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AandA2VI
(@AandA2VI)
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August 11, 2012 1:14 am  

Soooo about containers???? LOL, chill everyone. No need for any drama. Wosah my island friends 🙂 How bad was that storm that went through last week?? I was watching it.


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stxem
(@stx-em)
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August 11, 2012 2:26 am  

Yeah, and I'm being called dishonest on the other thread for not turning in my stateside license....:S

Storm was nothing. It passed way south of us. Got some nice rain, a few wind gusts, higher waves and that was it. Eyes are now on TD7, although that should pass south too.


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VIsnorkeler
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August 12, 2012 12:25 am  

LOL!!! I thought the question got answered...or was that a different young couple moving? We did no container. We were dumb and mailed our stuff (at least a dozen good-sized boxes) to general delivery. Dumb, because it could have turned out badly. LUCKY, because we got every single one of them within four weeks. Not one box was disturbed in ANY way. We sold his truck. We stored my car and the contents of his house that he wanted to keep or didn't sell on e-bay/yard sale. After about a year, we went back to visit relatives and sold MY car, pulled some things out of storage, sold a few things, then just kept the remainder in the unit. Now, our situation is probably very different from yours, OP. Kerry and I are not in our 20s anymore...he built the storage unit, so actually he pays nothing for the unit with his beloved iron/marble furniture and 1 billion gallon fish tank...my mom actually MISSES seeing my car in her driveway and is taking very good care of Kerry's houseplants and thoroughly enjoying his artwork on her walls...so we kinda have a perfect set-up for any of our things that we love, but don't really want to ship all over the earth, because we, while we love it here, we expect to get itchy feet again sooner or later and will be off on our next adventure. 🙂


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VIsnorkeler
(@VIsnorkeler)
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August 12, 2012 12:30 am  

TD7 has fallen apart...hope we get some rain out of it, anyway.


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applepie
(@applepie)
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August 14, 2012 3:40 am  

Just for the record there is no such certification or certification agency in the United States for service animals. Certain disabled people are entitled to use service animals to assist them in their everyday life events. The disabled can individually train their animal to meet their needs or receive a trained dog from one of the many agencies or organizations. If an individual is not disabled and attempts to use the family pet to circumvent various laws and fee's it is a federal offense. The ADA is very clear about this. To be considered a service animal it should be able to assist the person with life functions that the disabled person can't do without help. If one is questioned by a business or an official which is allowed by law the individual should be prepared to prove his/her disabilty.


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blu4u
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August 14, 2012 2:31 pm  

If one is questioned by a business or an official which is allowed by law the individual should be prepared to prove his/her disabilty.

Baloney!

"The regulations provide that a public accommodation may not ask about the nature or extent of a person’s disability, but that it generally may make two inquiries to determine whether an animal qualifies as a service animal; it may ask: (1) if the animal is required because of a disability, and (2) what work or task the animal has been trained to perform. These inquiries may not be made, however, when it is readily apparent that the animal is a service animal, such as where a guide dog is guiding a blind person or a dog is pulling a wheelchair.

Furthermore, a public accommodation may not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal. Nor may a public accommodation require a person with a disability to pay a surcharge for a service animal, even if it applies such a surcharge for pets.

These regulations will not apply to landlords or airlines, which are governed by the Fair Housing Act and the Air Carrier Access Act, respectively."

Baiscally, flying your service animal in at the discression of the airline. Any accomodation given to service dogs is stricly between the airline, the disabled person and the dog.

Americans with disabilities Act 1991, Amended march 2011.


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Bombi
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August 14, 2012 2:43 pm  

3. Q: How can I tell if an animal is really a service animal and not just a pet?

A: Some, but not all, service animals wear special collars and harnesses. Some, but not all, are licensed or certified and have identification papers. If you are not certain that an animal is a service animal, you may ask the person who has the animal if it is a service animal required because of a disability. However, an individual who is going to a restaurant or theater is not likely to be carrying documentation of his or her medical condition or disability. Therefore, such documentation generally may not be required as a condition for providing service to an individual accompanied by a service animal. Although a number of states have programs to certify service animals, you may not insist on proof of state certification before permitting the service animal to accompany the person with a disability.

http://www.ada.gov/qasrvc.htm

The only questions a public entity may ask a service animal handler is:
1) Do you have a disability (a yes/no question)?
2) What tasks does the animal perform?
No one may ask, "What is your disability?


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applepie
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August 14, 2012 4:10 pm  

No Baloney Blue
The ADA covers all commercial transportation all. Read Chapter One not the short sheet. Not all disabilities are apparent or obvious, the person or organization must be satiisfied with the verbal assurance that the dog is a service dog. If they are not satisfied (Guess
What) no entry no free pass. All Disabled people that use a service dog know first hand. and whats expected and what the problems are. They are preparded to deal with them.

Maybe you can show me where you found that flying is not covered by the ADA!


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watruw8ing4
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August 14, 2012 4:22 pm  

If one is questioned by a business or an official which is allowed by law the individual should be prepared to prove his/her disabilty.

Baloney!

"The regulations provide that a public accommodation may not ask about the nature or extent of a person’s disability, but that it generally may make two inquiries to determine whether an animal qualifies as a service animal; it may ask: (1) if the animal is required because of a disability, and (2) what work or task the animal has been trained to perform. These inquiries may not be made, however, when it is readily apparent that the animal is a service animal, such as where a guide dog is guiding a blind person or a dog is pulling a wheelchair.

Furthermore, a public accommodation may not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal. Nor may a public accommodation require a person with a disability to pay a surcharge for a service animal, even if it applies such a surcharge for pets.

These regulations will not apply to landlords or airlines, which are governed by the Fair Housing Act and the Air Carrier Access Act, respectively."

Baiscally, flying your service animal in at the discression of the airline. Any accomodation given to service dogs is stricly between the airline, the disabled person and the dog.

Americans with disabilities Act 1991, Amended march 2011.

The only baloney I see is the statement that the airline carrier can ask a person what their disability is. Not sure where your ADA quote ended. But the statement that airline accommodation is up to the airlines is not correct. Under the ACA, airlines can use stricter requirements than the ADA. Although they aren't allowed to ask a person what disability they have, they can go so far as to ask for a letter from the flyer's medical professional stating that the person has a disability, if they don't believe the flyer's statements are credible. And can deny them carriage if they don't have it.


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blu4u
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August 14, 2012 5:01 pm  

Sorry if I was unclear. The airlines or any business, can "extend" the accomodation mandated by ADA. If the airlines want to allow certain pets, classes of baggage or passangers to fly at discount or "free" then it the airlines choice. Not your choice or my choice.


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applepie
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August 14, 2012 5:18 pm  

ADA does not allow a charge for a service animal!


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blu4u
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August 14, 2012 5:31 pm  

Correct. The airlinse can alos waive fees for non-service animals f they choose. Airline's choice.


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blu4u
(@blu4u)
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August 14, 2012 5:40 pm  

If one is questioned by a business or an official which is allowed by law the individual should be prepared to prove his/her disabilty.

Baloney!

"The regulations provide that a public accommodation may not ask about the nature or extent of a person’s disability, but that it generally may make two inquiries to determine whether an animal qualifies as a service animal; it may ask: (1) if the animal is required because of a disability, and (2) what work or task the animal has been trained to perform. These inquiries may not be made, however, when it is readily apparent that the animal is a service animal, such as where a guide dog is guiding a blind person or a dog is pulling a wheelchair.

Furthermore, a public accommodation may not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal. Nor may a public accommodation require a person with a disability to pay a surcharge for a service animal, even if it applies such a surcharge for pets.

These regulations will not apply to landlords or airlines, which are governed by the Fair Housing Act and the Air Carrier Access Act, respectively."

Baiscally, flying your service animal in at the discression of the airline. Any accomodation given to service dogs is stricly between the airline, the disabled person and the dog.

Americans with disabilities Act 1991, Amended march 2011.

The only baloney I see is the statement that the airline carrier can ask a person what their disability is. Not sure where your ADA quote ended. But the statement that airline accommodation is up to the airlines is not correct. Under the ACA, airlines can use stricter requirements than the ADA. Although they aren't allowed to ask a person what disability they have, they can go so far as to ask for a letter from the flyer's medical professional stating that the person has a disability, if they don't believe the flyer's statements are credible. And can deny them carriage if they don't have it.

The airlines can also use less strict enforcement. The airline can "extend accomodations" or waive or discount fees at thier indepenant discrection as lond as they comply with FAA regulations for safety ect.

Frankly, I'm tired of this....


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applepie
(@applepie)
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August 14, 2012 6:04 pm  

Why do you make things up to cover your complete misunderstanding of the printed material. I guess that's what makes you tired.


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Bombi
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August 14, 2012 6:14 pm  

American Airlines and American Eagle accept service animals used by persons with disabilities at no charge. An animal may accompany a customer with a disability in the aircraft cabin, provided the animal can be accommodated without obstructing an aisle or other area used for emergency evacuations.

If a service animal is disruptive or too large to fit under the seat or at the passenger's feet without encroaching on another passenger's space or protruding into the aisle, it will need to travel in a kennel (provided by the passenger) in the cargo hold. The kennel must meet IATA kennel and size requirements for the animal. Temperature restrictions apply to ensure the safety of the animal.

There is no charge for service animals used by customers with disabilities. A harness, tag or vest indicating status as a service animal will be helpful in distinguishing them to airport personnel. However, credible verbal assurance that the animal is providing a service to assist with a disability will suffice should an inquiry be made.

View a list of animal relief areas at select airports. If your airport is not listed, please ask for directions or assistance at our ticket counter.

For information regarding working dogs, please see our Traveling With Pets page page.

Quarantine restrictions may apply. Your reservations agent or travel agent will be happy to check destination regulations for you.

and

Emotional Support or Psychiatric Service Animals
Emotional support and psychiatric service animals provide emotional support to an individual with a mental health-related disability. In accordance with the Department of Transportation, we require appropriate documentation 48 hours before departure to permit emotional support and psychiatric service animals to travel in the passenger cabin.

To make arrangements for the transportation of an emotional support or psychiatric service animal, please call Reservations at 1-800-433-7300 at least 48 hours before your flight.

We require current documentation (no later than one (1) year from the date of the passenger's scheduled initial flight). The documentation must meet the following criteria:

On letterhead of a licensed mental health professional including a medical doctor specifically treating the passenger's mental or emotional disability (e.g., psychiatrist, psychologist, licensed clinical social worker) stating the following:

that passenger has a mental health related disability recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM IV)
the passenger needs the emotional support or psychiatric service animal as an accommodation for air travel and/or for activity at the passenger's destination
the individual providing the assessment is a licensed mental health professional and the passenger is under his or her professional care
the date and type of the mental health professional's license and the state or other jurisdiction in which it was issued
Plan to check in one hour before the check-in time for the general public for document verification.
All of the above specific criteria must be provided to accept your emotional support or psychiatric service animal for travel in the passenger cabin. If all requirements are not met, the animal will travel as a pet in the cabin or cargo.


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watruw8ing4
(@watruw8ing4)
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August 15, 2012 4:51 am  

No Baloney Blue
The ADA covers all commercial transportation all. Read Chapter One not the short sheet. Not all disabilities are apparent or obvious, the person or organization must be satiisfied with the verbal assurance that the dog is a service dog. If they are not satisfied (Guess
What) no entry no free pass. All Disabled people that use a service dog know first hand. and whats expected and what the problems are. They are preparded to deal with them.

Maybe you can show me where you found that flying is not covered by the ADA!

Just to clarify because there is some understandable confusion. ADA does not dictate the airline regulations. ACAA does. The AA guidelines Bombi posted are following ACAA to the letter.

Federal Register on ACAA regulations


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