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Hurricane lessons: Hugo and Marilyn

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RandyNTaj
(@RandyNTaj)
Advanced Member

What did you learn from Hugo and/or Marilyn?
Do you think government or the infrastructure learned anything?
If something similar were approaching now...how would you do it differently?
What would you tell someone new to the island about surviving/preparing for before, during and after?

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Topic starter Posted : September 16, 2014 11:17 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

1. That material possessions aren't as important as you think they are. That your ability to learn and grow and use the grey matter between your ears is the most precious thing you possess. That a good sense of humor is essential to a healthy life and to survival of the bad things that happen.

2. Building codes were tightened after Hugo and further tightened after Marilyn - which was a good t'ing.

3. No differently really.

4. Don't treat any incoming storm as a joke but don't start bleating about it and wringing your hands either. Everybody's nervous so don't act the fool. You shouldn't be rushing around at the last minute grabbing every last battery and canned tin of beans from the grocery store because you should have a basic preparedness kit in your home at all times - hurricane season or not. The lists are printed every year at the beginning of hurricane season and document everything you need for you, your family and your animals - and how to store them in case your place gets very wet.

If you're all prepared with only last-minute things to do while waiting to see if the storm's going to impact or slide off, help that elderly or infirm neighbor move stuff that needs to be moved out of harm's way.

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Posted : September 16, 2014 11:31 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

I do my prep in May.
I am sure you can find many threads on this forum that will answer your ALL questions.
Basic is be prepared for the worst and grateful for the least.

You survive and grow......or you don't.

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Posted : September 16, 2014 11:41 pm
noOne
(@noOne)
Trusted Member

I'd suggest finding a home with concrete walls to weather the storm out in.

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Posted : September 17, 2014 6:08 am
sunshinefun
(@sunshinefun)
Trusted Member

Own a reliable generator.

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Posted : September 17, 2014 12:09 pm
Phizz
(@Phizz)
Advanced Member

To understand and share the memories of Hugo on St. Croix visit Allawe-Remembering Hugo at the Botanical Garden this Sunday noon to 4. People will be sharing their experiences, and the displays of damage and recovery will take you way past the thugs and the looting. So many survived the storm with dignity and grace, sharing meager resources, and many think that our community was actually strengthened by the shared disaster.

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Posted : September 17, 2014 12:13 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

Keep cash on hand as no power, no credit card use and after a severe storm many places won't take checks. After Hugo/Marilyn even banks were not cashing checks in excess of $250. Power was out for months with both Hugo & Marilyn.

There is a thread on hurricane preparedness on this site from last year so try to find and it'll answer things that people don't consider like having your enough meds for yourself or pets, keeping full tanks of gas during hurricane season and extra gas for vehicles, generators, etc.

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Posted : September 17, 2014 1:36 pm
noOne
(@noOne)
Trusted Member

There is a thread on hurricane preparedness on this site from last year so try to find and it'll answer things that people don't consider like having your enough meds for yourself or pets, keeping full tanks of gas during hurricane season and extra gas for vehicles, generators, etc.

Add to this in Website Updades thread:

Your search engine only goes so far back in date... not sure how far, but i looks very short to me, especially since I searched for "bank" and received only two pages of results back.

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Posted : September 17, 2014 7:05 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

You need to change the search dates to get all old posts. The default is one year.

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Posted : September 17, 2014 7:23 pm
Petra
(@Petra)
Advanced Member

Thanks OT! I have been overlooking that field sometimes and cannot find what I need since I only searched the past year.

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Posted : September 17, 2014 7:57 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

Wear/have handy a heavy pair of shoes (not open sandals or flip-flops). There WILL be all sorts of debris and you do not want to get an injury and infection.

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Posted : September 17, 2014 8:20 pm
CruzanIron
(@cruzaniron)
Expert

Since no one else will say it, I will.

Having a gun will be handy.

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Posted : September 17, 2014 8:21 pm
janeinstx
(@janeinstx)
Trusted Member

Since no one else will say it, I will.

Having a gun will be handy.

DITTO

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Posted : September 17, 2014 8:24 pm
RandyNTaj
(@RandyNTaj)
Advanced Member

I could fish the older posts, yes, but I wanted some fresher perspectives.....more recent thoughts than something that may have been the frame of mind in past.

All valid ideas on several levels--- including the personal protection items. Better safe than sorry, best defense is a good offense...and all that.

Thank you all, very much, for your perspectives.

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Topic starter Posted : September 17, 2014 10:37 pm
islandboy
(@islandboy)
Advanced Member

While there may be a ton of rain during a hurricane, and your cisterns will likely be overflowing, a water filter such as a Katadyn Combi or Hiker Pro would be a great thing to have on hand as that cistern may likely also be contaminated. Everyone should have a go bag with at least 5 days of supplies to provide water, fire, food and shelter, followed by security and comms like a hand held shortwave radio.

A desalinating water filter, while very expensive would be great to have as well. Never been through a hurricane but these items cover most situations.

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Posted : September 18, 2014 1:52 am
Scubadoo
(@Scubadoo)
Trusted Member

Hugo- 25 years.

Those water sterilization tablets are probably the thing to have. A full propane tank for your gas grill, if you've got some food to go with it, and a generator to keep it from going bad.

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Posted : September 18, 2014 2:48 am
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

While there may be a ton of rain during a hurricane, and your cisterns will likely be overflowing, a water filter such as a Katadyn Combi or Hiker Pro would be a great thing to have on hand as that cistern may likely also be contaminated.

"Old school" procedure is to block your cistern downspout if a hurricane comes through. A"normal" heavy rain usually isn't an issue but in a major storm debris starts flying and crud gets in there. Afterwards throw an extra cup of bleach in there.

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Posted : September 18, 2014 12:34 pm
Dante
(@dante)
Advanced Member

While there may be a ton of rain during a hurricane, and your cisterns will likely be overflowing, a water filter such as a Katadyn Combi or Hiker Pro would be a great thing to have on hand as that cistern may likely also be contaminated.

"Old school" procedure is to block your cistern downspout if a hurricane comes through. A"normal" heavy rain usually isn't an issue but in a major storm debris starts flying and crud gets in there. Afterwards throw an extra cup of bleach in there.

LoI…I have "special" sponges that I have set aside (one for each downspout) that I don’t use for anything else, just to close off the cistern 🙂

In addition to the debris / salt that could contaminate the cistern, it could also overflow into the house.

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Posted : September 18, 2014 1:57 pm
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert

all of those "old perspectives" on preparedness still hold true today

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Posted : September 18, 2014 2:32 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

I could fish the older posts, yes, but I wanted some fresher perspectives.....more recent thoughts than something that may have been the frame of mind in past. 1

Took the words right out of my mouth, Spee1dy.
Those older posts are what is still used today, will be great advice 10 yrs. from now and for many newcomers who have not experienced the devastation of a Hugo and a Marilyn. Don't be too quick to turn your noses up at them.They are valid and well worth looking up.

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Posted : September 18, 2014 5:17 pm
RandyNTaj
(@RandyNTaj)
Advanced Member

I wasn't turning my nose up at them. What I was seeking was a present-state-of-mind response to the question. I appreciate everything that was said.

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Topic starter Posted : September 19, 2014 5:20 pm
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert

it still holds true, what has been said in the past and please again i stress no hurricane parties. i know someone who almost lost his life in the keys during a hurricane while he was drunk

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Posted : September 19, 2014 5:23 pm
CruzanIron
(@cruzaniron)
Expert

Heck, it was so long ago now that we might not remember any more.
I learned that I won't starve if I am near the ocean.
There are enough cisterns around so I won't die of thirst.

I was ready for the most part.

My kit includes suture kits and medicines for infection.
A survival knife. Fishing gear. A motorcycle (great for blocked roads).

Beyond that, I learned from Hugo that we can survive and move on,
and if a hurricane is going to hit us and it is not as strong or moving as slow
as Hugo, I don't stress myself about it.

We've moved past Hugo. Life goes on.

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Posted : September 19, 2014 5:30 pm
noOne
(@noOne)
Trusted Member

Hey Cruz, I know of some (very few) wells and one natural spring on STT, besides the rain forest on STX, are there wells/springs of fresh water?

Edit: the spring (or rain runoff probably) is located on the side of one of the main roads on the North side of STT. Perhaps someone can elaborate?

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Posted : September 19, 2014 6:34 pm
CruzanIron
(@cruzaniron)
Expert

Not that I am aware of.

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Posted : September 19, 2014 6:43 pm
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