Notifications
Clear all

liveaboard  

 

doc
 doc
(@doc)
Advanced Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 36
April 30, 2014 10:38 pm  

Hello. Would anyone like to share their experiences and thoughts of the benefits/pitfalls of living on a boat either at a marina or on a mooring?


Quote
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 8775
May 1, 2014 12:26 am  

i lived on a boat in florida. i am a female? not sure if that matters. but i did not like it very much. i need more room for me and my hobby.
i need a kitchen bigger than 4 ' long. i love to bake. the second boat we lived on was much better size wise, but i was so glad to get ack on dry land. we were docked and not on a mooring


ReplyQuote
doc
 doc
(@doc)
Advanced Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 36
May 1, 2014 1:39 am  

tx speedy1. male/female couple here. don't think you being female matters! ha! 4ft cooking not much! looking at a trawler type boat, higher/wider than a sail boat but still restricted in space obviously.


ReplyQuote
polemicturtle
(@polemicturtle)
Active Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 12
May 1, 2014 1:59 am  

Unless you intend to live on a houseboat, its most analogous to living in a RV or a tiny house. So there can be a lot of downside, with the upside being your house can move you to new and exciting locations all over the world.

You may find that cruising catamarans in the 30-40 ft range that you find appealing.

My favorite online authors on the subject go by Sue & Larry and their articles can still be found on the Sailnet archives here: http://www.sailnet.com/forums/cruising-articles/20259-cruising-life%97how-get-started.html

It might not be exactly what you are looking for but it gives you a good feel about living aboard.


ReplyQuote
stxer
(@stxer)
Advanced Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 184
May 1, 2014 2:32 am  

I have never lived on a boat. However, I have visited and spend time with friends who do. First...If you have never sailed and been on a boat long term...don't even consider it.

If you are a sailor, you understand what it is like. Some people think it is just like being in a "small" apartment... it is not.... Remember you need to get back and forth from shore to your boat. and... You need to provide refrigeration, power, toilets, and food from a remote location.
.
Lots of problems...but if that is who you are. do it....If not ..go find an apartment.


ReplyQuote
IslandHops
(@IslandHops)
Trusted Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 929
May 1, 2014 11:53 am  

We lived aboard when we first moved to STX. Green Cay Marina was the only real option with great amenities. Having a regular job and wanting to integrate into the community made it more convenient to be tied to the shore (as opposed to the more isolated existence of living on the hook). Whatever boat you decide upon make sure you have plenty of shaded outdoor space. That is where you spend your time - not necessarily below.

If you love boats/boating then living aboard is a great option. But given the expense of dockage, renting a small place can be a better option if you are moving here to work and live a regular life and are not already committed to a boating lifestyle.

Living on a boat is a good way to simplify your life. Given the space available, each bit of kit you have must have a purpose or be treasured. Great way to become a minimalist.


ReplyQuote
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 8775
May 1, 2014 12:02 pm  

first boat we lived on was a grand banks ( 35' ) second was a 45' alden. I think thats the correct name. the alden was better, but the galley was still so tine even though this had full size fridge and apt size oven. still just too small


ReplyQuote
Alana33
(@Alana33)
Expert
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 12275
May 1, 2014 12:05 pm  

Living aboard a boat is a lifestyle. If you are not already living on a yacht or have never done so, previously then you may find it confining.
If you have done so in the past, then it's a no brainer. There are systems to maintain on a boat whether living on a dock or on a mooring.
If you are already an experienced sailor, it should be no problem. You didn't give enough information to know your situation. The only way to know if you'll like something is to try it. Nice thing about boats is that if you don't like your neighbor, you can always move your home.


ReplyQuote
Juanita
(@Juanita)
Expert
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 3111
May 1, 2014 10:57 pm  

http://www.cygnus3.com/how-to-liveaboard-a-boat/

Enjoy this tongue 'n cheek account of how to liveaboard, but remember......it's all TRUE!! LOL

Hubby and I lived aboard for years. Some "special moments", both good and bad, but would do it again in a heartbeat if we were younger and still able to handle it.

It's not for everyone, but if it clicks with you, it can be the best time of your life.


ReplyQuote
janeinstx
(@janeinstx)
Trusted Member
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 666
May 1, 2014 11:12 pm  

In the words of Gary, "how do you feel about dying?"


ReplyQuote
Juanita
(@Juanita)
Expert
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 3111
May 2, 2014 1:48 am  

In the words of Gary, "how do you feel about dying?"

Yep, that's exactly what he asked me!

Actually, come to think of it, I think what he said was, "Are you afraid to die?".

@doc, Don't let the above bother you. It's not THAT dangerous.:)


ReplyQuote
donefarming
(@donefarming)
Advanced Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 174
May 2, 2014 11:39 am  

doc, we know several people who have been living aboard for years. Some for 10+ years and all of them love it. Plus boaters have a great "family" group and have become great friends! Network and you can make great friends at the very least 😉

Enjoy your adventure 🙂


ReplyQuote
Alana33
(@Alana33)
Expert
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 12275
May 2, 2014 12:02 pm  

I lived on boats for many years and loved it. At one point, we lived on a small 26 ft. boat (our first) with 2 very large dogs out at anchor.
I designed a detachable ramp which my significant other built so the dogs could swim over to the mangroves and play and be able to
get back on the boat, if no-one was on board. This was also a heck of a lot easier than hauling 2 very wet 80 lb. dogs back on board. Living aboard a boat is much more social than one would think and there were many pot-luck dinner gatherings and as donefarming mentioned, other boaters can become like family and great friends. It's not unusual to make lifelong friends. I have many still from those days and many who still live that lifestyle and always visit when passing thru the VI now that I live on land.
It's just what "floats your boat" as the saying goes.


ReplyQuote
janeinstx
(@janeinstx)
Trusted Member
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 666
May 2, 2014 12:31 pm  

In the words of Gary, "how do you feel about dying?"

Yep, that's exactly what he asked me!

Actually, come to think of it, I think what he said was, "Are you afraid to die?".

@doc, Don't let the above bother you. It's not THAT dangerous.:)

I've seldom laughed as hard as the night he told that story


ReplyQuote
Settlers Handbook

Thinking about moving to the Virgin Islands?

The Settler's Handbook is a Indispensable Guide

The current 19th Edition, will help you explore your dream of island living. A solid reference book, it was first published in 1975. That's 40+ years of helping people move to the Virgin Islands.

Order Today $19.95
Close Menu