)
Trusted Member

Also don't forget to buy a VI pet license. You can purchase them online now:

http://www.stcroixawc.org/pet-licenses/

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Posted : July 23, 2013 2:18 pm
JulieKay
(@JulieKay)
Trusted Member

Aha! Found this:

"All dogs and cats upon entering the Virgin Islands shall be accompanied by an official health certificate stating that the animal did not originate from an area quarantined for rabies. All dogs and cats must have been vaccinated for rabies within 6 months prior to the date of shipment except those dogs and cats less than 8 weeks old. The certificate of vaccination for rabies must be attached to the official health certificate."

That said, I don't know when/where you show the certificate? I took my dog to the vet when I first moved here and just handed over all his records.

(yes I'm currently laid up with an injured foot so I'm bored today posting!)

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Posted : July 23, 2013 2:20 pm
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert

i would have one just to be safe. when i brought mine, they did not check. but i am glad i had it

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Posted : July 23, 2013 2:44 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

Best to have your cat vaccinated as we do have large stray cat populations and cat diseases such as those below listed:

Feline Leukemia Virus

Feline leukemia is a disease that spreads through urine, nose discharge and saliva. Cats can catch the disease through bites, sharing food and water bowls, and from simply living together. Mother cats can pass the disease along to their kittens, and kittens are more likely to contract the disease than adult cats.

Some cats will immediately become ill upon contracting the virus; however, in other cats, symptoms of the disease will not manifest for several weeks. Feline leukemia can result in a number of conditions, including system-wide infections, diarrhea, skin infections, eye disease, respiratory tract infections, bladder infections, infertility, anemia and cancer. Any severe chronic illness can be a sign of feline leukemia.

Although there is no cure for feline leukemia, the disease is easily preventable. Keeping cats indoors, restricting exposure to other cats, maintaining a clean living environment and ensuring your cat is vaccinated can all help prevent feline leukemia. According to the Merck Veterinary Manual, veterinarians rarely see cases of feline leukemia among vaccinated cat populations.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), sexual contact is not a major factor in transmitting feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). It primarily spreads through bite wounds, and outdoor cats and territorial tomcats are most susceptible to infection. However, unlike feline leukemia, casual contact through sharing food and water bowls doesn't significantly the increase risk of contracting FIV. Although a mother cat may pass the virus along to her kittens, this happens rarely.

Once the virus enters the bloodstream, it can remain dormant until it progresses into an active disease. FIV is terminal, and because it targets the immune system, cats that have the disease run an increased risk of enlarged lymph nodes, ulcers of the tongue, inflamed gums, progressive weight loss, poor coat and skin disease, diarrhea, anemia, eye disease and cancer.

To prevent FIV, keep your cat indoors and up to date on vaccinations. According to CatHealth.com, vaccinating for this virus after your cat is at least 8 weeks old can prevent infection about 60 to 80 percent of the time after three doses. Be sure to have bite wounds treated immediately to prevent serious infections.

While we do not have rabies in the VI, since you are bringing in an animals from the states, you will be required to have a rabies vaccination.
Your veterinarian will know what vaccinations will be necessary to travel with your pet.
Get your pet used to being in a travel case before the trip and ask about sedation, if necessary.

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Posted : July 23, 2013 2:59 pm
kakalee
(@kakalee)
Advanced Member

Thanks Julie Kay,
Your info should help the transition be smooth.

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Topic starter Posted : July 24, 2013 1:49 pm
maryb
(@maryb)
Advanced Member

They airlines should/will look at the paperwork. Some airlines or flights ignore it some dont. Its better to be prepared. Like I said, its not the airlines that requires it but your destination.

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Posted : July 24, 2013 3:58 pm
AandA2VI
(@AandA2VI)
Trusted Member

American does not require a health certificate for pets traveling in the cabin at this time, according to their info page. But it doesn't hurt to have that health certificate!

Here's American's current pet policy page. Don't take my word for anything, read it thoroughly...

http://www.aa.com/i18n/travelInformation/specialAssistance/travelingWithPets.jsp?anchorEvent=false&from=Nav/blockquote >

NM

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Posted : July 28, 2013 4:40 am
kakalee
(@kakalee)
Advanced Member

Thanks julie kay,
I want to be really perfect about her flight & arrival, without too much risk of her being over vaccinated. Seems to me VI requires a rabies booster, even if the airline does not, & a licence even though that is rare for cats, since they are rightly considered not domestic in many places. I sure hope I'm not missing something...

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Topic starter Posted : July 28, 2013 2:37 pm
JulieKay
(@JulieKay)
Trusted Member

You could also contact a vet here before you travel to ask questions. We use Kasey at Progressive at 340-718-1256. They're very helpful and would be happy to answer your questions. There are several good vets here to choose from.

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Posted : July 28, 2013 3:29 pm
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