Changed minds?  

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Light
Posts: 42
(@Light)
Advanced Member
Joined: 3 years ago

Just curious about people that planned to move to the VI and if they changed their minds after Irma & Maria. It’s usually one of the first things that people bring up when you tell them you plan to move to the Caribbean are the storms.

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speee1dy
Posts: 8717
(@speee1dy)
Expert
Joined: 11 years ago

honestly, a lot of mainlanders left. and that was usually one of the first questions asked when you would finally see a friend after the storms. most people call this home and would leave .

lots of people left due to the hospital being condemned. health reasons and the children

we have actually been wanting to leave since before the hurricane.

i have to say, i never want to go through another hurricane like that again

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Light
Posts: 42
(@Light)
Advanced Member
Joined: 3 years ago

Yes, I noticed a lot of people I follow on social media left and some are going back!

It’s very sad what happened.
Why do you want to leave?

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singlefin
Posts: 852
(@singlefin)
Trusted Member
Joined: 5 years ago

8 years ago we began coming to St. Croix. I had been searching for a place to retire towards the end of a 30 year gig with a company I didn't particularly enjoy working for, in a place that never truly felt like home.
The more we came, the more people we met. As mentioned, hurricane season was a topic I often brought up as we considered the posibilties. I was surprised to find so many people living here that were here for Hugo.
Hurricane Hugo, for St. Croix, was the yardstick to measure all other storms against prior to Irma/Maria. Building codes were weeker, infrastructure was more delicate, far less assistance came from the states, recovery was at least 3x longer (we got power back in 3 months, after Hugo my neighborhood got power back in 9 months).
With so much suffering, what kept so many of them here? They stuck it out. They reinvested and rebuilt, and are still all around us. A neighbor across the road, who rode out Hugo 28 years ago, said he thought Maria was worse than Hugo, and yet he and his wife are going nowhere. He's repaired the one storm shutter that blew away and is still trimming trees around his yard.
My wife and I rode out Irma and Maria inside our home, and we were blessed the morning after with a solid roof and no major structural damage to our little home (which I now refer to as the bunker). We ran a generator a few hours a day, had a cistern full of water, found fuel, food, and ice like most others did. Once a routine was established, it wasn't so bad.
We had set up a flight to Arizona for the holidays to visit family before the hurricanes, and by late December we felt things were secure enough to leave for our planned two weeks away (electricity was restored 3 days before we left).
Our visit was nice. Electricity on demand, hot showers, smooth roads, and the limitless consumer options seemed to blow our minds.
Our flight home from Pheonix was delayed and we missed our connection in Miami. We were originally scheduled to arrive in STX around 9:30pm. Instead, our airline flew us to Puerto Rico where we had to wait for a Seabourne flight at 7:45am the next morning.
Sounds pretty crappy, and it definitely wasn't a fun evening, however as we began our decent into St. Croix, with the early morning sunlight passing between clouds it illuminated our beutiful green island surrounded by perfect shades of blue water. I looked at my wife with a smile. She smiled back.
I feel like we're those older residents now, hurricane survivors, rebuilders, here for the long haul. Still can't say why exactly, and this island definatly isn't for everyone, but if this little island gets under your skin, apparently you just can't walk away from it.
😉

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Scubadoo
Posts: 2234
(@Scubadoo)
Trusted Member
Joined: 5 years ago

Nicely put. We feel the same way each time the plane lands.

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