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sallyf
(@sallyf)
Advanced Member

http://stcroixsource.com/content/news/local-news/2011/07/02/study-finds-higher-mortality-vi-hospitals

Brief gist of this study - mortality rate for pneumonia, heart attack and heart failure are all substantially higher in the U.S. territories than stateside.
It might be a good idea for any people hoping to move down (especially those included in an "at-risk" population group for any of the conditions above) to check out this study. None of us want to think about being seriously ill when we are thinking of relocating to a tropical island, but it is a grim reality of life. The USVI are small and remote and there has been some funding and management...er...issues.
Moral: don't get scared, but be prepared!!!

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Topic starter Posted : July 3, 2011 4:19 am
Neil
 Neil
(@Neil)
Trusted Member

I didn't see that they corrected for race. African Americans have higher heart disease rates and they account for 80% of the population here.

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Posted : July 3, 2011 6:40 pm
DonExodus
(@DonExodus)
Advanced Member

I didn't see that they corrected for race. African Americans have higher heart disease rates and they account for 80% of the population here.

Thumbs way up. Reading scientific literature if not properly trained can lead to a lot of ill-informed hype. Regardless, the BLS for MI stroke etc is the same here as stateside, and the first responders really make the difference.

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Posted : July 4, 2011 2:50 am
onthespot
(@onthespot)
Advanced Member

so does seeking help when you first think you might need it, instead of at death's door.

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Posted : July 4, 2011 4:27 am
sallyf
(@sallyf)
Advanced Member

I can read and I am scientifically trained. This article is NOT about the percentage of the population that has such diseases...it is specifically about the mortality rate among those who are admitted to the hospital for pneumonia etc...

"For every 100 patients admitted for these problems in the territories and stateside, you will have two more people who die of heart attacks in the territories; three more die from pneumonia and one more of heart failure. Those are really high numbers."

This is a discussion about outcomes after admission...nothing more, nothing less. It is not about 'skewing' for race or population disease incidence. This is a problem with the survival rate after hospitalization for these events.

Sheesh, Don...perhaps you might like to tuck those thumbs in a bit!!!.

On the Spot has a point - early treatment saves lives and improves mortality rate...so perhaps we need to look at the primary care and/or education to reduce these figures.

Again, I reiterate...don't get scared, be prepared.

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Topic starter Posted : July 4, 2011 6:41 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

sally: I think you do have to be careful in interpreting this data. I believe you would be jumping to conclusions thinking either that it is the fault of the hospitals or that it is the fault of the "system." If you have "heart attack" (which I would assume is myocardial infarction, but they could be talking cardiac arrest) and have co-morbidities, your risk of death is higher. If you delay seeking medical attention, your risk of death is higher. The raw numbers are interesting, but should be scrutinized.

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Posted : July 4, 2011 7:46 pm
poorthang
(@poorthang)
Advanced Member

I believe half of the doctors will kill you and half will help you....my point is you get treatment based on WHO you get as a doctor.That is a FACT.

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Posted : July 5, 2011 2:14 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

poorthang: Well, half of the doctors out there graduated in the lower 50% of their class!;)

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Posted : July 5, 2011 7:39 pm
Exit Zero
(@exit-zero)
Trusted Member Registered

The person who graduated last in their class at Med School is still addressed as " Doctor *** "

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Posted : July 5, 2011 9:26 pm
poorthang
(@poorthang)
Advanced Member

Doctor is the professional title you get for passing.......applying knowledge and skill to treat someone is a whole different ballgame! FACT:-o

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Posted : July 5, 2011 9:44 pm
southernsweetie
(@southernsweetie)
Advanced Member

So how are the medical staff on the islands?

Are there Drs of all specialties (pediatrician, GP, ob/gyn, endo, ortho, dentists, etc

Is it easy to get non emergency appointments?
Same day sick visits?

Are there urgent care facilities? (peds and adult)

How long is a typical wait at an ER?

Are there pharmacies on each island? any 24 hour ones?

Are OTC items readily available (aspirin, Advil, Pepto, Zyrtec, etc.)?

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Posted : July 12, 2011 8:21 am
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