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MED MJ, Decriminalization and Industrial Hemp  

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Alana33
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August 3, 2012 11:33 pm  

If you can't support MJ and hemp then don't.

My only reluctance to add my name to a list of proponents is that I'm not sure I have enough faith in the VI Government to implement such a policy and follow through on all the safeguards necessary to both license and protect licensed growers of medical marijuana. Most of the states which passed such legislation had substantial growing pains and our government has thus far proved over and over again that it's "growing pains" in most areas are proportionately enormous.

I couldn't agree more,OT. Personally, I am not for this legislation at all. There are other issues that need to be addressed before any legalization should be instituted. I know that medical MJ is helpful with certain illnesses especially side effects of chemo.
However, there is, in my mind, too much potential for abuse of this legislation, at this particular time in VI history.
We need to clean house before we open the house. The risks outweigh the rewards.

Altho if everyone was growing there own personal patch for their own personal use, it would put the MJ smugglers and dealers right out of business. Then you'd have to worry about someone not only breaking into your house but the yard as well!


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blu4u
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August 3, 2012 11:38 pm  

Altho if everyone was growing there own personal patch for their own personal use, it would put the MJ smugglers and dealers right out of business. Then you'd have to worry about someone not only breaking into your house but the yard as well!

Someone? My nieghbor tells an assumsing story about rats.....


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CajunlostinCali
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August 3, 2012 11:40 pm  

Then there is hemp. The seeds are a super food and sell for $10/lb. The oil is also valuble, so is the plant fiber. It grows in poor soil with little water just about anywhere.

Hemp is a crop that can pass all day long provided it is not being lumped with Medicinal Marijuana. Hemp can be grown as a plant without the properties that are governed in Marijuana. Hemp is a crop that has a laundry list of manufactured use, textiles included. That right there are two industries that would create some well needed jobs for an area begging for ideas. Hemp clothes...check em out; http://www.soul-flower.com/organic/menshemp/?gclid=CJbbrpDMzLECFQdrhwodNTcAAw

Get some hip clothing line with an island lifestyle market push with "Made in the USVI" on the tag and folks are gonna buy. Boutiques, outlets... All from the farm it was born.

In America, Medical Marijuana will always be a fight. If we can stop being Americans for a day and just look at the templates from other countries that are legally developed, you will find that not many have returned to the thinking that it should be banned. Take the enforcement proceeds saved and divert those funds to fighting crap like Meth and opiate abuse, we might just get ahead in this war on drugs.

.02


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blu4u
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August 3, 2012 11:43 pm  

Take the enforcement proceeds saved and divert those funds to fighting crap like Meth and opiate abuse, we might just get ahead in this war on drugs.

.02

Fighting opiate abuse entails taking on the big drug companies and the MDs who profit.


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Alana33
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August 3, 2012 11:44 pm  

Altho if everyone was growing there own personal patch for their own personal use, it would put the MJ smugglers and dealers right out of business. Then you'd have to worry about someone not only breaking into your house but the yard as well!

Someone? My nieghbor tells an assumsing story about rats.....

Stoned rats with the munchies..............oh! oh! look out!

Just had a couple good gusts and a little rain.


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CajunlostinCali
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August 3, 2012 11:54 pm  

Fighting opiate abuse entails taking on the big drug companies and the MDs who profit.

Pick your poison.

But you get the idea, right?


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Bombi
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August 4, 2012 12:57 am  

Yes MMJ, decrim and hemp are all separate issues. hemp is kind of a no brainer, it could work here, perhaps benefit the livestock farmer as well. There just happens to be 3 proposed pieces of legislation on the table. MMJ is probably the most important in my view. Why because it works. I deal with multiple sclerosis of which symptoms are muscle spasms and tremors. I could take a pharma drug, balcofen that does help but the side effects are just not worth it to me as I work full time and have a small business and can't give in tto he drug induced fatigue .
I did a drug called copaxone for over 10 years that was supposed to limit relapses and progression at a cost of about $3600 per month. The clinical trails stated that the drug was 30% effective for 39 % of the participants and the placebo was 27 % effective. I kept having relapses and the disease progressed causing disability. I began using the drug every other day instead of every day injections, I felt better, I stopped the drug and felt good. I relied on supplements, diet ,exercise and MJ for symptom relief for a year and to be sure that I wasn't making a huge mistake got an MRI. The results were, no active disease. A fluke, not so far. I used o take 5_6 prescription drugs a day, including pain killers, now rarely a vicodin. Certain strains of MJ work better than others and it is possible to roughly control the intake of CBD vs THC.
I find all these generalizations humorous. If you take the time to understand the science, you would understand. I am still working, walking and mobile at 62 years old after 20+years of MS. Every case of MS is very different so I understand that my choices may not work for everyone. Just keep an open mind. raising the age of consent is being discussed and IMO would be a good idea.

Marty, what ever happened to USVINORMAL, after Linda did her head trip?


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Bombi
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blu4u
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August 4, 2012 1:21 am  

Bombi, Thanks for sharing obivously very personal and difficult info. Given the choice, MedMJ or synthetic opiate, I'd take MJ everyday of the week..... Tracking your progress with regularly scheduled tests is also important. Do you chart your dose and results along with other factors, diet, stress, etc? Take care.


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Marty on STT
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August 4, 2012 1:35 pm  

@Bombi: Yes, Linda is still plugging away...we had a nice exchange of e-mails last night, prompted from this very thread...she sent several emails to different Senators yesterday and I believe I will be posting an update to USVI NORML's stance on this page in the very near future...

Please read the following 'Letter to the Editor' of the VI Daily News, which was printed in the November 25, 2009 edition, as a 2 page spread, written by Linda Adler (it's figure's are not up to date, but the letter makes for a very strong argument for USVI NORNL's stance on this subject...even 3 years later):

Open Letter to the Residents of the United States Virgin Islands

Dear Fellow Residents,

I came to St. Croix for the first time in 1987. Oh, what I fell in love with - the people, the land, the sea - the mountains - it was all so magical! When my best friend died suddenly almost 20 years later, I re-evaluated my life - and this is where I came - back to St. Croix. This is where my heart is - my friends and my adopted families are here. I brought up my children as older teens here.

But as much as St. Croix (and the rest of the Territory) offers in beauty and appeal to its visitors and residents, if we don't look to the future and make serious changes, we will lose these islands we call home. We will lose our young people to the allure of a better future somewhere else. We are losing them now because there is no value to life in some of their minds. We need to step up to the plate - and fast - to put a halt to the violence and killings, to build a future for all the people of the US Virgin Islands, and to free up the resources that could be better directed if we were to make some changes within our laws.

Let me begin with letting everyone know, I am not a smoker of cannabis. I tried it early in my 20's, but it didn't appeal to me. I have used cannabis to treat medical conditions (Fibromyalgia, severe gastric problems, and wounds/cuts) and I have cooked with cannabis on occasion(meals, not just cookies). I have seen the healing power it has to treat medical conditions first hand (myself and my son) and with others. I have experienced and understand the use of cannabis as a tool, a gift for meditation and spirituality. I also understand and have known many people who use it to unwind as many use alcohol without any of the negative effects of the alcohol. Strong words, I know, as we live in Rum Country!

Earlier this year I began working with some like-minded residents of the Territory and we became an official chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. We are officially USVI NORML. Our mission is to educate and lobby to reform laws regarding cannabis. We have many reasons to look to changing the laws regarding cannabis within the Territory. If you will indulge me, I shall explain our views.

Cannabis has been proven to relieve a number of medical conditions - and despite the US Government mandating that Cannabis remain on the Schedule 1 class of drugs - with no medicinal benefit - the US Government itself holds a patent on the cannabinoids that are found
in this plant. This patent # 6630507 states that certain properties (cannabinoids) that are from this plant have medicinal benefit. Quoting from the Abstract of the patent:
"Cannabinoids have been found to have antioxidant properties, unrelated to NMDA receptor antagonism. This new found property makes cannabinoids useful in the treatment and prophylaxis of wide variety of oxidation associated diseases, such as ischemic, age-related, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The cannabinoids are found to have particular application as neuroprotectants, for example in limiting neurological damage following ischemic insults, such as stroke and trauma, or in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and HIV dementia."

Yet we are told by the same United States Government that filed for and holds this patent that there is no medicinal value to this plant and that is why it remains on the Schedule 1 drug list. We believe that all people should have the access to this plant - this herb that grows freely in the ground such as chamomile, or lemon grass - without the stigma and legal ramifications that are currently attached to this plant. It is an herb - just as many others that we use daily - others that give us certain curative value.

We have a culture here (and I don't mean habit - but culture) of the use of herb for religious sacrament as well as being lifted to a higher place of enlightenment. Why should those people suffer in their worship? We spend untold dollars (dollars that could benefit us) seeking out, arresting, prosecuting, and housing people for growing and selling a plant. People die because when this is held in the dark - kept illegal - there is the element of violence and crime that comes from illegal activity. It is part and parcel to prohibition. Look back to the years of alcohol's prohibition to see the violence and crime that came of it. It has been told to me that it costs approximately $35,000 per year to house a prisoner of a cannabis crime at Golden Grove. And that person’s life is harmed in so many ways. They cannot decide to change their life and get a student loan to further their education. They cannot enter the military to serve our country. They cannot get a HUD or other government loan to build a home and their future. The cost of prohibition to society, especially here in the USVI, hurts us severely in numerous ways. I applaud the Governor for trying to ensure a future industry and income to the Territorial Government with the recent rum deals that have been negotiated. But we are putting out a lot for the promises (albeit in contractual form) of a strong return to come in the future. An additional alternative exists.

And let's not forget that 13 States (totally over 700,000 Registered Medical Marijuana patients – not including California which does not require registration) have legalized some level of medical marijuana. Eleven more states have legislation pending with more changes coming daily. When those eleven states legalize medical marijuana HALF OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA will have legalized medical marijuana. And the Unites States Department of Justice has recently announced policy for Federal Prosecutors to not pursue prosecution of Medical Marijuana patients that comply with their State Laws.

Currently only 3 states offer any reciprocation for registered patients - meaning if you have a medical MJ card you can only visit 3 states and use your medicine legally. Those states are Montana, Michigan, and Rhode Island - with another either having just - or about to include reciprocity. If we fail to recognize and move ahead of the happenings in the mainland, we are telling potentially half of the USA we don't support your choice of medicine - so don't come here on vacation if you use medical marijuana. We don't want your kind here. So, how much revenue and tourism numbers are we looking at potentially deflecting AWAY from the Territory? So here are our thoughts: We legalize (or totally decriminalize if that suits you better) cannabis for Industrial and Personal use by responsible adults.

We aren't encouraging people to use who don't - we are taking those that currently do and bringing them into a safe place - away from the elements that exist in prohibition - in illegal realms. They don't have to put themselves in harm’s way in order to medicate - or meditate - or worship. These are adults that are already medicating, meditating, and worshiping. Let's give them the freedom to use this PLANT as it is intended without fear. Now, we allow for those adults who so wish to use, possess, and grow cannabis for their own personal use. If they chose not to grow their own, we allow them to purchase it from a licensed vendor who may also be a licensed grower or who has purchased it wholesale from a licensed grower. So now we have just brought those illegal, underground entrepreneurs to the legitimate side of business. They now are licensed business owners. There are some trade offs for them - but the benefits truly outweigh the perceived negatives. Now we look at the industrial hemp industry. Industrial hemp is very low THC content cannabis - it won't get you high. It is grown and used for its extreme strength, durability, and "green" factors. If we were to legalize the cultivation, processing, and export of raw, processed, or finished hemp products - just think how our agricultural industry would flourish! We could be re-living the times when Sugar was King! Farmers worldwide have harvested the crop for the past 12,000 years for fiber and food. More than 30 industrialized nations commercially grow hemp, including England and Canada.

Now take that agricultural market for cannabis hemp products and, aside from the revitalization for our farmers, see how this can build our future economy and our young people. We have such talent on these islands in our youth. From spoken word, to the written, from the visual to the physical art works - we have more creative people here than we know. We need to encourage these people to develop hemp clothing lines, paper products, the creams, ointments, shampoos, perfumes, and other products that are being produced from this plant - to design what they will with their unending creativity. Many high end automotive companies are building cars (body panels to interior coverings and interiors to the door panels) out of hemp and its byproducts. They are developing and producing bio fuels out of this plant. It is being used in building materials. And it has the ability to help save our planet from the abuse we have inflicted with our misuse of her resources.
Examples of products made from hemp include clothing, building materials, and automotive interior and exterior parts. Lotus made a concept car in 2008 called the Lotus Eco Elise. The renewable materials that have been incorporated into the Eco Elise project include hemp (industrial cannabis) that’s used on the car’s composite body panels, spoiler and seats, eco wool for the upholstery and sisal for the carpet. Here is a picture of what Cannabis Hemp has been processed into: Lotus Eco Elise Auto Parts Building Materials / Insulation Instrument Textiles

Perhaps now we could retain our youth - rather than having them leave the Territory for school never to return - we could build educational programs focusing more on business, creating of products, manufacturing and process engineering, and of course agriculture - all giving them the opportunity for not just jobs - but careers - here in the US Virgin Islands - their home. In order to support these new businesses and the increased agriculture, there will have to be supporting businesses as well.

And we haven't even touched on tourism. We know there are nearly a million medical marijuana patients legally using marijuana as medicine on a daily basis in the United States. There are also over 15 countries, besides the United States, that have some form of either medical marijuana or decriminalization laws. Our own Department of Tourism tells us we have over 2 million visitors to the Territory every year. We can either increase or decrease that number by the laws that we put into place. If we choose to continue as we are, criminalizing cannabis, we will surely decrease our tourism as the number of states and countries around us continue to push toward legalizing at some level. If we choose to create our own future, we could be looking at a future of season-less tourism. We could be looking at additional businesses to support the desire and demand by our tourists for cannabis-based businesses such as cafes, herbal markets, cannabis friendly restaurants and hotels (segregated or exclusive) with resulting supportive businesses. We are not talking about allowing people to walk down the street smoking cannabis. We are suggesting responsible use in restricted public places and in private. We advocate respecting the rights of all people - those choosing to refrain and those choosing to partake. This has the potential of increasing the volume of business to all existing businesses, restaurants, stores, hotels, businesses of all types as tourism continues year round and increases in numbers. This will also bring additional businesses and supportive business opportunities to the residents of the Territory. We advocate for the ownership of any cannabis-based business and the supporting businesses to be majority owned by resident Virgin Islanders and any cannabis used to manufacture or that is sold in any form come directly from the agricultural sector here in the Territory. We want to build the future of the Territory with the people and resources of the Territory.

To briefly summarize for a moment, we have saved financial and human resources by redirecting the efforts of law enforcement to bring the Territory to a safe place by focusing on violent crimes. We have brought back to life the agricultural industry that once made these islands great. We have found a way to retain our youth - and give them hope for a future and a way to express their creative nature using this plant. We have created new businesses and supporting businesses based on this plant. We have found a way to level out our employment throughout the year, reducing unemployment, slow business periods, possibly welfare recipients, and increase the self worth of our people. We will be bringing additional revenues to the existing businesses by increased tourism throughout the year. We place the US Virgin Islands on the leading edge of what is about to happen on a world wide scale. In all of this we haven't even touched on the revenues that the Government could recognize without offering ANY ADDITIONAL INCENTIVES - aside from those that are available currently to businesses.

Based on the Tourism Department's own numbers, if only 4% of the 2 million tourists were to purchase a Visitor Use Permit for a specified time frame - say up to 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year as we have tourist and part time residents as well - a figure close to $12 million could be easily generated in a 12 month period from the visitor use permits alone. Add to that the increased business and employment taxes paid by new and existing businesses, the reduction in unemployment and welfare benefits paid, and the licensing/registration fees for resident users, growers, and business vendors. There are many, many valid reasons for us to re-evaluate our stance on legalizing this herb right now. If we don't act now, we will find ourselves in a position of lost revenue and tourism. We will continue to lose our children to the effects of criminalizing this plant - forcing people to hover in places they shouldn't be, forcing our youth to see lives (perhaps theirs) cut short because someone sees no future - no value in living - no real fear or consequence in taking life. We must act now. We have legislation written that includes everything I have shared with you and more. Everyone will benefit from this legislation - but we must stand up. As Bob Marley said, "Get up. Stand up. Stand up for your rights!"

We have the right to change the laws. We have the right to build and create a future for our people of the US Virgin Islands. We have the right to a better life. And we have the right - granted to us by the Revised Organic Act of 1954 and our own laws - to have the Commissioner of Health reclassify cannabis on the Territorial Schedule of Drugs - or remove it entirely! We only have these small islands to ourselves for a short time. Let's not ruin the time we have by refusing to step up to the plate for our children and their future - the future of The US Virgin Islands.


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Alana33
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August 4, 2012 1:51 pm  

Hey Bombi - here's a link to an article I came across this morning that may interest you, in particular.

http://www.care2.com/causes/challenge-to-marijuana-classification-pending-in-courts.html


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Bombi
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August 4, 2012 2:30 pm  

Thanks Alana, Yes it has been a long battle and the basic premise is the DEA has been ignoring over 20,00 clinical, medical and scientific studies about the efficacy of cannabis and keeping their heads in the sand. Rescheduling will be the ultimate win. I am involved with ASA as an ambassador and regularly support their advocacy. Rescheduling will also allow cannabis to be more widely researched in the US as ow a special permit is required. It will be interesting


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BeachcomberStt
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August 4, 2012 7:20 pm  

"I also understand and have known many people who use it to unwind as many use alcohol without any of the negative effects of the alcohol. Strong words, I know, as we live in Rum Country!"

So, as a member of NORML USVI, one is against using alcohol as a way to unwind and only use MJ to do so. Is that correct?

Because of the many negative side affects of alcohol use, one should only use MJ and do NOT ingest any form of alcohol at all for medicial, spiritual, recreational, cultural, etc. use. Correct?

If you use alcohol and MJ, I see that as contradiction. It is one or another when arguing for decriminalization of MJ. Correct?
Especially if arguing because of a medical condition.

You can't have it both ways, as I see it!


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Linda J
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August 5, 2012 1:00 am  

I'm taking no stand on this issue, but I want to make sure everyone knows that I am NOT the Linda mentioned.


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stxchick2012
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August 5, 2012 3:49 am  

Hey Linda J -
Nope it's not you - it's me.

Personally, marijuana is safer than alcohol. That has been proven. USVI NORML does not advocate for alcohol use or dis-use. We advocate for the legalization of marijuana - which has been shown to have not only medicinal uses as Bombi speaks to - but it's uses include spirituality, relaxation, enlightenment. It doesn't matter which use - this plant grows free. It should not be regulated - let alone classified as it is. Especially when the Health & Human Services of the USA has been assigned a patent (years ago) that speaks directly to the conditions that cannabinoids are beneficial for. Such hipocrisy! (and there will be hearings to consider the rescheduling of marijuana in the very near future)

Marty posted the letter to the editor which I wrote in 2009. What are the disputes that can be made against what was written then? Are we not losing our children/youth to violent crimes - many originating with the criminalization of this plant? Are we not spending untold dollars (which the VI PD and the DOJ can't and don't quantify) on LEO, the Drug Task Force and the court system to find and prosecute, and house people over a literal weed?

Are we not in financial straits worse than we were in 2009? Can you not see business entities arise from legalizing this flowering herb? Do you not want year round tourism? Do you not want monies that can replace what the government blows on a regular basis? We could work to fund GERS - fix our education system and re-employ teachers. We could place many unemployed workers. We can educate them in horticulture through UVI's horticulture and aquapoinics programs. We can utilize the SBA to educate people on the tools available and how to start/run a business. We can have a future for our youth. We can experience year-round tourism!

We can manufacture products from both cannabis and hemp - sell them here - and export them. Testing of any product to be grown and sold commerically will be mandated to scientific testing as to thc/cbd ratios and to ensure it's purity. The sale of marijuana itself will be regulated to licensed commercial entities (including commercial growers) which will have specific guidelines to which they must adhere.

Hours have been spent reaching out to the dealers - on the streets - getting them to see the benefits of legalizing this plant. They can come together as a co-op/business and they would recognize even more income and the benefits of being a law abiding citizen - just as any other citizens who choose to build a business in this field. Businesses would be required that a majority ownership are Virgin Island residents as growing our own futures should begin with us..

The people we would be bringing to the VI as tourists are not what many consider "stoners" and bums that would hang at the beaches - littering our shores with the unwanted element. A majority of marijuana users are employed, educated people who have realized the benefits of this plant. They are the ones who could AFFORD to come here. It costs between $400 - $800 for a round trip ticket. What stoners do you know that would be able to afford that?

Tell me please what is different now than then? What isn't relevant that legalizing offers?

Medical is good. Basic decrim good. But I've seen the decrim bill that was being drafted last year. It isn't a real decrim bill - not really.

Please - I am open to real criticism to what I have posted. What will you refute?

Why has it taken 3 years to revisit this subject with our legislators? The Senators that are speaking in Sen. Nelson's favor now are the exact same ones that supported it in 2009-2010.

Over half of the United States have enacted some form of legislation of this plant. What makes us any different? We stand to lose as the rest of the States benefit. And we have much to lose.


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OldTart
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August 5, 2012 10:47 am  

Decriminalizing the use of marijuana is one thing. Creating a cottage industry of growing it commercially is something completely different. Let's slowly deal with one thing at a time and exercise extreme caution and sensibility where the "Grand Plan" is concerned.


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Bombi
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August 5, 2012 11:37 am  

Agree OT, the topic is the proposed legislation/referendum that could amend use and possession penalties and acknowledge and ligitimize use of cannabis for medical purposes.
This should be a decision that is well thought out and made by the residents and voters of our islands.

Any and all law considered must comply with Federal law.


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Linda J
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August 5, 2012 12:58 pm  

Hi sweetie! How are you? Do you know we are back in Kentucky? Family issues. Ric wasn't happy about the move, but I really missed the family. Hope you and the kids (?) are all good.


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stxchick2012
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August 5, 2012 3:07 pm  

Agree OT, the topic is the proposed legislation/referendum that could amend use and possession penalties and acknowledge and ligitimize use of cannabis for medical purposes.
This should be a decision that is well thought out and made by the residents and voters of our islands.

Any and all law considered must comply with Federal law.

I am confused about your conflicting statements. How does medical marijuana comply with Federal law currently?

How is a referendum put to the people asking if the Legislature should act on this subject = a decision well thought out and made by the residents and voters of our islands? That is just putting it in the hands of our Legislators who have not listened to or looked out for the best interests of the people so far.

And within the ROA and the VI Code there are methods that we can use to legalize this plant. There are provisions in the VI Code that haven't even been looked at or are known. How many people have researched and found these?


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OldTart
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August 5, 2012 3:48 pm  

I am confused about your conflicting statements. How does medical marijuana comply with Federal law currently? /quote]

It doesn't. But everything is slowly evolving:

http://www.care2.com/causes/challenge-to-marijuana-classification-pending-in-courts.html

Nothing's going to change any time soon and, as the subject relates to the USVI, I'm more than happy that it won't for the same reasons I've opined before. All in good time.


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stxchick2012
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August 5, 2012 4:35 pm  

I am glad to see progress both in the states and within the Territory. What is the tipping point for national change? How many states will it take for the Feds to change their stance? Just curious...

And please understand, it isn't about who pushes the cannabis/hemp issue forward - it is that what gets passed is in the best interst of the people and the Territory.

bless


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sheiba
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August 5, 2012 5:10 pm  

I have no interest in smoking pot personally but......I believe alcohol is just as bad or worse then pot smoking. If alcohol is legal maybe pot should be as well.
Just my opinion.


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Marty on STT
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August 6, 2012 12:33 am  

There is SO much more to cannabis than 'smoking pot'...this is what I mean by education...we need to bring to light the many benefits, not just to us here in the VI, but to the entire planet...here's an aritcle that just scratches the surface: Cannabis


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Matt T
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August 6, 2012 2:29 pm  

I hate to be the bearer of bad news here, but a much as I support all the referandums mentioned- they wil never happen here.

Think about why MJ is illegal in the first place. It is easily grown and therefore cannot be readily taxed by the government. This is really just a minor point though.

The main point is we have a generally complacent and dare I say naieve local population here. I have been told that MJ allows one to "see" things outside the box and develop ideas and viewpoints that are countercurrent to what big brother wants.

Alcohol and cigarettes are legal because of what they do to the human body and mind. Alcohol makes you dumb and slow. Essentially, it keeps the rats in their cages (they just get a little fiesteier). Alchol and cigarettes are a boon to the healthcare industry with all the adverse health effects they cause. Lets face it, the healthcare industry and pharmacuetical companies rake in giant profits and they have a lot of control over the govenrment.

In short, the US governgment does not want healthy citizens, who live long lives, do not need healthcare, and think outside the box. The VI governmnet certainly doesn't want this and as long as they rely on handouts from the states- will not do anything that would jeopardize these handouts.

I am not able to enjoy the many benefits of this plant due to job restrictions, however I fully support the legalization of MJ, Industrial hemp, and MJ tourism. It really is a no brainer and could be the saviour to these islands. But I also live in reality and if they can't fix potholes, crime and education here, I don't have much hope for the healing of the nation as some people call it.


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Marty on STT
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Posts: 1780
August 6, 2012 3:05 pm  

@Matt: The US government doesn't make our laws here, we do...so, whatever their 'agenda' may be, it has nothing to do with us...the Bills are already going before the Legislature..it's now up to us to vote them in...negativity like yours helps to keep us back...many people may not go out and vote because of the 'what good would it do, anyway?' attitude...GET OUT AND VOTE!!


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