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USVI of Strategic Importance to the USA  

 

Lucy
 Lucy
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February 29, 2012 1:58 pm  

The Dept. of Interior has provided a life-line. This adds up to just shy of $3M. It's a start - right? A drop in the bucket until they meet again next year.

"The territories are extremely important to the United States and to the president," said Secretary Salazar. "They are of strategic importance and we have a major stake in making sure that they are strong."

http://stthomassource.com/content/news/local-news/2012/02/28/territory-gets-fed-revitalization-grants

There is one fundamental issue that everyone is missing or is not addressing. The USVI with 110,000 residents, but has the same (or some think should be the same) government infrastructure as a state, with a Governor, Lt. Governor, cabinet positions, legislature and many departments. As an example, the state of Florida has 18 million people. And Hawaii has the least in population at 1.3 million .... which is more than 10x that of the USVI. There is no way the USVI can sustain this (both in quality of services and budget) and be equal to a state.

There needs to be some serious consolidation. Or maybe the territories should have a single government in order to share services? American Samoa and Guam are under the same economic hardship.


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DaChief
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February 29, 2012 3:20 pm  

Strategic importance? Let's review our history....STT was predominently preferred to offset submarine threats to the shipping lanes serving the Panama Canal. This was by seaplane (PBY's) generally. There was also a 2nd Fleet from 1950 to 2011- but primarily- our role was anti-submarine forward base to protect shipping lanes. The top down command was the US Atlantic Fleet...A large contingent of the Caribbean Naval Force was concentrated at Roosevelt Roads.

These are obsolete ideas- most ASW is sea based and very mobile- remember that sonar stuff and radar stuff in the 20th Century were in their infancy. Today, command and control can forward deploy ships and initiate and target from hundreds of miles away- not to mention aviation platforms.

Our biggest strategic resource was the refinery- which would have furnished a large portion of jet fuel....Apparently no longer...


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OldTart
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February 29, 2012 3:21 pm  

Or maybe the territories should have a single government in order to share services? American Samoa and Guam are under the same economic hardship.

It was just a couple of years ago that one of the Guam senators feared that the island would "tip over" because of overpopulation, a televised remark which echoed throughout the world. Just the kind of voice we need in a "single government" to add to our own woes, 😀


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Lucy
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February 29, 2012 3:35 pm  

Or maybe the territories should have a single government in order to share services? American Samoa and Guam are under the same economic hardship.

It was just a couple of years ago that one of the Guam senators feared that the island would "tip over" because of overpopulation, a televised remark which echoed throughout the world. Just the kind of voice we need in a "single government" to add to our own woes, 😀

Tart --> you offer critical comment but no solution. We have our own set of woes with senators. Here is just one example.

http://www.legvi.org/vilegsearch/Detail.aspx?docentry=17612

One needs a solid plan first --> then you can sweep out the dust. :S


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OldTart
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February 29, 2012 3:50 pm  

Or maybe the territories should have a single government in order to share services? American Samoa and Guam are under the same economic hardship.

It was just a couple of years ago that one of the Guam senators feared that the island would "tip over" because of overpopulation, a televised remark which echoed throughout the world. Just the kind of voice we need in a "single government" to add to our own woes, 😀

Tart --> you offer critical comment but no solution. We have our own set of woes with senators. Here is just one example.

http://www.legvi.org/vilegsearch/Detail.aspx?docentry=17612

One needs a solid plan first --> then you can sweep out the dust. :S

Is a little levity against forum rules?


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trainwreck82
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February 29, 2012 3:59 pm  

Or maybe the territories should have a single government in order to share services? American Samoa and Guam are under the same economic hardship.

It was just a couple of years ago that one of the Guam senators feared that the island would "tip over" because of overpopulation, a televised remark which echoed throughout the world. Just the kind of voice we need in a "single government" to add to our own woes, 😀

Believe it or not, that was actually a US Congressman - Rep Hank Johnson (D-Ga). Almost too absurd to believe.


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OldTart
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February 29, 2012 4:26 pm  

Believe it or not, that was actually a US Congressman - Rep Hank Johnson (D-Ga). Almost too absurd to believe.

Which proves that stupidity in some representatives is universal and definitely not confined to the US Virgin Islands. (tu)


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rotorhead
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February 29, 2012 5:36 pm  

There is one fundamental issue that everyone is missing or is not addressing. The USVI with 110,000 residents, but has the same (or some think should be the same) government infrastructure as a state, with a Governor, Lt. Governor, cabinet positions, legislature and many departments. As an example, the state of Florida has 18 million people. And Hawaii has the least in population at 1.3 million .... which is more than 10x that of the USVI. There is no way the USVI can sustain this (both in quality of services and budget) and be equal to a state.

There needs to be some serious consolidation. Or maybe the territories should have a single government in order to share services? American Samoa and Guam are under the same economic hardship.

Actually Wyoming is the least populous state with a population of 563,626. How do they reduce expenses? By not acting bigger than they really are. The legislature is part time and they only get paid when they meet. They all have real jobs. They drive their own personal vehicles and get paid mileage when they use them for legislative business. They also limit how often the legislature can meet. These austerity rules also apply to the executive branch.

From their citizen's guide:

A Citizen Legislature. Wyoming remains one of the few states having a true part-time citizen legislature. While this may keep Wyoming legislators in closer touch with their constituents, it also means that they do not enjoy the same accommodations provided to full-time legislators in larger states. For example, legislators in Wyoming do not have individual staff. As noted below, staff services for Wyoming legislators are provided by a small permanent central staff agency (the LSO) and by temporary session staff. Office accommodations are similarly austere. Except for a few officers of the House and Senate, members of the legislature are not provided offices in the Capitol nor do they maintain full-time offices in their districts. While in session, the "office" of a typical Wyoming legislator consists of the legislator's desk on the floor of the House or Senate and one or two file cabinet drawers in a committee meeting room. Except for the relatively short periods of time they meet each year in Cheyenne for the annual legislative session, Wyoming legislators can be contacted at home or at their places of business.

Legislative Sessions.
The Legislature meets in general session in odd numbered years, beginning on the second Tuesday of January. The general session is limited to 40 legislative days, but generally lasts around 38 days.
The Legislature meets in budget session in even numbered years, beginning on the second Monday of February. A typical budget session lasts 20 legislative days. Except for the budget bill, any other bill requires a 2/3rds vote of the House or Senate for introduction in a budget session.
Special sessions of the Legislature may be called at any time by the governor.


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rotorhead
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February 29, 2012 5:44 pm  

One of my favorite Low-IQ Senators. The US Senator from Arkansas. Listen to what he says.
http://videosift.com/video/Bill-Mahers-Interview-with-a-Low-IQ-Senator-Religulous


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Lucy
 Lucy
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February 29, 2012 6:53 pm  

RH, good catch. I looked at several smaller states, but should have focused on the mid-West. In any case, you have quantified what the USVI should be modeled after when it has a beer income and can not afford the champagne appetite.


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Beeski
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February 29, 2012 7:40 pm  

Never under-estimate how little the Federal Government cares about the USVI.


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DUN
 DUN
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March 1, 2012 12:05 am  

The Arkansas Senator would be a genius here!


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rotorhead
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March 1, 2012 2:45 am  

The Arkansas Senator would be a genius here!

I love it when he chuckles and says "You don't have to pass an IQ test to be in the senate". Then he leans back and gets this really stupid grin on his face as he realizes what he has said.


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