Living in St. John ...
 

Living in St. John for the summer  


ashleyyy_333
Posts: 2
(@ashleyyy_333)
New Member
Joined: 4 months ago

I am in college and really want to live in St. John over the summer and work all summer there. I just want to get away from everything at home and clear my head before having to start working full time next year. Is this reasonable? or would it be way too difficult? does anywhere hire for just the summer months? 

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ashleyyy_333
Posts: 2
(@ashleyyy_333)
New Member
Joined: 4 months ago

just want to clarify - I am not some crazy college student looking to party all summer. St. John is somewhere that has always made me happy and I just want a summer to get away, relax, and do something on my own

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Afriend
Posts: 482
(@afriend)
Advanced Member
Joined: 13 years ago

Summer is Low Season in the Caribbean so tourism is “down” making it more difficult to find short term work.   FYI - Even in the best of times it is difficult to find a well paying permanent full- time position so finding a job just for the summer will be a bit of a challenge, finding one that pays well enough to cover your living expenses (which are very high on St. John) is even more challenging.

You’ll also need to come with a bit of a nest egg  - enough money to cover expenses (rent, food, utilities, etc.) until you find gainful employment.

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fdr
Posts: 1243
 fdr
(@fdr)
Trusted Member
Joined: 11 years ago

Good day ashleyyy_333,

Is it possible? Yes. Will it be the relaxing getaway that you envision? If money is not a concern to you, it can be. If you do not have plenty set aside for this "summer off", you may spend a great deal of time working to pay your way, which leads to a lot less relaxing.

If you live in NYC or the SF Bay area, your housing costs may be comparable to ours. Otherwise, you will find the cost of housing here much higher than what is available in your area.

If you don't have access to a car, that will also limit where you can live, since you'll have to rely on walking, hitchhiking, and/or the bus, which has limited service, for your transportation. And of course, the more easily accessible places charge higher rent.

A few more places have opened up recently, but we remain in a major housing crunch. There is not much housing available, and you will likely find most of what is available to be either unaffordable or undesirable. Many locals and longtime residents are struggling to find a place. You might find few affordable rentals available without a year lease, although you could luck into a sublet. Much depends on timing and serendipity.

You could likely find some restaurant or gift shop work as seasonal employee turnover begins. Come August, many establishments close down entirely, and the places that stay open are not very busy. By which I mean, you could work an entire shift and earn $30 or less. Expect to work a couple of jobs to make ends meet.

Also, hurricane season begins June 1. In recent years, we have had to prepare for tropical storms and hurricanes beginning in early July. You will need a realistic plan for handling a major storm, including adequate food, drinking water, and cash for at least two weeks, as well as a safe place to stay during the event. Do not count on being able to evacuate ahead of time. 

With all of that said, if you are well funded, a summer adventure here is doable. You'd need to come with a round-trip plane ticket, a week's stay at a conveniently located short-term rental (about $1,000), enough money for first/last/security deposit (unless you find a roommate, figure on at least $3,600 for a studio apartment), and at minimum a few hundred bucks to get you through your first week -- keeping in mind it'll go faster than you think. That adds up to at least $5,500. If that cost sounds steep, you may find more relaxation elsewhere.

Good luck, and let us know what you decide!

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1 Reply
ohjbo
(@ohjbo)
Joined: 4 months ago

New Member
Posts: 1
Posted by: fdr

Good day ashleyyy_333,

Is it possible? Yes. Will it be the relaxing getaway that you envision? If money is not a concern to you, it can be. If you do not have plenty set aside for this "summer off", you may spend a great deal of time working to pay your way, which leads to a lot less relaxing.

If you live in NYC or the SF Bay area, your housing costs may be comparable to ours. Otherwise, you will find the cost of housing here much higher than what is available in your area.

If you don't have access to a car, that will also limit where you can live, since you'll have to rely on walking, hitchhiking, and/or the bus, which has limited service, for your transportation. And of course, the more easily accessible places charge higher rent.

A few more places have opened up recently, but we remain in a major housing crunch. There is not much housing available, and you will likely find most of what is available to be either unaffordable or undesirable. Many locals and longtime residents are struggling to find a place. You might find few affordable rentals available without a year lease, although you could luck into a sublet. Much depends on timing and serendipity.

You could likely find some restaurant or gift shop work as seasonal employee turnover begins. Come August, many establishments close down entirely, and the places that stay open are not very busy. By which I mean, you could work an entire shift and earn $30 or less. Expect to work a couple of jobs to make ends meet.

Also, hurricane season begins June 1. In recent years, we have had to prepare for tropical storms and hurricanes beginning in early July. You will need a realistic plan for handling a major storm, including adequate food, drinking water, and cash for at least two weeks, as well as a safe place to stay during the event. Do not count on being able to evacuate ahead of time. 

With all of that said, if you are well funded, a summer adventure here is doable. You'd need to come with a round-trip plane ticket, a week's stay at a conveniently located short-term rental (about $1,000), enough money for first/last/security deposit (unless you find a roommate, figure on at least $3,600 for a studio apartment), and at minimum a few hundred bucks to get you through your first week -- keeping in mind it'll go faster than you think. That adds up to at least $5,500. If that cost sounds steep, you may find more relaxation elsewhere.

Good luck, and let us know what you decide!

Thanks for this breakdown! Very useful. My partner and I are looking to move in July (have already found work) and this gives us a great guideline of what we'll need while we find more long term housing. Thank you!

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