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alleybolen
(@alleybolen)
Advanced Member

can a fluffy dog, like a Chow, live on the island? just a question I'm pretty curious about.

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Topic starter Posted : October 10, 2007 12:16 pm
TxSissy
(@TxSissy)
Active Member

On STX certainly. However, you'll need to be aware of ticks. They're a problem on island from time to time. A while back I had a horrible infestation of ticks at my house and tried everything. Dip, tick collars, monthly drops, and having the yard professionally sprayed. Worked for a while but the ticks seemed to laugh at all these treatments. If you live in an area that's in close proximity to horses or cows, in my opinion, your possibility of problems with ticks might increase. Your chow might need to be shaved or professionally groomed to help prevent this problem.

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Posted : October 10, 2007 1:35 pm
stxem
(@stx-em)
Trusted Member

If you are bringing a chow from a northern climate, he might have some problems dealing with the heat year round. Most of the fluffy dogs I know on island are survive in the tropics but always have problems. They have to be kept indoors in cool temps and many seem to be pretty miserable in general. While they may be loved, their quality of life is severely diminished by not being able to run around in the yard, chase chickens, lay outside, and do what dogs like to do. Could you take them to the beach? Sure--but have fun with the grooming after a roll in the sand and dip in the salt water. Maybe there are more chows down here because they tend to be pretty lazy naturally and don't need alot of running around??
It may also depend on your dog--does he deal well with hot days up north? Or does he lie around and pant a lot? Also, whether it is a dark chow or light chow makes a difference--darker animals are less able to cope with heat. I would recommend talking to a vet about your particular animal and the shaving options. For some breeds, shaving alters their coat and may make it harder for them to naturally regulate their body temp. I always wanted a samoyed (white fluffy husky like dog) but it would not have a happy life in tropics. I have a small naturally fluffy crucian mix who is quite happy shaved and with a/c but utterly miserable if his hair gets too long.

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Posted : October 10, 2007 2:07 pm
Onika
(@Onika)
Trusted Member

One of our dogs is fluffy and was absolutely miserable for the first 3-6 months here. We only have fans--no a/c. She has adjusted but we also help her by having Debbie (of Debbie's Dedicated Dogs) shave her a few times a year.

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Posted : October 10, 2007 3:02 pm
The New Improved Jane
(@The_New_Improved_Jane)
Advanced Member

I had a pair of Samoyeds and I relocated them to California from the UK - I believe that it definitely shortened their life and reduced the quality thereof.
Hindsight - think why the 'fluffy' dogs have that coat and metabolism. Look at the sparse coats etc. of the hot climate breeds.
I made big mistake. Even shaved, their coat is still dense and traps heat in. IMHO

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Posted : October 10, 2007 3:25 pm
kat22
(@kat22)
Active Member

Is there a safe place you can keep your dog if there is a hurricane?

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Posted : October 12, 2007 1:11 am
Alexandra
(@Alexandra)
Trusted Member

kat22 - best bet is to bring them inside with your family and keep them calm. Many dogs hate storms and the noise and pressure changes and lightning/thunder that can go with them. They definitely shouldn't be out with flying debris and heavy rain and run-off that are likely to scare them and send them off in a panic to get into more trouble.

alleybolen - I've seen a bunch of chows on the island. Shade and lots of water would be a must.

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Posted : October 12, 2007 3:36 am
Trade
(@Trade)
Expert

Kat, mine stay with me huddled in my bathroom.

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Posted : October 12, 2007 10:45 am
Sabrina
(@Sabrina)
Advanced Member

I used to live in the islands, and I have fluffy husky-type dogs. Probably one of the biggest things that pushed me to leave, was the fact that it is a totally unsuitable environment for them.
The obvious problem is the heat. In the summertime you would definitely need 24hr a/c. The cost of electricity is very high, o.k. if money is no object.
The next, and I think the worst, is the number of parasites. The problem is so bad that unless you want to slowly kill your poor dog off by constantly giving it highly toxic "flea and tick" control products, you will have to spend several hours a week (preferably some time every day) playing "hunt the tick"! Good luck!
The other problem I worried about, although thankfully never encountered, was the number of Pitbulls in the islands. Dog-fighting is practiced in STT, and no secret is made of it. Don't get me started on this subject! If anyone doubts what I am saying, I will be happy to provide more information.
I'm not trying to put you off, but just be aware that it is not easy. If your dog is very small, and happy to run around in the house, you won't have as much to deal with.
I wish you all the best!

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Posted : October 30, 2007 12:35 am
alleybolen
(@alleybolen)
Advanced Member

I think I'm just gonna get a Rott, I'm in love with them. But dog fighting? That's crazy, and sad, please do explain

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Topic starter Posted : October 30, 2007 10:48 am
Sabrina
(@Sabrina)
Advanced Member

If you go to STT, check out the pet food supply shop just outside town. It is full of dog-fighting magazines etc, and the man working there readily admitted that they practice their fighting dogs on other breeds to give them an easy kill and therefore confidence. Obviously I managed to hide my total disgust in the interest of gathering information.
Don't know if he is still there - hopefully some Pitbull got him by the throat! The islands are small so it is very easy to find out what is going on.
In STX they definitely have cock-fighting. I didn't believe it, so someone proved it to me much to my horror. It seems like a pretty big event, and I saw many faces that I recognized there.(No, not friends!)
I could only wonder if all this is legal? If not, how come if I can find out about it, the authorities can't.
Sorry, now I'm really getting off the subject.

As for dogs, if you don't already have one , wait until you get there. The animal shelter usually has some absolutely gorgeous ones. Even some fluffy Chow-mix types that were born in the islands, and therefore much better adapted to the heat. It would also save you the trouble of transporting a dog to the island. I don't know if you already have accomodation, but if you don't, arriving without a dog would be a lot easier.

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Posted : October 31, 2007 3:08 am
Trade
(@Trade)
Expert

An Animal Cruelty Bill was passed by the legislature a year or 2 ago. Dog fighting is illegal but still happens. Drugs, murder & robbery are also illegal & still go on. If you see evidence of the fighting please call the police. PLEASE report it.

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Posted : October 31, 2007 8:30 am
Linda J
(@Linda_J)
Expert

There is dog fighting most everywhere in the states too. But it is in more remote areas and goes largely unnoticed, unless you are looking for it.

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Posted : October 31, 2007 9:23 am
alleybolen
(@alleybolen)
Advanced Member

the only way I will be getting to the islands soon is if I decide to go to college for marine biology. But as far as I know I'll be in Ohio for several more years at least. I have to get my rott soon because I guess they're trying to ban "mean" dogs like pitbulls and rotts 🙁

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Topic starter Posted : October 31, 2007 11:06 am
Becky R
(@Becky_R)
Trusted Member

Having had 5 Rotties on island - they really are not fond of the weather and I had more problems with their skin and constantly blowing their coats.

There are any number of Rotties on the island - and yes, they are used for protection and for fighting...it's not just the Pits. I was always very concerned that in spite of everything mine might be stolen from me and did not allow them in the yard unattended if I was not home.

You can visit the animal shelter and usually find some Rotties - some are not of good temperament, but some have just been dumped or left to fend for themselves and would make you a quality pet. Many could have intestinal parasites or heartworms - but the cost of transporting is getting on up there and treating for these maladies may run you the same as transporting. Please consider adopting a dog from one of the island shelters - the overpopulation is staggering...you'll be saving the life of an island dog who probably can withstand the temps better - I'm with some of the others, unless you are bringing a dog that is somewhat acclimated, like from southern Florida, they do seem to have a time adapting.

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Posted : October 31, 2007 11:50 am
Lizard
(@Lizard)
Trusted Member

Becky R,
You get a two thirds thanks! I tried your home remedy for hot spots on my dog, 1/2 original Listerine-1/2 water, in a spray bottle, sprayed several times a day. Didn't work. Didn't get the additional benefit of nice breath because the hot spot was on his back. Notice I said was. I was talking to one of the guy's that work the dock's at Gallows bay, he said he puts 4W oil on his dogs hot spots and it clears it up. I didn't do motor oil. However I mixed 1/3 baby oil-1/3 Listerine-1/3 water sprayed according to your directions and the hot spot cleared up in three day's.
So you get a 2/3rd thanks and I'll keep the other third. Thanks!

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Posted : October 31, 2007 12:53 pm
Becky R
(@Becky_R)
Trusted Member

Well, there's a new one for ya...glad you found a solution.

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Posted : October 31, 2007 1:08 pm
blukisses
(@blukisses)
Advanced Member

yes they can i have a full breed chow and she does great but shes inside.. which is sometimes hotter than outside.

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Posted : November 1, 2007 5:38 pm
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