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Fruit & Vegetable Exports

 
Farpoint
(@Farpoint)
Active Member

Here is a question I haven't tried to answer before... We have some friends from off-island visiting... and they wanted to know what the restrictions for taking some fresh fruit home with them... ie. Avocado or Bread Fruit.

A quick web search through Customs was no help...

Thanks

Quote
Topic starter Posted : January 26, 2008 10:09 pm
Jules
(@Jules)
Trusted Member

Not sure, and it's been a while since I've flown out/in, but I think there is something on the customs form that you fill out at the airport that asks if you are carrying any agriculture products, etc. I'm guessing that if they ask that question, it's a no-no to have them.

Maybe you could swing by the airport and pick up one of those forms. There are usually stacks of them at the ticket counters.

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Posted : January 26, 2008 10:16 pm
Juanita
(@Juanita)
Expert

Not an authority on the subject, but I have tried to take fresh fruit on the plane, and had it taken away at the St. Thomas airport. The funny thing is it was a banana with a Dole sticker on it, so it was obviously the same thing that would be in a US supermarket, but still no go.

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Posted : January 26, 2008 10:16 pm
Lizard
(@Lizard)
Trusted Member

US Customs not TSA will take all Fruit you attempt to bring back to the mainland. The funny thing is you can bring in but not out! (Go Figure).

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Posted : January 26, 2008 10:39 pm
Juanita
(@Juanita)
Expert

I always bring stuff back, especially cherries from Oregon, when I'm out there in late June/July. My husband ran into trouble bringing jelly filled Krispy Kremes. He stood his ground and handed a few out as bribes and managed to get most of them home. That was a Homeland Security issue. I guess the jelly is a liquid, but wouldn't a donut be a three ounce container? (smiley)

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Posted : January 26, 2008 11:42 pm
Betty
(@Betty)
Trusted Member

Agriculture, which is part of Customs and Border Protection at the airport will not let you take fruit because of our bugs, microscopic and large, like fruit flys.

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Posted : January 27, 2008 12:23 pm
Lizard
(@Lizard)
Trusted Member

Betty,
I understand the law and maybe the logic. this happened to me. US Customs made me turn my apple in, OK ! That's the law. I clear Customs and TSA, put my shoes back on, walk over to the little food stand they have at the Air Port and buy an apple. So as I said before (go figure).

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Posted : January 27, 2008 12:41 pm
Betty
(@Betty)
Trusted Member

Lizard, not attacking you or the logic, just answering the question. And anything "fresh or raw" is likely to get picked up, but prepared food or packaged food is most likely not going to get picked up. The jelly donut thing was funny, kinda like putting a file in a prison cake. They always get my bottled water because I always forget tsa is going to take it.

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Posted : January 27, 2008 1:17 pm
beachy
(@beachy)
Trusted Member

There is a list on the federal website, but offhand I don't know the location. It details the allowable/not allowable items of food etc. This is CBP, not TSA. You are allowed to take back citrus (always surprises me, with all the issues FL has with mites etc), sometimes they examine the fruit, when I carry limes from my tree. Believe avocado is also allowed, but mangoes are forbidden..as are apples, etc. They took my custard apple once, but that was cause TSA got hysterical when they saw it in my carry-on, and went to ask CBP. So much a factor of who is working the desk...mostly I don't get asked any questions, but will check the fruit box on the form when I carry the limes- not looking for issues if they were to find it, especially when they are legal.
We're having a stx TSA issue, with frozen Lurpack butter. They claim it is a gel. Problem with checking it is sometimes the luggage doesn't arrive for a day or two longer. Frozen and well packed, it arrives frozen after 7 or so hours of traveling.

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Posted : January 27, 2008 4:07 pm
magalycn
(@magalycn)
Active Member

Here is an official list of approved fresh fruits, herbs, and vegetables directly from Agriculture CBP
There is more information at the CBP office at the airport of STX—Authority 7CFR 318.58:

Allium spp.
Aloe vera (above ground
parts)
Amaranth, Amaranthus
spp. (leaf, stem)
Anise
Annona spp. (leaf)
Arracacia xanthorrhiza
Arrowroot
Artichoke, Jerusalem
Asparagus
Avocado
Balsam apple
Bamboo shoots
Banana (fruit, leaf without
stalk or midrib)
Basil
Bay laurel
Beans, in pods* (faba,
lima, string)
Beans, shelled (faba, lima,
string)
Beet
Bitter melon
Brassica oleracea
Breadfruit, Artocarpus spp.
Breadnut
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Cacao bean pod
Cannonball fruit,
Cantaloupe
Carrot
Cassava
Cauliflower
Celery
Chamomile, Anthemis spp.
Chayote
Chervil
Chicory
Chinese waternut
Chrysanthemum spp. (leaf,
stem)
Cilantro
Citrus
Coconut
Collard
Corn–on–the–cob
Cornsalad, Valerianella spp.
Cucumber, includes Angola
cucumber, Sicania
odorata
Cyperus corm
Dandelion greens (leaf,
stem)
Dasheen, Colocasia,
Caladium spp., and
Xanthosoma spp.
Edible flowers, **
(inflorescences only)
Eggplant
Endive
Ethrog (fruit)
False coriander
Fennel
Garlic cloves, peeled
Genip
Ginger root
Gourd
Grapefruit
Guava, (leaf)
Honeydew melon
Horseradish, Armoracia
spp.
Indigo, Indigofera spp.
(leaf)
Jackfruit
Kale
Kudzu
Lambsquarter,
Lemon (fruit)
Lemongrass, Cymbopogon
citratus
Leren
Lettuce
Lily bulb, edible
Lime (fruit)
Lotus root
Maguey
Mango T102-a from PR;
prohibited from VI
*)
Mangosteen
Marjoram, Origanum spp.
(leaf, stem)
Mint, Mentha spp.
Mushrooms
Mustard greens
Okra**
Orange (fruit)
Oregano, Origanum spp.
(leaf, stem)
Palm heart
Papaya
Parsley
Parsnip
Peas, in pod or shelled,
Pisum sativum
Pepper
Pigeon pea (pod or shelled
from Puerto Rico),
T101-k-2 or T101-k-2-1
Pigeon pea, in pods1 from
USVI
Pigeon pea, shelled from
USVI
Pineapple
Plantain (fruit, leaf without
stalk or midrib)
Pokeweek greens, (leaf,
stem)
Pomegranate arils

Potato
Pumpkin
Purslane
Radish
Rhubarb
Rosemary (leaf)
Rutabaga
St. John's bread
Salsify
Savoy
Sorrel, Rumex spp.
Spinach
Squash
Stinking–toe (pod)
Strawberry
Sweet potato
****
T101-b-3-1
Sweet potato (leaf only)
Swiss chard
Tamarind bean pod
Taro, Colocasia and
Caladium spp.
Tarragon
Thyme
Tomato
Truffle
Turnip
Vegetable marrow
Water-chestnut
Watercress
Watermelon
Yam, Dioscorea spp.
Yautia (tanier),
Xanthosoma spp.

* Use Table 1 on next page
** Limited to Calendula spp. (pot marigold), johnny-jump-ups, pansies, and violets).
If stems or leaves are attached, refuse to certify movement.
*Mangoes are also prohibited movement from the Virgin Islands into Puerto Rico
**Use Table 2 on next page
The edible, fleshy, juicy, red colored cover of individual pomegranate seeds that entirely envelopes the seed.
****If moving to a North Atlantic (NA) location, then allow movement under a Riverdale issued permit for fumigation at port of
arrival.

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Posted : January 27, 2008 6:13 pm
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