Moving with a dog  

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marshc
(@marshc)
Active Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 15
October 5, 2016 4:12 am  

Hey guys, my fiancée and I will be moving down in December. I have yet to find a definitive answer as to my questions about our fur baby. My veterinarian said something about having to get a health certificate from the federal veterinarian which is in the state capitol, Oklahoma City. Is this true? I figured I could get a health certificate from any accredited veterinarian.

Thanks in advance,
Colin


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haymad
(@haymad)
Active Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 14
October 17, 2016 1:42 pm  

All ESA dogs fly in the cabin with you for FREE no matter what breed. No breed restrictions.

Is this for all airlines? Or should I do more research behind Delta's ESA policy?

All airlines that operate under US law. There are supposed to be size restrictions if the dog is not ESA or a service dog. If they are ESA or service dog then as long as they sit at your feet and dont interfere with other passengers then they are fine. My wife and I had 2 seats together so my 105 lb little guy had plenty of room. As he grows we will have to buy all 3 seats in the row so that he has plenty of room. Remember, your dog must be trained to act very calmly and properly for the whole trip in the airport and on the plane and must not be a problem for any other staff or passengers. Mine just sleeps. 🙂 Good luck!


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Gator's Mom
(@Gator's_Mom)
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Posts: 967

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stxsailor
(@stxsailor)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 588
October 18, 2016 7:31 pm  

Unless your dog is actually an emotional support animal please do not just get a Dr. to sign the animal off as an ESA. I understand the desire to circumvent the fees but as airlines figure out (they are) that some people are falsely having an animal signed off the airlines are going to make it tighter and those that really need it will suffer. There have been instances where "emotional support animals" have bitten passengers. So if you really need it by all means but don't falsify to save a few bucks.


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tedc
 tedc
(@tedc)
Advanced Member
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 71
October 18, 2016 7:58 pm  

ESA alpacas, turtles, and pigs...
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/10/20/pets-allowed


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Trixie_b
(@Trixie_b)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 37
October 18, 2016 8:29 pm  

Unless your dog is actually an emotional support animal please do not just get a Dr. to sign the animal off as an ESA. I understand the desire to circumvent the fees but as airlines figure out (they are) that some people are falsely having an animal signed off the airlines are going to make it tighter and those that really need it will suffer. There have been instances where "emotional support animals" have bitten passengers. So if you really need it by all means but don't falsify to save a few bucks.

Thank you for your measured response on this.... I was trying to say the same but yours was far more polite than I was going to be. I love my dog, and I will worry about his journey from California to the islands next month, but he will go in the hold, and I would never dream of calling him a support dog just because I could.


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marshc
(@marshc)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 15
October 18, 2016 11:23 pm  

I, by no means, meant to offend anyone! My fiancée does have a condition, and we were thinking about registering our Australian shepherd. I just figured this would be the perfect time to do it.


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Trixie_b
(@Trixie_b)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 37
October 19, 2016 12:59 am  

I, by no means, meant to offend anyone! My fiancée does have a condition, and we were thinking about registering our Australian shepherd. I just figured this would be the perfect time to do it.

STXSailor was very diplomatic in his response.... I'm sure you understand why it's important to ask people not to abuse the system. I'm sorry about your partners condition and perhaps now is the time for you to register your dog if he/she provides a service to your partner..


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watruw8ing4
(@watruw8ing4)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 850
October 20, 2016 2:08 pm  

Just food for thought.

Why would you spring an unnecessary $80 to $200 when all you need is a letter or form from a current professional, which you are required to have for an ESA anyway? It carries no additional clout, and the "certification" is not officially recognized by anyone except the people who are taking your money. I know several people who fly regularly (some actually legit) with no registration cards, vests, tags or leashes and have no issues. I really don't get it.


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marshc
(@marshc)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 15
October 20, 2016 2:40 pm  

Just food for thought.

Why would you spring an unnecessary $80 to $200 when all you need is a letter or form from a current professional, which you are required to have for an ESA anyway? It carries no additional clout, and the "certification" is not officially recognized by anyone except the people who are taking your money. I know several people who fly regularly (some actually legit) with no registration cards, vests, tags or leashes and have no issues. I really don't get it.

So, in summary, what you're saying is my fiancée should just get a note from our doctor, and that will suffice? That would be much easier and cheaper on us.


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watruw8ing4
(@watruw8ing4)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 850
October 23, 2016 1:26 pm  

Just food for thought.

Why would you spring an unnecessary $80 to $200 when all you need is a letter or form from a current professional, which you are required to have for an ESA anyway? It carries no additional clout, and the "certification" is not officially recognized by anyone except the people who are taking your money. I know several people who fly regularly (some actually legit) with no registration cards, vests, tags or leashes and have no issues. I really don't get it.

So, in summary, what you're saying is my fiancée should just get a note from our doctor, and that will suffice? That would be much easier and cheaper on us.

Yep. Just check with the airline you are using. Their specific documentation requirements for flying with ESA are usually posted online.. I think American now has its own form for the practitioner to sign, and requires(requests?) 48 hours notice before the flight. I don't know anyone who has flown with those "registrations". I know one who uses a service vest that she purchased online for $8, as she gets fewer queries from airline workers (flight attendants, etc) to show the doc when they see her un-crated dog, after she gets past the gate agent.


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stxsailor
(@stxsailor)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 588
October 24, 2016 12:46 pm  

So this person that bought an $8 service vest is abusing the system and will make it harder for people who legitimately need an ESA or service animal.


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watruw8ing4
(@watruw8ing4)
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Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 850
October 24, 2016 2:10 pm  

So this person that bought an $8 service vest is abusing the system and will make it harder for people who legitimately need an ESA or service animal.

No, this particular person has a legitimate mental illness diagnosis and receives regular care. I have, unfortunately, witnessed a few episodes that she's had. The vest was so that she did not have to repeatedly show her documentation or be asked if the dog was legit, once she'd gotten approved at the gate.

I understand your skepticism and share it. I have seen too many instances people who are gaming the system. Some people have unabashedly told me, or indicated on Facebook they did, and have encouraged myself and others to do it. It's going to eventually make those who need it have to jump through more hoops. And it's going to make it harder for those who pay to get on the plane.


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AandA2VI
(@AandA2VI)
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Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 2289
October 25, 2016 11:34 pm  

FWIW. Some of you are not understanding what a ESA truly is. This is NOT a working animal. They require no training, or offer any "assistance" other than physically being there for their handlers.

ESA's are not required to have ANY documentation other than your RX from your health physician that lasts one year at a time. You do not need any certificates, badges, vests or anything at all. The flight attendant is not even allowed to ask you to show your RX. That is all imputed to the computer when you book your flight. You DO have to reach out to the airlines as some require 10 days advance notice - AA is such airlines.

*** The views and opinions expressed in my posts are soley those of A&A2VI and other like minded islanders. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the majority or any/all contributors to this site. Have a GREAT DAY!


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East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 5307
October 26, 2016 10:27 am  

So, what you're saying is that ESA IS a scam...


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Alana33
(@Alana33)
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Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 12144
October 26, 2016 12:25 pm  

If airlines didn't make it so difficult to travel with your pets, less people would be trying to scam the system. Not saying it's right to do so.


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stxsailor
(@stxsailor)
Trusted Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 588
October 26, 2016 12:49 pm  

From the airlines web page

May or may not be trained to perform observable functions. However, the animal must be trained to behave properly in public settings as service animals do. Emotional support animals travel free of charge and the animal is exempt from cabin allotment. Like service animals, emotional support animals can be transported in the cabin.
Delta requires documentation* (not more than one year old) on letterhead from either a licensed medical or mental health professional to be presented to an agent upon check in stating:
Title, address, license number and jurisdiction (state/country it was issued), phone number, and signature of mental health professional.
The passenger has a mental health related disability recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual - 4th Edition.
That the passenger needs the emotional support or psychiatric service animal as an accommodation for air travel and/or for activity at the passenger's destination.
That the person listed in the letter is under the care of the assessing physician or mental health professional.
*Passengers may use a signed or stamped digital letter on their mobile device as long as the information can be verified (i.e. phone numbers, email addresses etc.)
A kennel is not required for emotional support animals if they are fully trained and meet same requirements as a service animal. Passengers should ask to speak to the Complaint Resolution Office (CRO) if they encounter any issues while traveling with emotional support animals.
Note: Passengers intending to travel with emotional support animals into England need to arrange PRE-APRROVAL CLEARANCE and pay a fee for processing. For London-Heathrow (LHR) you must contact Customs Animal Reception Centre on +44 208 745 7895, or +44 208 759 7002. For London-Gatwick (LGW) the Customs Animal Reception Centre contact number is +44 1293 555580. For Manchester (MAN) processing is handled by Pets on Jets and the contact number is +44 161 209 7670.


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ritani5522
(@ritani5522)
Active Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 10
November 22, 2016 9:10 pm  

Be careful, some airlines and landlords will not accept ESA letters from online registries (because so many people do abuse the system) so make sure you get a note from an actual doctor that treats you. The note is the ONLY thing you need, however, my ESA always wears his vest. It prevents nosy people from bugging me 🙂


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