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Island Ed
(@Island_Ed)
Advanced Member

LOL.. Noone, I guess you are not as memorable as you believe yourself to be.
Happens to me occasionally to, but is typical when someone hasn't seen you for at least 7 years.

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Posted : August 7, 2006 1:41 pm
Anonymous
 Anonymous
(@Anonymous)
Guest

"Last time I was on the island I was down at Magens with a friend of mine (a native) and his son.”

So do you or don’t you have any friends who are locals in the VI? Your recent post that I refer to is in this thread and indicates you do not. But you did 4 months ago, so what happened?"

He is a Frenchie. Not all locals are black you know...

"LOL.. Noone, I guess you are not as memorable as you believe yourself to be.
Happens to me occasionally to, but is typical when someone hasn't seen you for at least 7 years."

I did not think it was pertinent to mention that she had a crush on me, and even approached me for sex on more than one occasion. I would think that would qualify as memorable.

"If you can't post anything positive about the USVI after 10 years of living here"

The weather and beaches are beautiful. That's about it.

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Posted : August 7, 2006 2:14 pm
STT Resident
(@STT_Resident)
Trusted Member

Let us all just feel sorry for poor noone who after having lived here for nine years as a child, obviously had very few friends even then, has miserable memories he wants to share and now lives stateside where he has just a "few" friends "including some black people." To be so young and bitter must be quite a cross to bear, the poor soul!

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Posted : August 7, 2006 2:30 pm
Anonymous
 Anonymous
(@Anonymous)
Guest

I did not ask for your sympathy, I am just providing a point of view of the Virgin Islands that most people seem to deny. My friends are loyal to me, as I am to them - that is my definition of a friend. Of course I have many associates and people that I speak to on a regular basis, which I do not qualify as a "friends."

I guess my opinion is invalid, because:

a) I am not a native
b) I do not live there now
c) my experiences were "bad" and therefor not valid.

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Posted : August 7, 2006 3:12 pm
Teresa
(@Teresa)
Trusted Member

Noone,

The board is interested in your experiences and actually would like to know more - good and bad. What we don't appreciate is your bad attitude.

Teresa

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Posted : August 7, 2006 4:35 pm
Richard N. Kurpiers
 Richard N. Kurpiers
(@Richard N. Kurpiers)
Guest

I've seen and lived both sides of this issue. As a white child there were many hard lessons I learned while growing up in Contant behind the old Michelle Motel - the only white boy within miles unless you counted those in Frenchtown. To this day I remember the racially laced tirade my 3rd grade teacher Ms. Francis went into when I incorrectly wrote a cursive "w" on the board - explaining it was the way my mother wrote it. I remember all too well the many times I was called "white cheese" and had rocks hurled at me as I walked the roads from Nisky Demonstration to home after school. Things improved a little when I started attending Sts. Peter and Paul in 5th grade, but I was still hassled many times walking the road along the cemetery to and from school every day. To avoid getting beat up meant running faster than my attackers that day (mostly kids from Wayne Aspinall).

It wasn't until I started attending College of the Virgin Islands that the lessons finally had their impact. It meant changing my personality. It also helped that I had become so adept at speaking like a local that I was often mistaken for a Frenchy. To get along without incident in the Virgin Islands as a white person means learning to be self-effacing. Brashness and being unabashed, unless among close friends, will get you into trouble with locals who don't know you. Since I learned that lesson I have never had one incident in the 20+ years I have been returning to the V.I. each year for vacation. And as I said before, speaking "calypso", perfect calypso, goes a long way in being treated like you belonged in the V.I.

For whatever that's worth....

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Posted : August 7, 2006 6:38 pm
STT Resident
(@STT_Resident)
Trusted Member

Loved your post, Richard Kurpiers, not only for the historical perspective but about learning the talk.

Over two decades ago when I moved to STT I didn't understand much of what was being said around me and was gobsmacked when a white person who grew up here suddenly lapsed into the local speech pattern. My first "big event" in speech happened about six months after I moved here and some young locals tried to cut me off at an intersection where I clearly had the right of way.

As I cut THEM off, the driver hurled all kinds of racist epithets in my direction. I slowed down, leaned out of my window and yelled, "Go scatter yo' ass, m'son!" Their faces registered total disbelief and I just roared with laughter.

I can talk with the best of them now but only exercise it when REALLY angry or else just in fun or to make a point. I can suck my teeth very well and so subtely sometimes that only an oldtimer knows I'm doing it and that's sometimes cause for a wink and a nod.

Cheers!

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Posted : August 7, 2006 7:09 pm
Linda J
(@Linda_J)
Expert

I was under the impression that the term "Frenchie" is derogatory and not used in polite conversation. Am I incorrect? It is not a term I have heard used on STX.

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Posted : August 7, 2006 7:59 pm
Anonymous
 Anonymous
(@Anonymous)
Guest

I do miss sailing, the trade winds are unparalleled in the world. I think the Baths is the most beautiful place on the planet. I miss diving - last time I went, some tourist thought the Rhone (that we dived on) was "nothing but a pile of junk on the floor of the ocean" lol

I am disturbed with the coral dying. I think this is a real bad sign.

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Posted : August 7, 2006 8:04 pm
dntw8up
(@dntw8up)
Trusted Member

Hi LJ.

Frenchie is used on STT to refer to...Frenchies, folks from the Frenchtown area of the island. It is not a derogatory term used here but I wouldn't go to Martinique and start calling people Frenchies! 😀

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Posted : August 7, 2006 8:54 pm
jane
 jane
(@jane)
Trusted Member

I think I shall start using "go scatter yo' ass" up here in the Pac NW - I love it!!
Perhaps it will catch on.

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Posted : August 7, 2006 8:58 pm
HipCrip
(@HipCrip)
Trusted Member

Island Ed,

When I see/speak to someone I haven't seen in seven years, the most typical response I've heard after politely re-introducing myself is, "Wow, I thought you were dead!" It's really a funny conversation starter once you know if the old acquaintance thinks it's a good thing that you aren't.

--HC

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Posted : August 7, 2006 10:47 pm
Island Ed
(@Island_Ed)
Advanced Member

Noone...lol

If you DID NOT have sex with her, there is no event to be memorable for her, and it is understandable.

If you DID have sex with her, and it was not memorable, it is HILARIOUS!

ROFLOL

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Posted : August 9, 2006 2:01 am
ken
 ken
(@ken)
Active Member

Blu,

Sorry to be so late to read your post, but I must say that you have certainly shown a spotlight on this issue for this newbee. I understand you and believe you are right .

I would hasten to add, like others here have said before, that common respect for people can do much to ease tensions and promote harmony regardless of race or class.

Great post!

Ken

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Posted : September 30, 2006 5:04 am
danieljude
(@danieljude)
Advanced Member

I find this all very interesting, and much of it true, but with varying degrees of personal truth for me. In a similar discussion awhile back, Becky R mentioned that because I have a visible disability, I was more easily accepted and/or provided with hospitality from the W. Indian people. At first I was aghast at that, however I have watched more closely and have noticed that this often does open the door, and sometimes literally!

As far as the wariness, I find that with anyone who has lived here a significant period of time. I don't find race to be an issue there. I do think some of that has to do with the coming and going of so many people, and in this case, predominantly white. Just as in Southern Mexico, I had to work in a way to let folks know that I am not going anywhere. This seemed to be a key issue in my neighborhood, which is predominantly West Indian and approximately 1/3 Spanish speaking.

I have heard talk of the grandson of a slave routine (from white folks speaking about more negative experiences). I don't buy into that one at all. To date, only one person has mentioned that, and I countered with my heritage being of people who in the 20th century had to emmigrate from Ireland as TB and starvation were rampant, and the feudal system was still well in place. That sort of ended any voilins from playing prior to the bow reaching the instrument.

A final note reflects back on Becky's statement again about being aloof. That I see as being a cultural difference. People whom have spent their entire lives together as one racial, ethnic and familiar group I would imagine wonders as much about our expectations and customs as we do theirs. Even within the continuous 48, there are vast differences in what is acceptable and what is not. Jane: How I learned that one living in the deep south! A New York City fellow was ebraced about as closely as a porcupine.

So far, I have taken one person at a time, as a person and not as a group of any sort. It has been a wonderful experience, and after the cool period, there can be great warmth. I am fortunate to not have had BeckyR's experience, as I am aware of it, and it certainly would have clouded or slanted my view on things. She was dealing with a nasty, hateful, spiteful old biddy (biddy is not the word I am actually thinking, but for board purposes....). I am also glad that I have some very warm relationships to offset any nastiness that might ever arise in the future.

Am looking forward to see how this unfolds, and thank you to EVERYBODY for keeping this a really great conversation and not letting it slide.

Dan

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Posted : September 30, 2006 11:01 am
Marcus
 Marcus
(@Marcus)
Guest

Seems to me that hip"CRIP" is a play on the word cripple.....so its ok when you use it but not someone else????
C'mon....

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Posted : September 30, 2006 4:29 pm
jane
 jane
(@jane)
Trusted Member

You are absolutely right, Marcus.

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Posted : October 2, 2006 2:30 am
dntw8up
(@dntw8up)
Trusted Member

Marcus, jane,

Black individuals who refer to themselves as n***** do so to assert control over a word that has historically had negative connotations. White individuals are not welcome to use that word because their use of the word to refer to blacks is the basis for the negative connotation.

Physically impaired individuals may refer to themselves as cripples to assert control over a word that has historically had negative connotations. Those without physical impairments are not welcome to use that word because their use of the word to refer to physically impaired individuals is the basis for the negative connotation.

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Posted : October 2, 2006 3:46 pm
promoguy
(@promoguy)
Advanced Member

Actually the blacks that I know DO NOT use the 'N' word. Check out those that use it, rap/hip hop/gansta and you'll definitely see it's not attempt to take control of a word. I doubt if you'd ever hear Kenneth Chennault, Russell Simmons or even Oprah Winfrey use the word.

I think you're being a tad politically correct.

Marcus is straight on, but I'll bet he's not a guy that goes around being politically correct. Makes him okay in my book.

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Posted : October 2, 2006 5:05 pm
Becky R
(@Becky_R)
Trusted Member

So has anyone noted that Hip Crip has not weighed in for more than 6 weeks? Lighten up folks - this is one seriously ill person....why don't we worry more about what has happened with HC than dragging up an old post...Marcus, Promoguy - sorry, you came to the party a little too late...

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Posted : October 2, 2006 6:24 pm
promoguy
(@promoguy)
Advanced Member

Actually I've been at the party, but unfortunately without a date.

My comments were directed at a comment on the controllability (sic) of a word. Maybe HipCrip's computer isn't working and that's why there hasn't been a post.

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Posted : October 2, 2006 9:45 pm
jane
 jane
(@jane)
Trusted Member

Dan and I were just wondering what had happened to Hip Crip.

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Posted : October 3, 2006 3:45 am
Linda J
(@Linda_J)
Expert

When Penny doesn't post, it almost always means she can't because she is ill. I hope she's back with us soon.

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Posted : October 4, 2006 9:38 am
Anonymous
 Anonymous
(@Anonymous)
Guest

Every newbie and longterm resident that I have met, has stories of locals being rude to them-myself included. I knew racism and inefficiency could or would be new problems in my new life. So for me it's about not having expectations. When I go to the bank I expect it will take an hour. If I fly through the line in fifteen minutes I'm thrilled. I always say my Good bla bla blas... and don't expect anything back. If they smile and greet me back I am delighted. If someone buds in front of me in line, I let them know I was next. It works for me, it's the way I deal with the new issues in my new life. Every place you live has its problems and issues. Besides does "paradise" really exist?

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Posted : October 6, 2006 7:09 pm
terry
(@terry)
Expert

I guess we're lucky. We don't live on island, but own a condo and have spent a total of 12 weeks in 4 trips. So far we have NOT encountered any rude locals. In fact twice when in line at the store with only a couple of things, a local let us go ahead of them.
I'm sure that there are unpleasant people out there, it's just our good fortune that we haven't met them yet.

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Posted : October 6, 2006 9:35 pm
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