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I want to be where there are more people who look like me 😉

 
michaelcarter2009
(@michaelcarter2009)
Active Member

Hi, I'm a AA form FL but originally form Baltimore, MD I am strongly considering moving to the VI but not sure how I could survive and live there. What kind of college degrees people have there, or what kind of work gives a person a affordable pay?

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Topic starter Posted : October 28, 2008 2:05 pm
Trade
(@Trade)
Expert

What kind of work do you do?

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Posted : October 28, 2008 2:22 pm
michaelcarter2009
(@michaelcarter2009)
Active Member

Just about everything. I was a surgical tech in the Navy, I've done construction, sales etc. I have an AS in real estate and a BS in workforce education.

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Topic starter Posted : October 28, 2008 2:36 pm
morna
(@morna)
Advanced Member

Hi Michael.

Have you gone to the islands to check them out? I highly suggest a visit, or a PMV, before you decide. Not to put negativity out there but I know a few stateside AA's that have had a hard time fitting in. Just because you're the same complexion doesn't mean that you'll be accepted so easily. Just FYI. 😉

PS-I grew up in Laurel. 🙂

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Posted : October 28, 2008 3:55 pm
jewelygirl
(@jewelygirl)
Advanced Member

I agree with Morna - I'm in Solomon's Island, MD

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Posted : October 28, 2008 5:04 pm
GoodToGo
(@GoodToGo)
Trusted Member

I suspect one of the things you will find is that you have MORE in common with people from the mainland of ANY color than you will have in common with the native population. I'm by no means saying you can't get along with and make some native friends - just that the mainland culture tends to outweigh any racial experience in my limited experience (I am a data point of one after all.)

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Posted : October 28, 2008 10:10 pm
A Davis
(@A_Davis)
Trusted Member

It'll be a great learning experience, but culturally and socially, the people of the Caribbean in general tend to have little in common with African Americans except for the different shades of brown that they're wrapped in.

Like anywhere else, having a degree is not necessary in every situation, and experience, reliability and getting along will go a very long way. People tend to be paid lower here than for similar positions stateside. This is true of entry level to middle management positions.

Find your own way, but respect for different ways of living and being are the first steps to feeling at home in any place on the planet. Hope you enjoy your visit or your stay!

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Posted : October 29, 2008 12:54 am
speee1dy
(@speee1dy)
Expert

i lived in waldorf for about 15 years. i still miss it

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Posted : October 29, 2008 11:09 am
Betty
(@Betty)
Trusted Member

No matter you skin color it usualy takes a while to get accepted by the locals and even then there's kind of a limit. That being said there are some people that just fit in perfectly to the local culture. No guarantees.

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Posted : October 29, 2008 1:31 pm
maryc
(@maryc)
Active Member

michael,
not sure i follow your statement,if u want to be where people look like u then USVI might not be for u there r plenty of white people.if thats who ur trying to avoid then ur probably better of somewhere like trinidad and tabogo or maybe even vanuato i dont think there are to many of THEM there : )

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Posted : October 29, 2008 11:05 pm
stiphy
(@stiphy)
Trusted Member

LOL grew up in Greenbelt, thought my name was "White Boy" until I left PG county. Honestly, one of the most interesting eye opener's is that skin color goes out the window when culture is so different. I think that often black people from the states have more in common with white people from the states than they do with black people from the Caribbean. It shows what BS skin color is in terms of making judgements about someone, which is a good life lesson to learn no matter what color your skin is. Not saying you won't make friends with native born VI'ers, just saying that off the bat there are likely more commonalities with a white person who grew up in MD then there are with someone who grew up on an island and maybe has never left it.

You should defintiely visit, and not just do the tourist thing before you decide to move down here. Wanting to move somewhere because people "look like you" is not a good reason to move to St. Croix, and its kind of racist. I'm not trying to be accusational but think about it a bit. That said, if you come down drop me a line, you can never have enough folks from MD on island!

Sean

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Posted : October 30, 2008 6:57 am
Sabrina
(@Sabrina)
Advanced Member

Michael, culture is something that goes very deep - I think it overrides the colour of your skin, or the language that you speak. It doesn't mean that you can't get along with people of different cultures, just don't expect them to think the same way you do. In my case, I find that I have more in common with other Europeans, even though we all speak different languages, than I do with another white person not from Europe. Black people from islands with a heavy European influence seem to have a more similar upbringing (parents and schools are very strict compared with USA) Manners are extremely important to us. Don't get me wrong, I have some very good American friends, but we just understand that we think differently about certain things. Our not PC conversations are a great source of entertainment! I think you believe skin colour is too important. I don't know if that is a result of where you were raised, but please try to get over it. If everyone holds on to those feelings, things will never get better.

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Posted : October 30, 2008 3:09 pm
michaelcarter2009
(@michaelcarter2009)
Active Member

OK you guys are right color is the most important reasons for making such a move to the VI, however, at least i wouldn't get pulled over because I'm driving a nice car or followed around in the store because they think I'm going to steal something. Come on this isn't the only site I have observed and most agree with me life would probably be better for me there then being constanly reminded of the color of my skin. not to mention now that we have a black man running for president you can cut the racial tension with a knife here. Oh and by the way I'm living in Florida now which is very racist. i don't know how else you think I would see things growing up in the US. I am no way near a racist some of my best friends are Hispanic and white. Its just that i get tired of the innuendos and sutle racism. And if the pay insnt so great what kind of work do all you guys do there?

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Topic starter Posted : October 31, 2008 12:24 pm
Betty
(@Betty)
Trusted Member

If you drive around in a nice car here you're making yourself a target for crime. It may be a tropical island but it doesnt mean our crime isnt bad. Based on pop its way worse the florida.

From the things you said you need to come for a pmv before you try moving to any island. There is definitely racism here as well.

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Posted : October 31, 2008 12:55 pm
GoodToGo
(@GoodToGo)
Trusted Member

Ah, Florida. As it happens I spent much of the prior day or so in Miami and couldn't agree with you more. I thought the whole area had a palpable divisiveness I haven't frankly seen anywhere in many years of travel. It was punctuated by a slew of the nastiest set of local political campaign commercials I've ever seen anywhere. I think if the rest of the country saw those they would be shocked (makes Chicago politics look clean by comparison and I've never seen so much mud slinging by and against minority, mostly Hispanic, candidates.)

Depending on your definition of nice car you may or may not have issues here but they won't be because of your race. There are nice cars here much to my surprise. There are some Japanese and domestic luxury dealers on the island but no European luxury brands. Despite that I'm always surprised to see late model Mercedes and especially BMW cars driving around (even a few late model Volvos.) I haven't been here long enough to know if people driving these cars are vicitmized often or not but I'm sure someone here can chime in with an informed perspective (as it happens one of our European cars just arrived from the U.S. and I need to go pick it up today or Monday if I find time.)

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Posted : October 31, 2008 1:45 pm
michaelcarter2009
(@michaelcarter2009)
Active Member

FYI I was talking about the cops pulling my over for driving a nice car. are you even black? becuz you missed waht I was saying by a mile.

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Topic starter Posted : October 31, 2008 1:53 pm
rokipatel
(@rokipatel)
Advanced Member

In my case being an Islander myself from Puerto rico has really help me to fit in and get things done in the islands. Islanders don't look at puertoricans like mainlander so i am not having that problem. Even physically i am white with light brown hair sometimes i could pass like a gringo but as soon i open my mouth and the hear my accent they ask me are you puertorican. So my in my case it's not a problem.

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Posted : October 31, 2008 2:30 pm
Sabrina
(@Sabrina)
Advanced Member

Where were you in Florida? Most of the cops in Miami are Black or Hispanic.

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Posted : October 31, 2008 2:35 pm
michaelcarter2009
(@michaelcarter2009)
Active Member

jacksonville

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Topic starter Posted : October 31, 2008 2:43 pm
Alix
 Alix
(@Alix)
Advanced Member

You wouldn't get pulled over for "driving while black" here.....hell, you can drive with an open beer in your hand! (SERIOUSLY) I got your points that you are worried about....I'm not going to say that the same things don't exist here, but, it is a little rarer....you would have to really "look the part" to put anyone's back up....... but, I still don't know about the nice car thing....I wouldn't have a nice car here to save my life!

You would be accepted as long as you respect the local customs, traditions, holidays, and DIFFERENCES. I have made many nice island friends. It takes them a long time to become trusting, but, when you find the friendship, believe me, it is worth the wait.

The islanders are more reserved than the mainlanders. Take your time, get to know people....we all fit in here...I always say that we are all misfits on this island...and we are all either running from something, or running to something. I ran TO something, and I couldn't be happier. I want to live here for the rest of my life. Come down, check it out....meet all of these wonderful people on this board. It is a wealth of information before making the move here. I couldn't have done it without this site.....and to you all, I thank you!

We look forward to meeting you!

Alix

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Posted : October 31, 2008 3:47 pm
Sabrina
(@Sabrina)
Advanced Member

OK Michael, I think I understand - I have heard some very bad things about North Florida when it comes to racism. I'm sorry that you have had to go through that, but please don't think all white people are the same.

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Posted : October 31, 2008 4:18 pm
Alix
 Alix
(@Alix)
Advanced Member

'cause we aren't......by a LONG shot.......

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Posted : October 31, 2008 4:21 pm
mnjj
 mnjj
(@mnjj)
Advanced Member

It is all going to boil down to your attitude. If you have a laid back attitude and don't get angry very easily about things not going your way, quickly . . . then, slow down a bit more, relax, and then you will begin to understand the way of life of STX. I haven't had a chance to experience STT or STJ, but I can speak of STX. It is a WONDERFUL place! But, I am a very relaxed person that doesn't let much "ruffle my feathers". I am a professional, black woman born in Mississippi and currently living in Georgia. Both states are very southern and very racist. The big difference in is that in one state the people who don't like you because of your skin color will let you know, the other state, they will smile with you and hate you at the same time.

That being said, I have never experienced any ill will on STX. I have friends who live there that I visit every year. I don't stay in a fancy hotel or do a lot of eating out. Staying there I learned to turn off the water in the bathroom while brushing my teeth and how to run the water in the shower to wet my body, turn the water off to soap up, and then turn it back on to rinse off. I have stood in line at Cost U Less and picked mango off the tree in the backyard to have for breakfast. Things are different, but in a great way for those who can adapt.

This board is a geat source of general information, but for personal specifics, you have to visit. You have to go down and experience things for yourself. What works for me may or may not work for you. My friends have "nice things" and I have never heard of them experiencing any crime. Always remain alert and aware of your surroundings.

Hopefully you can visit and experience things for yourself. If nothing else, you will educate yourself of all of the things that you are asking about and that will allow you to form your own opinions of America's Paradise.

MJ

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Posted : November 2, 2008 1:25 pm
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