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lcooper7
(@lcooper7)
Active Member

I am relocating to St Thomas at the end of January. It is a scary and exciting step. I am having a really hard time finding a list of apartments. I am also unsure as to what area would be safe for a female. I'm not under the impression that this is all going to be fun and sun. I am ready for hard work and whatever may come my way. I would appreciate any tips or advice.

Thank you

Quote
Topic starter Posted : January 4, 2012 3:07 am
Exit Zero
(@exit-zero)
Trusted Member Registered

Get yourself a room at a guest house for a week at least and start looking with the Island Trader for apt. ads, networking every minute for a job, meet people from all walks of life, get a food handlers card if you want a restaurant job and get a good map and start to learn the names of different areas - don't overpack - don't get wasted every night - ask questions and don't worry about sounding naive about them - many of us have been in the same position and are still here decades later.

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Posted : January 4, 2012 4:08 am
altlbts
(@altlbts)
New Member

We are moving to St. Thomas the first week of February. We will be living in Mahogany Run with family. Good luck to you! I am having issues with finding out about shipping some of our personal items. I wanted to ship my Sony TV but the family said their is a tax on it? Does anyone know about the taxes on goods? I've been googling and can't find anything. Thanks!

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 4, 2012 4:38 pm
ms411
(@ms411)
Expert

Ahh, the shortcomings of Google! The subject is covered in the book sold on this website "The Settler's Handbook." You should get a copy before making the move.

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Posted : January 4, 2012 4:59 pm
Jamison
(@Jamison)
Trusted Member

I made the move three weeks ago. I had a place to crash for a bit and a few contacts to get me started and they slayed it. I know half the island now, have a great job, working for great people a car and options on places to live.

I'm on STX, which from what I understand is the best one to live on.

I know on this island, if you're a woman and looking for restaurant work, it's pretty easy, considering there seems to be 10 guys to every woman. I went to a dozen places asking about bar shifts and they all said "sorry man, if you were a woman I would say yes". Not exactly the same on STT.

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Posted : January 4, 2012 6:10 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

I'm on STX, which from what I understand is the best one to live on.

I know on this island, if you're a woman and looking for restaurant work, it's pretty easy, considering there seems to be 10 guys to every woman. I went to a dozen places asking about bar shifts and they all said "sorry man, if you were a woman I would say yes". Not exactly the same on STT.

Careful with the assumptions, now!

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 4, 2012 6:20 pm
Jamison
(@Jamison)
Trusted Member

haha. Not an assumption. I know a few folks over there. It's the party night life island and there are a lot more women, compared to Stx, although we do pull some weight in the party department. The odds are good for the ladies here, but the goods are odd.

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Posted : January 4, 2012 6:50 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

haha. Not an assumption. I know a few folks over there. It's the party night life island and there are a lot more women, compared to Stx, although we do pull some weight in the party department. The odds are good for the ladies here, but the goods are odd.

Repeat - careful with the assumptions. Three weeks on island and you already know about a neighboring island because you "know a few folks over there"? In almost 30 years I've been to STX maybe just a dozen times and know several people there but wouldn't dream of casting an opinion on anything over there except maybe its topographical differences to the other Virgins. Enjoy your time here but remember that at least for the first year it's way more important to keep your ears open and your mouth shut than the other way around! 😀

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Posted : January 4, 2012 7:37 pm
blu4u
(@blu4u)
Trusted Member

From what I have observed, St Thomas contains
1) surplus of fresh, hungry, recently-relocated young men; as well as,
2) a surplus of crusty, old, island-worn, know-it-all women.

More eligible ladies (with rich daddy's) on STJ.

And if you think the VI has night life action, then you haven't lived in San Juan.....

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Posted : January 4, 2012 7:49 pm
lcooper7
(@lcooper7)
Active Member

Thank you guys.. I am going to order one of those relocating books too... It makes me feel alot better to know that It wont be terribly hard to find work. Can I apply for a service or food card online?

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : January 4, 2012 8:44 pm
blu4u
(@blu4u)
Trusted Member

[www.healthvi.org]

St. Thomas / St. John Office
1303 Hospital Ground Suite 10
Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, VI 00802
Voice: (340) 774-9000

More advice.

ALWAYS ALWAYS have someone walk you to your car after work. Check the rear view, make sure you are not followed.
Be careful who you tell where you live/work, especially if you are living alone.
If something feels "not right", trust your insintics.
Keep a flash light in your purse.
Keep bug spray in your purse.
Apply sun screen everyday before leaving the house. Wear a hat and sunglasses.
Drink lots of water. Keep three cases of bottle water in the house,
Have an "emergency fund" with enough cash to cover moving back home.
Have an active credit card with large enough available balance to cover an emergency flight home (no advance purchase discount).

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 4, 2012 8:55 pm
lcooper7
(@lcooper7)
Active Member

Thank you blu4u. I like to think of myself as pretty adaptable but a girl can never be to careful.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : January 4, 2012 9:50 pm
blu4u
(@blu4u)
Trusted Member

Agreed. Good luck is the result of smart choices. I have daughters, "smart choices", "calculating risks", "mitigating exposure" are on-going conversation in my home...

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 4, 2012 9:59 pm
ms411
(@ms411)
Expert

Jamison, I would love to know your definition of "good job." Many of the people I know have jobs that don't offer benefits of any kind, and quite a few are getting paid "under the table." If your job has benefits and a good salary, your contacts and situation sound like they're of a professional, specialized category that many people may not qualify for. It may be easy to get a job here that doesn't offer benefits, because most people that are here for the long run want a job with benefits.

I know a few people who work for the government, and they have horror stories about having to house people that, for whatever reason, are here and need or want to go back home because they've run out of money.

You can almost always tell the service workers who are here for "season" vs those who've been here for a few years.

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 4, 2012 10:18 pm
blu4u
(@blu4u)
Trusted Member

In current economic climate, "a good job" is defined as "one with regular hours that pays as promised, without involving illegal or life threatening behavior".
A great job would have benefits like paid vacation, supplemented health premiums.
A dream job has opportunity for advancement.
With so many educated and experienced folks un-employeed/under-employed, I find it hard to pass judgement on someone else's lively hood.
Good for you, Jamison. The longest journey starts with a single step.

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 4, 2012 10:30 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

From what I have observed, St Thomas contains
1) surplus of fresh, hungry, recently-relocated young men; as well as,
2) a surplus of crusty, old, island-worn, know-it-all women..

That''s really odd! I know several of those who fit into (1), maybe one or two that fit into (2) (but in no way would I categorize either group as a "surplus" by any stretch; and then there is the large number of those who fit into a category you didn't even mention which is, "very attractive, hard-working and bright young ladies".

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 4, 2012 10:32 pm
blu4u
(@blu4u)
Trusted Member

From what I have observed, St Thomas contains
1) surplus of fresh, hungry, recently-relocated young men; as well as,
2) a surplus of crusty, old, island-worn, know-it-all women..

That''s really odd! I know several of those who fit into (1), maybe one or two that fit into (2) (but in no way would I categorize either group as a "surplus" by any stretch; and then there is the large number of those who fit into a category you didn't even mention which is, "very attractive, hard-working and bright young ladies".

To be clear, I was reffering to my personal obersvations of "transplants" working in the hospitality industry, not native raised virgin islanders. Yes, the girls that grew up in the vi are, for the large part, lovely and work hard to build a future for themselves.
Lots of young dudes and cranky old bar maids.

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 4, 2012 10:47 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

To be clear, I was reffering to my personal obersvations of "transplants" working in the hospitality industry, not native raised virgin islanders. Yes, the girls that grew up in the vi are, for the large part, lovely and work hard to build a future for themselves.
Lots of young dudes and cranky old bar maids.

I assumed you were talking about transplants. "Recently-relocated" wasn't difficult to understand 😀 so that's what I was therefore referring to when I added the young woman category. So you think that category either doesn't exist or isn't worthy of mention? I'm confused. I hadn't narrowed my perception down to the hospitality industry but I don't think that makes a lot of all-around difference. Cranky old bar maids? I may have come across a couple of older female waitstaff who were rather cranky but I can't think of any cranky old barmaids. The original owner of the old Poorman's Bar was the crankiest bartender I ever encountered but he was male so doesn't count. If you know lots of cranky old barmaids then I'll take your word for it that they're out there somewhere unfamiliar to me. I rarely go out at night any more but nonetheless find it hard to believe that there are "lots" of them. Most places hire younger people for the job as it requires quite a lot of physical stamina.

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 5, 2012 12:30 am
blu4u
(@blu4u)
Trusted Member

[www.healthvi.org]

St. Thomas / St. John Office
1303 Hospital Ground Suite 10
Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, VI 00802
Voice: (340) 774-9000

More advice.

ALWAYS ALWAYS have someone walk you to your car after work. Check the rear view, make sure you are not followed.
Be careful who you tell where you live/work, especially if you are living alone.
If something feels "not right", trust your insintics.
Keep a flash light in your purse.
Keep bug spray in your purse.
Apply sun screen everyday before leaving the house. Wear a hat and sunglasses.
Drink lots of water. Keep three cases of bottle water in the house,
Have an "emergency fund" with enough cash to cover moving back home.
Have an active credit card with large enough available balance to cover an emergency flight home (no advance purchase discount).

@trainweak/Tart I stand by the above comment It's the same advice I give my own children.

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 5, 2012 1:22 am
Exit Zero
(@exit-zero)
Trusted Member Registered

Thank you guys.. It wont be terribly hard to find work. Can I apply for a service or food card online?

You must apply at the hospital in person for a food handlers card - it also requires a stool sample or a lab report from a very recent sample.

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 5, 2012 2:09 am
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

[www.healthvi.org]

St. Thomas / St. John Office
1303 Hospital Ground Suite 10
Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, VI 00802
Voice: (340) 774-9000

More advice.

ALWAYS ALWAYS have someone walk you to your car after work. Check the rear view, make sure you are not followed.
Be careful who you tell where you live/work, especially if you are living alone.
If something feels "not right", trust your insintics.
Keep a flash light in your purse.
Keep bug spray in your purse.
Apply sun screen everyday before leaving the house. Wear a hat and sunglasses.
Drink lots of water. Keep three cases of bottle water in the house,
Have an "emergency fund" with enough cash to cover moving back home.
Have an active credit card with large enough available balance to cover an emergency flight home (no advance purchase discount).

@trainweak/Tart I stand by the above comment It's the same advice I give my own children.

I didn't question this advice.:S

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 5, 2012 8:01 am
Bassman
(@bassman)
Advanced Member

My favorite bars, Duffy's on STT and Rhythms on STX, always seem to have pretty young ladies working there. Maybe that's why they're my favorites. Maybe good marketing on the owner's part.

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 5, 2012 1:26 pm
STXUSVI
(@STXUSVI)
Advanced Member

There is no tax on used household goods, only new items. Your Sony TV should be tax free.

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 5, 2012 1:44 pm
Jamison
(@Jamison)
Trusted Member

good job to me, means making money, honest owners, good place. I don't even know what benefits are. I've never had a seasonal kind of thought process.

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 5, 2012 2:04 pm
MACLEOD
(@MACLEOD)
Active Member

There is no tax on used household goods, only new items. Your Sony TV should be tax free.

Good luck taking it back home should you decide to leave.;)

ReplyQuote
Posted : January 7, 2012 1:20 pm
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