Your password will need to be updated. Use the “forgot password” feature to create a new password.

Join discussions on moving to and living in the USVI, ask questions, share info & tips!
(Vacationing? Visit Travel Message Board)

Net metering  

Page 1 / 4 Next
  RSS
LoveUSVI
(@LoveUSVI)
Eminent Member

WAPA has stopped future net metering contracts in STT and STJ

http://stthomassource.com/content/2017/06/28/wapa-closes-net-metering-applications-on-st-thomas-st-john/

Reactions?

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 5:29 pm
Gator's Mom
(@Gator's_Mom)
Prominent Member

From the beginning, WAPA said there were a limited number of net metering permits available. It's about managing the electric load sources on the grid.

WAPA has stopped future net metering contracts in STT and STJ

http://stthomassource.com/content/2017/06/28/wapa-closes-net-metering-applications-on-st-thomas-st-john/

Reactions?

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 5:50 pm
Exit Zero
(@Exit_Zero)
Noble Member

So can you install solar panels, reduce your wapa usage and cost - just not get paid by WAPA for any extra you generate?

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 5:58 pm
Gator's Mom
(@Gator's_Mom)
Prominent Member

No. The electric grid can only accommodate a certain amount of solar generated power.

So can you install solar panels, reduce your wapa usage and cost - just not get paid by WAPA for any extra you generate?

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 6:29 pm
fdr
 fdr
(@fdr)
Noble Member

The only way to set up solar energy now, if you do not already have a net metering permit, is to set up a standalone battery system. WAPA has no say-so in anything that is not connected to its grid.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 7:11 pm
SunnyCaribe
(@SunnyCaribe)
Reputable Member

I've never understood the attraction of net-metering.

Presumably it's WAPA's high cost and poor mamagement and reliability that would drive you to invest in an alternative energy system.

So...why would you then invest in a system that obligated you to enter into another contractual agreement with WAPA, an agreement to which they alone set the terms, and which they may revoke at any time?

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 7:52 pm
fdr
 fdr
(@fdr)
Noble Member

I've never understood the attraction of net-metering.

Presumably it's WAPA's high cost and poor mamagement and reliability that would drive you to invest in an alternative energy system.

So...why would you then invest in a system that obligated you to enter into another contractual agreement with WAPA, an agreement to which they alone set the terms, and which they may revoke at any time?

Yeah, it's not fun to still be dependent on WAPA. The folks who do net metering find the cost savings so significantly substantial as to make the investment still worthwhile. Plus there's a 30% federal tax credit for renewable energy, which makes the upfront cost much cheaper and payoff of the investment faster.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 8:05 pm
SunnyCaribe
(@SunnyCaribe)
Reputable Member

I've never understood the attraction of net-metering.

Presumably it's WAPA's high cost and poor mamagement and reliability that would drive you to invest in an alternative energy system.

So...why would you then invest in a system that obligated you to enter into another contractual agreement with WAPA, an agreement to which they alone set the terms, and which they may revoke at any time?

Yeah, it's not fun to still be dependent on WAPA. The folks who do net metering find the cost savings so significantly substantial as to make the investment still worthwhile. Plus there's a 30% federal tax credit for renewable energy, which makes the upfront cost much cheaper and payoff of the investment faster.

I enjoyed the same tax credit when I installed my pv/battery system, and the only reason I know when WAPA goes out is when my neighbor, with his yard full of net-metered panels, fires up his generator. SMDH.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 8:20 pm
fdr
 fdr
(@fdr)
Noble Member

Agreed, Sunny. The grid-tied systems were more affordable, though - not everyone has the budget for complete energy independence.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 8:25 pm
Scubadoo
(@Scubadoo)
Noble Member

Batteries are expensive and take up space. With net metering you can bank your extra power during the day and use Wapa at night and maybe still end up in the black. Hence the reason for limited permits. Wapa can't store power effectively either so they have to be able to provide for variable power generation day and night.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 9:24 pm
Beeski
(@Beeski)
Island Expert

ROI for net metering was under 3 years when I did it 4 years ago.
As battery technology improves / gets cheaper, I am hoping to be able to move off the grid in 5-10 years.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 8, 2017 9:24 am
SunnyCaribe
(@SunnyCaribe)
Reputable Member

Batteries are expensive and take up space. With net metering you can bank your extra power during the day and use Wapa at night and maybe still end up in the black. Hence the reason for limited permits. Wapa can't store power effectively either so they have to be able to provide for variable power generation day and night.

That's certainly the popular understanding, but I'm not sure how valid that argument is. Utility companies in the summer months complain about variable and heavy loads during business and afternoon hours, when AC and refrigeration loads are at their peak, with greatly reduced loads in the evenings. Since peak summertime electrical loads correspond with peak solar productivity, it seems to me that net-metering offers the utility a cushion against load variability rather than being a cause of it.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 8, 2017 2:10 pm
Exit Zero
(@Exit_Zero)
Noble Member

That's certainly the popular understanding, but I'm not sure how valid that argument is. Utility companies in the summer months complain about variable and heavy loads during business and afternoon hours, when AC and refrigeration loads are at their peak, with greatly reduced loads in the evenings. Since peak summertime electrical loads correspond with peak solar productivity, it seems to me that net-metering offers the utility a cushion against load variability rather than being a cause of it.

That is true where Utilities can easily buy more power from the grid they have access to.
Here in the VI we have no grid available to supplement our generators so responding to changes in demand is dependent on the power available from the generators online at the time.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 8, 2017 3:18 pm
singlefin
(@singlefin)
Prominent Member

I would thing energy use wouldn't spike too much in the summer because most of the big houses are empty, and businesses usually cut back hours or take extended vacations.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 8, 2017 3:26 pm
SkysTheLimit
(@SkysTheLimit)
Noble Member

To me it made more sense to buy a decent generator instead of batteries. That was 3 1/2 years ago. As stated above, the battery tech has gone up and the cost has come down. One day I might invest in batteries.

Question: If you go on batteries and off grid what do you do about rainy/shady days? I suppose your panel bank needs to be a bit "over-sized" to make sure you make enough?
For instance, we have a solar system but still have a WAPA bill. Just usually very small or a small credit. What happens when you "come up short" with batteries? Add panels?

Alan
St. Croix resident since 2000

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 8, 2017 3:32 pm
Page 1 / 4 Next
Close Menu
  
Working

Please Login or Register