Safe places to live...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Safe places to live on St. Croix

Page 8 / 12
 
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

How fascinating (and I'm not being facetious) to read a description of life in the USVI which paints an overall picture that after decades of living here I simply can't recognize. I'm sorry that this is your perception but it simply goes to show that, for many people, living here just isn't a good match. It's a point we continually make in advising those moving here not to cut all ties and move lock, stock and barrel with the expectation of it being a forever home. It's a way bigger move than most prospective newcomers can imagine - easy for some and impossible for others. Thanks for sharing.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 2:27 pm
daveb722
(@daveb722)
Trusted Member

(tu)

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 3:08 pm
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert

wow, they were certainly bitter.

and btw-locals get teeth sucked at too and treated the same way you say you were at ALL of those institutions-btw, i have mostly been treated kindly.
and getting registration-you say there is no guidance but you also say there was always someone telling you which window to go to-that is guidance.

sorry you are so bitter.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 4:51 pm
midlifecrisis
(@midlifecrisis)
New Member

Not bitter, per-se, actually more sad than anything...just unwilling to walk around and say that the Emperor isn't naked....Not much into denial. Odd that 30 minutes ago I went somewhere to get some forms processed, one of which was a permit to export my car. The person handling the form looked at it and said - oh, you too? I hadn't mentioned anything. Then they told me how they too were in the process of moving to the states because of the systemic 'antipathy' as they called it toward those for whom we'll say, 'it is not a good match'. Then there is the shipper in the states that is processing my shipped goods who, very first thing asked, 'so why are you leaving'. After telling him that it is just 'not a good match', he said, last year we had much more going to the island and for some reason, there is now a flood of shipments coming back and nobody seems to be able to figure out why. Well, hmm....it may be a 'good match' for many who don't have any experience with a place where real hospitality actually exists and where you can leave your car in a parking area at a beach while you take a midnight stroll and come back and your windows are still in it, or where, when you are out at a beach bar trying to enjoy some good music, you don't have drunk/stoned lushes breathing in your woman's face. I guess many can turn away from that kind of junk for decades, but, I just prefer not too, and i don't think I'm alone. Maybe those for whom it is 'a good match' just need to have it to themselves. I'll take the 6 figures I poured into the economy each year somewhere where I feel more genuinely welcome. But I would suggest that some folks open their eyes and see the place the way the outside world does....your economic survival may depend on it. Call that bitter if you will...I was just giving my impression as do all posting here...

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 6:36 pm
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert

eyes wide open, but life-for the most part-is what you make it

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 6:45 pm
Cuntrygurlatheart
(@Cuntrygurlatheart)
New Member

I do agree that people who are wanting to move here need to be prepared that what they think is paradise may not be what they find here. There's a reason why people actually pay locals to go to the DMV for them.... I can say from experience that I personally have never seen such rudeness and what I would call just people who seem to be terribly unhappy. It's just a part of the life here. You either get used to it and learn how to deal with it, or you find your peace and happiness somewhere else. There's nothing wrong with that. It doesn't mean someone is bitter just because they see things from a different perspective. It's true perspective....... Some people's tolerance levels are higher.....Maybe some people have lived places where they WERE treated with respect no matter if you are a visitor or a native of that territory......and that feels really nice. I can see how living in St. Croix could give people a bitter taste and I believe it is mostly because the islanders themselves have a general disgust for visitors and new comers.... I know because I have experienced it over and over again. But, I have learned how to deal with it. I used to be intimidated by the women working for the DMV, Innovative and the grocery stores.... now I let them know they won't be rude to me and expect me to be nice back....... I don't let them get the best of me anymore...

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 7:36 pm
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

Have to say that MVB has changed for the better on STT under Mr. Olive's directorship. I never received the title for my truck when I registered it first, over 16 years ago and mentioned it to Mr. Olive last year while I was renewing my registration and he immediately had someone issue me one, no charge.
Good ting as already paid my $25 back then.

The lines aren't long and the overall experience is so much better than it ever was.
Anyone remember it taking 2 days in line to get your car inspected and registration renewed, with the line out the door and down the sidewalk and the fact that they had TVs set up with the staff watching soap operas instead of typing up your forms?

People have to do what makes them comfortable and their life satisfying.
I, myself, am planning a move after growing up and living here all these years.
Don't know whether it'll be a forever move or not and it's all fairly daunting.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 7:50 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

midlife: I am glad you posted. I think that there are a number of transplants who have the same reaction to life here that you are having. The VI is extremely different from Big America and you never know how it is going to affect you until you try.

This is why I always say: Come, stay 6 months, if it doesn't suit, it's okay. DO NOT sell everything back home and DO NOT burn your bridges.I hope that when you leave, you can at least tell yourself, "Well, at least I tried that!" All the best to you!

P.S.As these are your first posts, I hope you will come back here and let folks know a bit of your back story. What were you expecting? How long have you been here? What do you do?

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 9:51 pm
CaptainMalibu
(@CaptainMalibu)
Advanced Member

I guess I'll have to find out what all the hoopla is about the DMV. While I guess it could be worse than where I live now but I find the DMV visits I make here in Florida to be dreaded. They are staffed with unmotivated, inept individuals who look upon the sea of people waiting to bitch at them for not having the right paperwork, form, etc, etc, etc,. Long waits, multiple trips to come back with the right paperwork, leaving and coming back another day because the wait has been so long. Things like the DMV are evil necessities in life which we endure along the way to the better things in life. I think the key in all of this is appropriate expectations and the willingness to endure the not so fun aspects of life, whether it be on an island or in the big city, in exchange for the "paradise" aspects. Take the bad with the good. If it takes me 5 trips to the DMV to register my vehicle and get my driver's license, so be it. When I'm tooling around the island with the top off my jeep sporting my VI license plates, I'll have forgotten all about the DMV. I'm not dismissing the validity of all of the complaints, just offering a different perspective. That's what life and happiness is all about...perspective.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 10:42 pm
jonrobin
(@jonrobin)
Advanced Member

I am looking forward to finding out about island life for myself. We are coming in May and our plan is to stay for a year and then we will make another decision weather to stay or go back. I am a bit nervous about the crime but there is crime everywhere. I will try to become part of the community instead of just isolating ourselves. We are both very excited and can't wait to find out for ourselves if it is paradise or a nightmare like some say it will be. I don't want to look back on my life and say I should have done it.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 11:09 pm
Potter's Earring
(@Potter's_Earring)
Active Member

So proud of midlifescrisis for their posts. The geriatric apologists on this site usually dismiss valid complaints. I wish more transplants were like you two -- we'd really be able to make some change in the islands.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2016 11:30 pm
CaptainMalibu
(@CaptainMalibu)
Advanced Member

I am looking forward to finding out about island life for myself. We are coming in May and our plan is to stay for a year and then we will make another decision weather to stay or go back. I am a bit nervous about the crime but there is crime everywhere. I will try to become part of the community instead of just isolating ourselves. We are both very excited and can't wait to find out for ourselves if it is paradise or a nightmare like some say it will be. I don't want to look back on my life and say I should have done it.

I like how yo think. Reading in between the lines is a neccesity when browsing these forums. There are trends in posts from various contributors within these forums and nearly as much misinformation as there is accurate iand helpful Information. I feel that becoming a part of the community as you mentioned is key. In fact that's one of the things I look forward to. Most Crucians are good folks. Most transplants are good folks. Personally I think those who do isolate are a bit insulting to those who are true islanders. Having had the opportunity to spend a good deal of time visiting various islands, I find a rich culture and a close knit group of folks who have a way of life I am interested in integrating into my own. We will be arriving the very end of May. Perhaps our paths will cross. If so, the first round is on me!

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 6, 2016 1:55 am
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

So proud of midlifescrisis for their posts. The geriatric apologists on this site usually dismiss valid complaints. I wish more transplants were like you two -- we'd really be able to make some change in the islands.

Geriatric apologists? Assuming you're referring to longtime island residents, maybe you should read more before blithely throwing out such a glittering generality. If you did (and presuming you know how to comprehend the written word) you would find that this sector offers very realistic observations on living here in contrast to a few newcomers who've barely got their feet wet but urge others to, "come on down!"

It seems quite ludicrous that you're offering as an example of someone who could "really make a change in our islands" is one of the very many who leave because living here doesn't meet their expectations. Maybe you just don't see the irony.

Those of us who've lived here for many years have seen hundreds (if not thousands) come and go for many and varied reasons. Living here has suited us and we call this "home" but we fully understand - and never fail to say it - that the life here simply isn't for everyone. We are not "apologists" by any stretch of a fertile imagination.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 6, 2016 10:47 am
quirion
(@quirion)
Advanced Member

Wife and I did our first BMV trip a month ago.
Getting VI licenses. Looked up what to bring. Went from window to window as asked and while waiting to be called for our picture taking I had gone to the reg/title window to inquire about what i need to do to get my truck title given the dealer neglected to give me one.
They said you need to get a duplicate title ordered..then said wait... you never got the original? Bring me your registration and ID. 2 minutes later she handed me my title and documents. Then we went and got our picture taken. 40 minutes. Easy. Everyone was nice.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 6, 2016 11:13 am
jonrobin
(@jonrobin)
Advanced Member

Captain we are set to get there mid May if all goes well with the hospital interview in April. I hope our paths cross as well. To all the frequent poster , thanks. Your insight into island life has helped us to make the choice to come down to try it. You all have been very helpful. I will try to return the favor by posting my thoughts as we move forward and after we have been ghere for awhile.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 6, 2016 12:28 pm
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert

heck, one time at the dmv ( not a long wait and pleasant people ) i even got a christmas time goodie bag.

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 6, 2016 2:22 pm
melro52
(@melro52)
Active Member

Live in a gated community and that solves whatever mostly breaking and entering problem that is there. I live downriver Detroit in the boonies on Lake Erie and have a home alarm that calls the police because crime is everywhere. Everywhere means islands too.

Thinking that an island is any different because it's oh so beautiful is not reality. A lot of local island people, this includes Hawaii, have attitude and I hear them on that one. So stay out of their area for one. And now that I'm older, I have no desire to live out and away from people because it's just not safe. Before we bought a condo on St. Croix we looked all over the Big Island of Hawaii, and there were plenty of places there that were not safe either. The natives don't like us at all. So there you are.

Think big city. Stay away from projects. Don't frequent the local's areas much unless it's a festival, then don't get drunk and be a target like anywhere else. Just about every island in the Caribbean has a section or area that is not real friendly. If it's a lonely stretch of beach, maybe take a baseball bat with you because hey, you're out there alone all right. Thinking everyone is an angel because the scenery is beautiful will get you in a bind. It's that simple. Enjoy but be prudent EVERYWHERE.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 1, 2016 6:34 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

Living in a gated community doesn't guarantee you greater safety from break-inas as many residents of those communities have discovered. A certain deterrent, yes, but that's all. Stay out of areas where locals live, don't frequent places where locals go? Wow, that sort of "information" reeks of racism and precisely the sort of attitude which will make you a target. Be safe in your insular existence in the islands but don't expect to be made welcome outside your little ivory tower. Being prudent is a no-brainer, preaching division in the terms you use really stinks.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 1, 2016 6:54 pm
AandA2VI
(@AandA2VI)
Trusted Member

Lol for sure OT. I'm thinking that guys a troll for sure. Worst advice ever... although I did laugh.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 3, 2016 6:07 am
STTsailor
(@STTsailor)
Trusted Member

I can easily relate to some of the comments by midlife.
I am here for the weather, ocean and sailing. I met some nice local people but overal when doing business on the island I generally feel not welcome. I am not sure why that is the case. Is this racism, envy, xenophobia? Is the culture gap too large to bridge? It puzzles me as I lived internationally and traveled extensively and never really encountered such a unwarranted negativity towards visitors.

I am glad that once in a while someone posts here omitting PC and calls it as it is. This way I know it is not just my impression.

I am trying to make the best of it. Growing thicker skin, get efficient with chores, focus on the core reasons Im here.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 3, 2016 2:25 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

STTsailor: Your priorities are the weather, ocean and sailing. It's unfortunate that your interaction with the locals isn't what you expected based on your experience of "living internationally and traveling extensively" but I don't agree with your comment, "I am glad that once in a while someone posts here omitting PC and calls it as it is. This way I know it is not just my impression."

That comment seems to indicate that your perception is that newcomers in general take that "PC" route as a matter of course and that they all feel the same. Simply not true. I was once a newbie and not once did I think of someone being standoffish with me (or even rude) a reflection of their being "local" but simply that they were just having a bad day or maybe a bad string of days. Never looked upon it (and still don't after decades here) as being something to stamp as inherently/irrevocably divisive. After years of watching people come and go I have a pretty good sense of who'll fit in and enjoy their life here (however long or short a duration it may be) and those who'll never feel truly comfortable. You've been here a very short time and your impressions may well change over time as you get to know more "locals". I hope so.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 3, 2016 3:21 pm
singlefin
(@singlefin)
Trusted Member

The longer I'm here, the more I notice how annoying some folks from the states truly are. When their not arguing and complaining to locals, their arguing and complaining umongst one another.

So glad I escaped when I could!

It seems to me that some people are just wired differently and changing the environment that surrounds them is just a temporary fix. As others have said already, island life isnt for everyone (thank goodness). Lets keep them medicated on Cruzan Rum and Captain Morgan, then get them home before they revert back to their natural state.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 3, 2016 6:34 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

It seems to me that some people are just wired differently and changing the environment that surrounds them is just a temporary fix.

Wherever you go, you and your baggage are right alongside!

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 3, 2016 6:49 pm
STTsailor
(@STTsailor)
Trusted Member

I think there is a value in descending opinions that is why I posted. While newcomers like me are perhaps not yet immune to the grind of STT hence we have different vantage point. Eventually if we elect to stay we will probably to some extend embrace "the way of life"here.. Legalizing that MJ may help with acceptance.

However, another point I want to make is that influx of educated, entrepreneurial mainlanders may actually be a tipping point in this so called island life and drive for change. We now represent 25% of population here. If we get it past 50%, combating with locals who lived/educated in the mainland and know that things can be better, eventually we will prevail and change. We will not quietly stand corruption, lawlessness, poor services and infrastructure.

I tend to look at USVI as paradise in the making. It is a long term project but I welcome and embrace positive changes here. One day at atime.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 3, 2016 7:39 pm
OldTart
(@the-oldtart)
Expert

Had to have a good chuckle - "immune to the grind ...", " ... influx of educated, entrepreneurial mainlanders may actually be a tipping point in this so called island life and drive for change ..."

Do you really think after a little more than a year here that you're part of a new renaissance of a paradise in the making? I hate to throw a very wet blanket over you but such magical groups with lofty ideas of changing the islands to suit their vision have been regularly coming and regularly going as long as I've been here.

"So called" island life? For however long you're here you can contribute to the community and imprint your positive footstep within it but if you seriously think you're going to change the island to conform to your perception of paradise then I fear the disappointment will come sooner rather than later.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 3, 2016 8:37 pm
Page 8 / 12
Close Menu