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Odd question maybe? Pool pump cost?

(@daveb722)
Posts: 798
Prominent Member
Topic starter
 

I searched, but didn't find anything, for those of you who have a pool, how much do you think it costs each month to operate your pool pump? Just looking at the financial impacts of most things we take for granted state side. Thanks.

 
Posted : July 1, 2015 11:57 am
(@vicanuck)
Posts: 2938
Famed Member
 

My pool pump is on a timer. I run it 4 times a day for half and hour each time. I estimate that costs me $25 per month.

When I bought my hot tub a few years ago, after looking at my pre and post install WAPA bills, I estimated my hot tub cost $60 per month is operate. I used it at least 3 - 4 evenings per week.

However, now we have solar panels and my WAPA bill is zero as we produce more than we consume so I'm not worried about the cost anymore.

 
Posted : July 1, 2015 3:41 pm
(@daveb722)
Posts: 798
Prominent Member
Topic starter
 

Thanks. I was looking at the solar option, what size unit did you get? I know everyone's needs are different. Just curious.

 
Posted : July 1, 2015 3:53 pm
(@SkysTheLimit)
Posts: 1914
Noble Member
 

Totally depends on the pump, size of pool which dictates how long it should run etc..
My old pump used 1200 watts while running. The new pump is a Pentair Intelliflow. It averages 300 watts at the speed I run it.

 
Posted : July 1, 2015 3:59 pm
(@vicanuck)
Posts: 2938
Famed Member
 

My solar system is a 7.5 kw system with 30 panels. On average, it produces about 40 kwh per day but we only on average use 27 kwh per day, so I'm giving WAPA plenty of frre juice. But, I'm looking at split AC systems with inverters to use more power.

 
Posted : July 1, 2015 7:31 pm
(@STXBob)
Posts: 2138
Noble Member
 

It'll cost less soon, because WAPA electric rates are dropping by 9 cents, from about 39 cents to about 30 cents per KWHr: http://viconsortium.com/virgin-islands-2/quick-note-public-service-commission-decreases-leac-from-now-through-december/

There’s a typo in the article. It says LEAC is lowering:
"from $0.0279991 to $0.0191321”
It should say:
“from $0.279991 to $0.191321”

 
Posted : July 1, 2015 8:01 pm
CruzanIron
(@cruzaniron)
Posts: 2534
Famed Member
 

It'll cost less soon, because WAPA electric rates are dropping by 9 cents, from about 39 cents to about 30 cents per KWHr: http://viconsortium.com/virgin-islands-2/quick-note-public-service-commission-decreases-leac-from-now-through-december/

There’s a typo in the article. It says LEAC is lowering:
"from $0.0279991 to $0.0191321”
It should say:
“from $0.279991 to $0.191321”

.

 
Posted : July 1, 2015 8:28 pm
 JE
(@je)
Posts: 320
Reputable Member
 

If you are just looking for a ballpark number, and are willing to make a few general but reasonable, assumptions, you can assume an average pool pump here has a 1 horsepower motor. A ballpark power consumption number is a 1 horsepower motor will use about 1 kilowatt of power per hour. My pool is approximately 10,000 gallons and I have run my 1 horsepower pool pump 5 hours a day for the past 13 years with no water quality issues, but obviously it can vary based on the size of your pool and filter. So based on these general assumptions and my actual pool pump use, I would estimate that my pump costs around $50 a month at the current WAPA residential rate of 32.1 cents per kilowatt (1 kw/hour x 5 hours x 31 days x .321 = $49.76).

http://www.viwapa.vi/Home.aspx

Your actual numbers will vary on whether your pump is 120 or 240 volts, the actual horsepower rating of your motor, and how many hours per day you run your pump. There are other factors that affect your pump's actual power usage, such as the power factor, but its just a ballpark estimate anyway.

 
Posted : July 2, 2015 12:40 am
(@daveb722)
Posts: 798
Prominent Member
Topic starter
 

Thanks again for all the information, truly appreciate it.

 
Posted : July 2, 2015 10:16 pm
(@jim_dandy)
Posts: 1057
Noble Member
 

If you are just looking for a ballpark number, and are willing to make a few general but reasonable, assumptions, you can assume an average pool pump here has a 1 horsepower motor. A ballpark power consumption number is a 1 horsepower motor will use about 1 kilowatt of power per hour. My pool is approximately 10,000 gallons and I have run my 1 horsepower pool pump 5 hours a day for the past 13 years with no water quality issues, but obviously it can vary based on the size of your pool and filter. So based on these general assumptions and my actual pool pump use, I would estimate that my pump costs around $50 a month at the current WAPA residential rate of 32.1 cents per kilowatt (1 kw/hour x 5 hours x 31 days x .321 = $49.76).

http://www.viwapa.vi/Home.aspx

Your actual numbers will vary on whether your pump is 120 or 240 volts, the actual horsepower rating of your motor, and how many hours per day you run your pump. There are other factors that affect your pump's actual power usage, such as the power factor, but its just a ballpark estimate anyway.

Actually using a conversion table 1 HP = 746 watts.

 
Posted : July 3, 2015 1:09 am
 JE
(@je)
Posts: 320
Reputable Member
 

The standard conversion for horsepower to watts does not take into consideration real world factors such as motor efficiency, pump shaft friction, and where the pump is operating on its performance curve. So the actual measured electrical usage of a typical single speed pool pump will be higher than the theoretical calculation using the motor nameplate data. The 1HP=1kw estimate attempts to compensate for these various factors and probably errs on the low side as well.

 
Posted : July 3, 2015 12:04 pm
(@rosesisland)
Posts: 703
Honorable Member
 

I moved back here three years ago. My first house had a very large pool and I had extremely high electric bills. Second house I leased had a much smaller pool and my bill went down very little. It was only my husband and me in first two houses and he is off island 6 months every year.

The third home we leased, we are sharing with another couple and our current pool is not much smaller than our first. But, even sharing a large home with another couple our bill went considerable way, way down. I know LEAC dropped but I'm talking hundreds of dollars! The difference a variable pool pump! That's it!

 
Posted : July 3, 2015 3:55 pm
(@SkysTheLimit)
Posts: 1914
Noble Member
 

I moved back here three years ago. My first house had a very large pool and I had extremely high electric bills. Second house I leased had a much smaller pool and my bill went down very little. It was only my husband and me in first two houses and he is off island 6 months every year.

The third home we leased, we are sharing with another couple and our current pool is not much smaller than our first. But, even sharing a large home with another couple our bill went considerable way, way down. I know LEAC dropped but I'm talking hundreds of dollars! The difference a variable pool pump! That's it!

Yup, Right here: http://www.pentairpool.com/products/pumps-inground-intelliflo-vs-svrs-variable-speed-pumps-76.htm

This explains the concept pretty well. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8YSsiLZoPs

 
Posted : July 3, 2015 6:20 pm
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