Bartending or worki...
 
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Bartending or working on boat?

 
greggts
(@greggts)
Active Member

Let me first say to everyone on the board, thanks for all the help with past questions and future ones! Your help has been instrumental in my soon to be permanent move. I obviously have another question. I am arriving on island June 25th and will immediately need to get a job. I have a few avenues that I can take but I am wondering which do yall think would be a safer (IE financially) bet for me to take when I first get down. I have a few bartending jobs on the table (relatively popular and busy) and also have a few boat jobs as well (low end of the stick, washing boats...). Do you think that I could support myself working on a boat or is a job making big money (bartending) necessary. I am coming down with plenty of money to pay first last and security with a little change left over. Ideas?? Thanks again!

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Topic starter Posted : June 5, 2007 6:36 pm
Linda J
(@Linda_J)
Expert

Which island?

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Posted : June 5, 2007 8:18 pm
Juanita
(@Juanita)
Expert

Hi greggts,

My opinion depends on a few things. As a general rule, bartenders make really good money. Mates on the popular day boats make really good money. The guys cleaning up the boats don't make much. It really all depends on which bar versus which boat.

Arriving June 25 means jobs can be scarce. Probably have better luck getting a bartending job. The day boats have trouble meeting their minimum numbers, so they don't go out everyday. Some just shut down for the off season.

I would suggest a bar with a local following, not completely dependent on tourists. Which island? Red Hook on St. Thomas is lousy with bars that the "locals" frequent.

There was a thread about a month ago about how much bartenders make. Try doing a search. You might find it interesting.

Good luck and welcome. Juanita

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Posted : June 5, 2007 10:18 pm
greggts
(@greggts)
Active Member

I really appreciate your help on this one. I was thinking about working in a bar in red hook but if it is really slow I might try to find a job doing both (bar and boat). If anyone knows of any current boat jobs open I would love to get in contact with you. Please let me know! thanks again. Also keep the suggestions coming!

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Topic starter Posted : June 6, 2007 1:25 am
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

You will want to get your health card before you hit the streets. You will have to have one to work in food and beverage.

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Posted : June 6, 2007 9:30 pm
Juanita
(@Juanita)
Expert

Good point about the health card. Also, some of the day boats may require mates to have STCW (Standards of Training Certification and Watchkeeping). I've been out of the "boat loop" for a while, so I don't know who requires it and if they bother to enforce it. I know there are plenty of mates out there who don't have it.

A health card is easy to get and costs about $60.

STCW is an actual course and costs several hundred dollars. Obviously, if it's required, a potential employer will tell you during the interview. It would probably be quicker and cheaper to take the course in the states, and that would make you more attractive to an employer, if you already had it. But, that's making an investment you may not be interested in, and may not be necessary.

Maybe someone else knows more about the requirements and can offer an opinion on whether it is necessary.

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Posted : June 7, 2007 11:26 am
G-Dub-Ya
(@G-Dub-Ya)
Advanced Member

I worked on a boat when I lived in STT over the past year. They often are hiring and jobs include bartending on the boat while taking tourists from the cruise ships to STJ to snorkel at Trunk Bay. There are always adds for the position in the daily paper. The boat is called the Leyland Sneed. Hope this helps.

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Posted : June 7, 2007 5:21 pm
Teresa
(@Teresa)
Trusted Member

Ahhh, the Sneed! I worked for SeaBlaster and we battled for dock space every once in a while. I have to say, working on the dock or one of the tour boats is the best. Pay is up and down as it is completely dependent on the tourists and their tips, however some of the dock jobs are set pay. A lot of people ran tours during the day and would bartend or wait tables at night. You would make enough money to get by, but not a lot of time off for play.

Teresa

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Posted : June 8, 2007 8:45 pm
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