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Blue Laws

 
BeachPhilosopher
(@BeachPhilosopher)
Advanced Member

Good Evening. Someone recently asked about the drinking age and that made me wonder what, if any, crazy blue laws are in force down in the Islands? I lived in Indiana until recently and I'll give you just a taste of the crazy $@*T they do up there.

You cannot buy alcohol of any kind on Sunday, except at a restaurant.
You cannot buy cold beer at a grocery store, gas station, or convenience store
If you attempt to purchase beer, wine, or liquor at a grocery store your entire party is likely to be carded. (I actually had a friend told he could not purchase beer because another 35 year old friend was with him)
Anyone under the age of 21 cannot walk through the front door of a bar or liquor store.

After living there for three years I decided that a benchmark for a society to call itself civilized is the ability of its citizenry to purchase cold beer, from a gas station, on the most holy day of the week for that society's dominate religion.

Cheers.

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Topic starter Posted : March 21, 2009 3:21 am
Trade
(@Trade)
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You can't buy drinks on Good Friday until after 4:00 PM (I think it's 4:00 PM)

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Posted : March 21, 2009 10:41 am
Lizard
(@Lizard)
Trusted Member

The Dominate World Religion is Muslim.

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Posted : March 21, 2009 11:14 am
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

Lizard: I am not sure how you mean dominant, but Christianity still has more adherents, according to my 2008 almanac 2.1 billion to 1.34 billion for Islam.

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Posted : March 21, 2009 12:55 pm
Lizard
(@Lizard)
Trusted Member

East Ender,
Sorry I made a mistake, ABC nightly news had stated that Islam had surpassed christianity, so open mouth insert foot, Islam is Number 2 according to what is written. Sorry! However adherents of islam don't drink beer, so blue laws have no meaning to them.

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Posted : March 21, 2009 1:28 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

I wouldn't trust anything ABC says! 😉

And about Blue Laws...Many years ago in Texas, you couldn't buy clothes, appliances and a whole list of items on Sunday. The malls were closed. There were sections of the grocery stores that were roped off. Those were dark days for shoppers. 🙁 Really made you blue.

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Posted : March 21, 2009 2:06 pm
aschultz
(@aschultz)
Advanced Member

On St.croix you can buy a single beer at a gas station. Then they will open it for you in the gas station. You can walk out take a sip in front of a cop and drive away. I love it.

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Posted : March 21, 2009 4:19 pm
Lizard
(@Lizard)
Trusted Member

East Ender,
Those exact same Blue Laws are still in effect In Bergen County NJ. That is the county that connects NYC via the George Washington Bridge.

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Posted : March 21, 2009 9:12 pm
rotorhead
(@rotorhead)
Trusted Member

This sounds like a separation of church and state issue. Why is the Christian holy day the only one protected from drunks? What about those of us who are godless? Shouldn't we be allowed to drink anytime we wish? When it comes to religion based morallity laws, please keep them to yourselves.

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Posted : March 21, 2009 10:18 pm
BeachPhilosopher
(@BeachPhilosopher)
Advanced Member

This sounds like a separation of church and state issue. Why is the Christian holy day the only one protected from drunks? What about those of us who are godless? Shouldn't we be allowed to drink anytime we wish? When it comes to religion based morality laws, please keep them to yourselves.

It sound like a 1st Amendment right because...well it should be, but Sky Father brings home the bacon (and the votes) in Hoosier state. I think the general attitude is that we the Godless should keep our filthy devil-powered rationality and laws to ourselves.

BTW There is a great song by Bad Religion titled "Don't Pray On Me". If you're not familiar with it you should check it out.

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Topic starter Posted : March 22, 2009 3:01 am
Lizard
(@Lizard)
Trusted Member

Hey RotorHead,
Where did the Drunk come in, This was about being able to buy it on Sunday (Church and State?). Question, who died and left you in charge as to what should or can be posted?

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Posted : March 22, 2009 3:59 am
Edward
(@Edward)
Trusted Member

I grew up in Philadelphia in the 1930s and 1940s. Movies were closed on Sundays, and so were nearly all shops. No baseball games (or any other professional sports) could be played on Sundays. Alcoholic beverages were sold only in "State Stores," and they were closed on Sundays and holidays.

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Posted : March 22, 2009 6:50 am
aquaponics
(@aquaponics)
Advanced Member

I wouldn't worry about our 1 Sunday law (Good Friday) rotorhead. It's enforced about as much as speeding is here!

"You can't buy drinks on Good Friday until after 4:00 PM (I think it's 4:00 PM)"

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Posted : March 22, 2009 10:00 am
Trade
(@Trade)
Expert

Shouldn't we be allowed to drink anytime we wish?

You can. Just buy it the day before.

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Posted : March 22, 2009 10:12 am
dougtamjj
(@dougtamjj)
Expert

I grew up with the blue law and loved it. I loved going over to Grandma's house for Sunday dinner, playing soft ball with cousins and family friends. After I married and had children we had big neighborhood cook outs. When I was in my mid 20s they repealed the blue law in Virginia Beach, Va. and it seemed that someone always had to work. I imagine that the law was designed for Christians practicing their religion but for me it was family and friend day. Though I enjoyed a day that no one had to work I don't feel the govenment has the right to tell us that we cannot.

As far as drinking goes, there are still many places in the US that you cannot buy alcohol on Sundays or they are dry counties. People who live there just buy ahead of time.

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Posted : March 22, 2009 10:31 am
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert

arkansas has plenty of dry counties, where we lived you had to drive an hour to buy or you could belong to the one local establishment that sold a membership for 5 bucks a year and then you could buy only at that place.
our blue day, one time we went to tracys and a friend that was with us wanted a drink and they said no way as did the kmart and a couple of other places he tried.

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Posted : March 22, 2009 10:54 am
Linda J
(@Linda_J)
Expert

I grew up in Kentucky and almost all stores were closed on Sunday. My mother-in-law worked in retail and loved always being off on Sunday, even tho she wasn't particularly religious. Very few stores were open and we seemed to manange ok. Even now, most of the small shops in Chirstiansted are closed on Sunday, drives the tourists crazy. But here Sunday is a family day.

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Posted : March 22, 2009 11:32 am
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

aquaponics: I don't know how long you have been here, but the Good Friday restriction on selling drinks has always been enforced. In fact, the law reads "distilled liquors" but the enforcement in the past few years has been for any alcoholic beverage. I don't think that any establishment has wanted to take it to court, so bars and restaurants do follow whatever "they" say.

rotorhead: You need a chill pill.;)

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Posted : March 22, 2009 2:51 pm
rotorhead
(@rotorhead)
Trusted Member

East Ender, No Chill Pill needed. I just drink lots of Cruzan Rum. Especially on Sundays! The local Raëlian Church lets us drink during the service as long as we do it in moderation. BTW. the Elohim are coming, be careful what you say. 😛

Lizard, I would never presume to tell someone what they can or cannot post. I hope you feel the same way. Postings have no power of law. I was alluding to the blue laws being religion-based morality laws and should not be allowed to stand. Of course that is just my opinion and you should feel free to disagree. The "nones" is the fastest growing religious group in the US. Reason will prevail over superstition.

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Posted : March 22, 2009 5:46 pm
antiqueone
(@antiqueone)
Advanced Member

When you tell a child they MUST NOT do something, what is the one thing they absolutely feel they HAVE to do? The blue laws are antiquated, unhelpful and counter-productive. And why does government have to stick its nose in my business? And while we're at it, lets get rid of those silly seatbelt and cell phone while driving laws. Still, it would be nice to have a day (Sunday or Tuesday, I don't care) when nobody had to work (except essential workers like hospital workers, firefighters and the occasional police officer) . Maybe we could stop being "consumers" for a while and spend more time on things that matter.

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Posted : March 22, 2009 6:11 pm
dntw8up
(@dntw8up)
Trusted Member

I grew up in Philadelphia in the 1930s and 1940s. Movies were closed on Sundays, and so were nearly all shops. No baseball games (or any other professional sports) could be played on Sundays. Alcoholic beverages were sold only in "State Stores," and they were closed on Sundays and holidays.

It is still the case in PA that alcohol is sold only in State Stores, and beer in Beer Stores, and neither is sold on Sundays.

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Posted : March 22, 2009 6:58 pm
Exit Zero
(@exit-zero)
Trusted Member Registered

I know for many years no stores on Main St were open on Sundays - there was a Russian cruiseship with the hammer and sickle on the smokestack that would occasionally stop in STT but only on Sundays - the passengers would look in any of the windows that weren't shuttered but nothing was open except for the Magazine Store on Backstreet at Raadets Gade that sold Sunday papers, they would sell out of postcards, even with no stamps available - Havensite was still the warehouse district with nothing retail except for the Delly Deck.
It was a more peaceful time.

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Posted : March 22, 2009 10:37 pm
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