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Nursing Jobs, moving advice for small family...

(@BellaLuna)
Posts: 7
Active Member
Topic starter
 

Hello all. My husband and I have been considering a move to the VI for years and now that I am close to finishing school we are becoming more serious about it. I am currently a Licensed Practical Nurse, but I will be finishing my RN degree in about 6 months. I was wondering if I will have any luck applying for positions when we come down. Do the local hospitals/physicians show preference for hiring locals? My husband is employed as a night auditor in a local hotel, so I know he should be able to find a position in one of the hotels, but I doubt he will be able make enough to support us for very long. We have some savings to get by on when we first move. We have two children, so we will not be making any rash decisions. We will consider all options. Thanks for your help!!

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 7:06 am
(@speee1dy)
Posts: 8871
Illustrious Member
 

first, read the board and all posts related to education crime cost of living jobs and the hospital, then make a PMV-pre move visit. only st thomas and st croix have hospitals.
after you do all of your reading, come back and ask questions.

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 12:17 pm
 lc98
(@lc98)
Posts: 1250
Noble Member
 

speee1dy's advice is excellent. The hospitals recently have had to cut staff due to budget reductions. Search "hospital" in the archives (make sure to set your search range to "all", as it defaults to last 30 days) to get a good picture of the hiring situation as well as working conditions for nurses.

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 1:02 pm
(@STXBob)
Posts: 2138
Noble Member
 

If your children are school-aged, you will probably want to put them in a private school, which is expensive.

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 2:55 pm
(@the-oldtart)
Posts: 6523
Illustrious Member
 

If your children are school-aged, you will probably want to put them in a private school, which is expensive.

That was my gut reaction. It's hard enough if you don't have children but the cost of education is a real killer for most. A lot of newbies and residents leave for the States when their children reach school-age.

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 2:59 pm
(@sheiba)
Posts: 483
Reputable Member
 

The school situation is tough. I believe if more state siders would put their kids in the public schools and get involved, the public schools could improve. Lets encourage families to move here, please.

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 5:27 pm
(@the-oldtart)
Posts: 6523
Illustrious Member
 

The school situation is tough. I believe if more state siders would put their kids in the public schools and get involved, the public schools could improve. Lets encourage families to move here, please.

Nobody is discouraging anyone from moving here, only pointing out the reality of living here. Diminishing standards of education are of grave concern throughout the US and have been for a couple of decades with precious little positive end in sight both there and here. Encouraging "statesiders" to set an example by becoming involved in the public schools into which they enroll their children is no real solution at all. Encouraging locals and long time residents to become more involved has been addressed and continues to be addressed.

As many totally dedicated public school teachers there are here who work tirelessly to overcome the odds and as many children educated in the local schools do graduate and go on to higher learning institutions and become stalwart members of society, there's no dispute that children enrolled in private schools have a substantial educational advantage. But it comes at a price and is something which any prospective transplant needs to be very much aware of as that, combined with the very high COL here can be quite an eye opener.

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 7:03 pm
(@sheiba)
Posts: 483
Reputable Member
 

The school situation is tough. I believe if more state siders would put their kids in the public schools and get involved, the public schools could improve. Lets encourage families to move here, please.

Nobody is discouraging anyone from moving here, only pointing out the reality of living here. Diminishing standards of education are of grave concern throughout the US and have been for a couple of decades with precious little positive end in sight both there and here. Encouraging "statesiders" to set an example by becoming involved in the public schools into which they enroll their children is no real solution at all. Encouraging locals and long time residents to become more involved has been addressed and continues to be addressed.

As many totally dedicated public school teachers there are here who work tirelessly to overcome the odds and as many children educated in the local schools do graduate and go on to higher learning institutions and become stalwart members of society, there's no dispute that children enrolled in private schools have a substantial educational advantage. But it comes at a price and is something which any prospective transplant needs to be very much aware of as that, combined with the very high COL here can be quite an eye opener.

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 7:41 pm
(@sheiba)
Posts: 483
Reputable Member
 

OOps! not sure what happened to my reply. anyway...
Im not suggesting statesiders serve as "examples". Im suggesting they get involved, create more diversity and improve the public schools by working together.

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 7:53 pm
(@speee1dy)
Posts: 8871
Illustrious Member
 

that would be great, but it is a part of the government who thinks nothing of spending money needlessly. it is great to be involved as a parent, but here it takes more than that. it was just a couple of years ago some of the schools became accredited

 
Posted : June 15, 2012 9:13 pm
(@blu4u)
Posts: 842
Prominent Member
 

The school situation is tough. I believe if more state siders would put their kids in the public schools and get involved, the public schools could improve. Lets encourage families to move here, please.

Nobody is discouraging anyone from moving here, only pointing out the reality of living here. Diminishing standards of education are of grave concern throughout the US and have been for a couple of decades with precious little positive end in sight both there and here. Encouraging "statesiders" to set an example by becoming involved in the public schools into which they enroll their children is no real solution at all. Encouraging locals and long time residents to become more involved has been addressed and continues to be addressed.

As many totally dedicated public school teachers there are here who work tirelessly to overcome the odds and as many children educated in the local schools do graduate and go on to higher learning institutions and become stalwart members of society, there's no dispute that children enrolled in private schools have a substantial educational advantage. But it comes at a price and is something which any prospective transplant needs to be very much aware of as that, combined with the very high COL here can be quite an eye opener.

The advantage may have more to do with the demographic of the parents than the "private school". Seiba makes an excellent point. Look at the success of charter schools.

 
Posted : June 16, 2012 2:15 am
Exit Zero
(@exit-zero)
Posts: 2460
Famed Member
 

The proven success of the education at Charter schools and private schools does not only depend on the 'demographic' of the parents - they only function better, primarily with the dedicated involvement level of the parents. If you expect the school to be a babysitting service for 12 years and don't participate in your childs education on any parental level, PTA, sports, volunteer, attendance at school functions, homework supervision, etc. even an expensive private school will be less succesful at educating your child.

 
Posted : June 16, 2012 6:18 am
(@Angela)
Posts: 53
Trusted Member
 

Exactly, Exit Zero. Just look at the success of the charter schools created in disadvantaged areas. Most of their pupils come from poor, single family homes, yet they do a terrific job. Is this the "demographic" previously referred to?

Blu4u: Your constant sniping at any/all remarks made by Tart is getting really old. It's so predictable it's almost funny, if it weren't so annoying.

 
Posted : June 16, 2012 11:38 am
(@blu4u)
Posts: 842
Prominent Member
 

Exactly, Exit Zero. Just look at the success of the charter schools created in disadvantaged areas. Most of their pupils come from poor, single family homes, yet they do a terrific job. Is this the "demographic" previously referred to?

Good question Angela. The "demographic" stretches beyond simple categories like race and gross annual income. Parental motivation to arrange the best educational environment requires a more subjective analysis, especially in USVI.

For example, many of successful private schools offer financial aid. Many middle income parents make tremendous financial scarifies to send their children to private schools. Many low income / savvy parents utilize every available resource (academic, connections. athletics, arts) to position their children for scholarships. The parents making the most sacrifices are usually the same parents attending and organizing all the school related events.

The founding principle behind Charter Schools is to provide a vehicle for families to improve the quality of public education by breaking away form large "politically heavy" districts. And charter schools aren't just successful in low income neighborhoods or populated by only low income students. Nor, are all charter schools organized as education for "poor, single family homes". The idea of charter schools and magenet schools is to serve the specific needs of a particular community of students, regardless of income or number of parents living in the home.

Shieba's correct. Diversity (in all shapes and sizes) is a good thing for schools. Angela, volunteering time and or funds to a local school (private or public) is great way to effect a positive and productive contribution to the community at large. And it's fun too!

 
Posted : June 16, 2012 4:40 pm
(@blu4u)
Posts: 842
Prominent Member
 

The proven success of the education at Charter schools and private schools does not only depend on the 'demographic' of the parents - they only function better, primarily with the dedicated involvement level of the parents. If you expect the school to be a babysitting service for 12 years and don't participate in your child's education on any parental level, PTA, sports, volunteer, attendance at school functions, homework supervision, etc. even an expensive private school will be less successful at educating your child.

Good point. That's why so many of the private schools offer financial aid to encourage involvement from a population of highly motivated families. (i.e. demographic of the parents v. price tag of tution) Learning to play the hand you're dealt is important aspect of school.

 
Posted : June 16, 2012 4:48 pm
(@Angela)
Posts: 53
Trusted Member
 

Why do I feel like I'm being lectured to? The long sermon you write is all information known to anyone with half a brain. Nothing new or radical in what you're pontificating. We knew all that long ago. Did you just figure it out?

 
Posted : June 16, 2012 6:18 pm
(@blu4u)
Posts: 842
Prominent Member
 

Why do I feel like I'm being lectured to? The long sermon you write is all information known to anyone with half a brain. Nothing new or radical in what you're pontificating. We knew all that long ago. Did you just figure it out?

No--you, Angela, did ask question about demographics. I did my best to provide a full and honest answer. Sorry if the content of my forthcoming reply or the basis of my opinion offended you. In the future I'll simply ignore your requests for information, no problem.

 
Posted : June 16, 2012 6:49 pm
(@sheiba)
Posts: 483
Reputable Member
 

This board tends to focus on negative aspects of island life.
I love living in the VI. I think if I would have come to this board for advice prior to moving here, I may have thought twice. So glad I didn't.

 
Posted : June 16, 2012 10:53 pm
(@the-oldtart)
Posts: 6523
Illustrious Member
 

This board tends to focus on negative aspects of island life.
I love living in the VI. I think if I would have come to this board for advice prior to moving here, I may have thought twice. So glad I didn't.

I think I'm confused. On May 5 you said:

"Education on the island, my number one challenge living here. The public schools are about as bad as you can imagine. Much of it has to do with the culture. Education not exactly a priority for many, yelling and hitting by teachers acceptable. And to top it off, the schools are over crowded and under funded."

I'm not disagreeing with you but surely that's a negative - or is it realistic?

You moved here about six months ago and aren't you now planning to leave? :S

 
Posted : June 17, 2012 12:35 am
(@sheiba)
Posts: 483
Reputable Member
 

OT,Who said I moved here 6 months ago and who said I was leaving?

Bellaluna, cant answer your hospital question.good luck with your decision making.this is a beautiful, fantastic place to call home, and like anywwhere..you will be faced with unique moving and living challenges.

 
Posted : June 17, 2012 7:49 am
(@the-oldtart)
Posts: 6523
Illustrious Member
 

OT,Who said I moved here 6 months ago and who said I was leaving?

I believe you did. I did say "about" six months ago based on your Feb 6 and Feb 17 postings this year when you mentioned respectively, "we are new to the island", and "moved to St Croix a few months ago", while on May 8 in advertising a vehicle for sale you said, "leaving island soon".

 
Posted : June 17, 2012 11:21 am
(@BellaLuna)
Posts: 7
Active Member
Topic starter
 

Speedy, I already have done the research you mentioned. Why did you assume I did not. For those of you concerned for my children's education, my husband and I have been pretty successful at working different shifts to avoid child care. My plan is to homeschool/ online at first until we settle and deside what is right for us. I have tried researching the hospital situation myself. If you look at the websites for both the St. Croix and St. Thomas hospitals, they both say they have open positions. That is why I came her to ask for help, getting a local opinion. When we get closer to moving, we will do a PMV, but right now we are using our vacationing experiences as our basis, so there are things we need to ask. I do not mean to be rude, but I thought this site was for assistance, not lecturing? If someone comes here for advice try not to assume they are an ignorant idiot incapable of thinking things through. If the VI is so bad, then why do you all live there? I wish everyone the best, have a great day!

 
Posted : July 5, 2012 10:31 am
(@speee1dy)
Posts: 8871
Illustrious Member
 

I did give advise, most people who come here do not bother to read any of the old posts, which is really key in narrowing down your questions and will also better help us answer those questions that you still have. i was not snippy to you and i was not lecturing. i was giving sound solid advise. if you found that offensive i do apologize.
most people who want to move to the vi wear rose colored glasses, they do not understand the day to day life of living in "paradise". we are not negative so much as realists where the vi is concerned. people do not understand until they actually live here. I would think that people who are thinking about moving here would want to know all the good, bad and ugly about living in the vi.
if you want to be an rn, you might want to consider a travel position as i hear they pay much more and during that time you can decide if this is actually a place you want to live.
i might also suggest lightening up a bit
good luck to you

 
Posted : July 5, 2012 12:57 pm
(@BellaLuna)
Posts: 7
Active Member
Topic starter
 

My only problem really is that I explained that I would research before we moved and still all everyone did was lecture. I already know about the bads, that is part of the research I mentioned, what really need help with is the questions I asked, like do local doctor (private practice) and hospitals have a problem hiring non locals? I have already searched the boards and cannot find the answer. I do not really thing I need to lighten up, because I am a very upbeat person naturally but I feel that the subject of moving my family to an island 2,000 miles away should be taken seriously. Thank you all for the help, this is very important to me.

 
Posted : July 6, 2012 8:24 pm
(@the-oldtart)
Posts: 6523
Illustrious Member
 

..what really need help with is the questions I asked, like do local doctor (private practice) and hospitals have a problem hiring non locals?

A good percentage of the staff at the hospitals and in private practice physician's offices are "non-locals" so that answer would be yes.

 
Posted : July 6, 2012 8:42 pm
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