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Looking to Move Permanently When We Retire

 
Techbookwriter
(@Techbookwriter)
New Member

Probably straightforward questions you've heard many times... we're really serious about retiring permanently to USVI. What are the implications for things like social security, Medicare. etc? Do we need any sort of permanent visa? Those types of things. Sorry that these are pretty pedestrian, but we're just starting the process. Love the USVI.

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Topic starter Posted : November 14, 2016 2:39 am
Alana33
(@alana33)
Expert

The USVI is a U.S. territory.
No visas or passports required.
Social security, Medicare are as in the USA mainland.
However, individual health insurance is not available here unless you work for the VI Government or a company that provides it.
Majority of people often go stateside for medical treatment, if they can afford to.

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Posted : November 14, 2016 4:03 am
Exit Zero
(@exit-zero)
Trusted Member Registered

Lots of very useful and pertinent advice in the drop down menus in the header above.

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Posted : November 14, 2016 4:16 am
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

Medicare isn't exactly like in Big America. There are no Advantage plans. As far as I know, the only way to get Medigap is through AARP (UHC). I think they are working on part D insurance, but I don't think they have it now.

If you are a US citizen, you don't need anything to move here. You'll get your Social Security, etc.

Just so you know: Residents of territories are not eligible to vote in presidential elections. Sometimes makes things easier. 😉

Health care can be a problem. If you have any chronic diseases, make sure they can be managed here. On St Thomas, for example, there is one endocrinologist, one cardiologist, one dermatologist. There is no rheumatologist.

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Posted : November 15, 2016 8:52 pm
Gator's Mom
(@gators_mom)
Trusted Member

AARP UHC Medicare supplement plans are available at a reasonable price (@$145 per month for plan F) as is one pricey AARP UHC part D plan that costs $41 per month PLUS $400 deductible.

2017 prices.

Medicare isn't exactly like in Big America. There are no Advantage plans. As far as I know, the only way to get Medigap is through AARP (UHC). I think they are working on part D insurance, but I don't think they have it now.

If you are a US citizen, you don't need anything to move here. You'll get your Social Security, etc.

Just so you know: Residents of territories are not eligible to vote in presidential elections. Sometimes makes things easier. 😉

Health care can be a problem. If you have any chronic diseases, make sure they can be managed here. On St Thomas, for example, there is one endocrinologist, one cardiologist, one dermatologist. There is no rheumatologist.

ReplyQuote
Posted : November 15, 2016 9:20 pm
Afriend
(@afriend)
Trusted Member

Seriously consider purchasing Medical Evacuation Insurance. If you come down with a serious medical condition or have some type of major trauma you'll probably want to be flown back to a major hospital on the mainland and that can be cost prohibitive without insurance.

For what it is worth, we go back to the mainland twice a year for our semi-annual medical checkups and for all but routine and minor health issues. For anything serious we get off island as quickly as possible.

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Posted : November 15, 2016 9:29 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

Medical evacuation insurance is a good idea, but there are limitations. They typically will send you from a hospital to another hospital only if the service is not available where you are. They will not send you for a lower level of care. Read the small print carefully.

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Posted : November 15, 2016 11:53 pm
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