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So Cal Kid moving to VI

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chefnoah
(@chefnoah)
Trusted Member

Well adjusting to this culture will require breaking through a language barrier.

I'm not familiar w the dialect on St.Thomas, but on St.Croix it took me months to understand what my 60 year old co-worker was saying. I would ask her to repeat what she said because I didn't understand, and she would dictate it exactly the same. No attempt to slow it down or enunciate further. I just nodded most of the time.

Here's a website for a book that helps understand Crucian

What's the local chatter like on St.Thomas?

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Posted : March 14, 2011 5:40 pm
socalkid
(@socalkid)
Active Member

Hey quice, funny cause I just read your thread and yeah i get that haha. Im not planning on, "Good day! man those revolts sure were awesome! :D" the whole history discussion was really based on my studies on hospitality and got dragged out to be something its not. However, you have an interesting upbringing being a military brat. I spent a loooot of time on Camp Pendleton and I hate it, so I'm sorry haha. As far as leaving the country, I spend a lot of time in Mexico, although I know that's totally different from VI. And ya, let me know what you think if you accept. Just PM me. I'll be heading over there this Fall. Good luck with the (potential) move!

and NoOne, for sure. I love snorkeling and the beach, of course. Although I do need to get my diving licence, and not to sound like a baby, but I haven't yet honestly due to really bad ear problems. Hopefully they're better in warmer water or something. But Cousteau's the MAN! soooo legit....

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Topic starter Posted : March 14, 2011 5:44 pm
noOne
(@noOne)
Trusted Member

Learning the "pitter patter" of the language sounds interesting and I'm interested to see what you mean by that.

Well, here is a direct piece of advice for you: whenever someone says something to you that you can't reasonably understand, they are messing with you. Locals are perfectly capable of communicating in a way any English speaking person can understand. Keep that in mind.

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Posted : March 14, 2011 5:47 pm
socalkid
(@socalkid)
Active Member

Well adjusting to this culture will require breaking through a language barrier.

Thanks Chef, funny cause I was going through these terms and my best friends dad growing up was from Nigeria and he spoke very similar to this so I think I might be well off haha

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Topic starter Posted : March 14, 2011 5:50 pm
noOne
(@noOne)
Trusted Member

Well adjusting to this culture will require breaking through a language barrier.

I'm not familiar w the dialect on St.Thomas, but on St.Croix it took me months to understand what my 60 year old co-worker was saying. I would ask her to repeat what she said because I didn't understand, and she would dictate it exactly the same. No attempt to slow it down or enunciate further. I just nodded most of the time.

Here's a website for a book that helps understand Crucian

What's the local chatter like on St.Thomas?

I understand what you are saying. The experience of the older West Indians is not the same as the younger. I loved talking to old West Indians who felt they could talk to me freely 🙂

It really takes time to learn how the speech works.

//was chided for losing my accent after being away for 15+ years - I had to say it didn't fit in up in the States

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Posted : March 14, 2011 5:51 pm
socalkid
(@socalkid)
Active Member

noone: haha ok, I'll look out for that. I'm expecting to be messed with a little, and if I'm not, I'll have to leave. I wouldn't be able to tolerate it if eeeeveryone was extreeemly nice all the time haha

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Topic starter Posted : March 14, 2011 5:52 pm
guice
(@guice)
Advanced Member

Oh, you bloody islanders and your independently developed languages. Ya da gahn bust'in thins up'et. (and yes, that's real dialect in some DEEP rich south)

I loved working with the Kiwis and the languages differences. Crucian does appear to have a lot more differences, but there were enough between American English and the Queen's English to throw up an occasional "wha?!?" and have some good laughs.

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Posted : March 14, 2011 5:53 pm
noOne
(@noOne)
Trusted Member

Oh and as disgusting as it sounds, you have to try ox tail soup, and fungi.

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Posted : March 14, 2011 5:55 pm
guice
(@guice)
Advanced Member

I spent a loooot of time on Camp Pendleton and I hate it, so I'm sorry haha. As far as leaving the country, I spend a lot of time in Mexico, although I know that's totally different from VI.

Yeah, Mexico isn't a good gage for international life styles. Most places americans go to are pretty americanized as far as culture and people. The real culture shocks are going to places that don't have direct american influences, germany, france, italy, etc.

It seems your move will be a pretty big culture shock. So, best advice I can give you, as an internal traveler, be open minded and everything you do is *wrong!* The sooner you start bending over backwards to learn THEIR culture, the better and faster you'll fit in. Americans, at least overseas in foreign cultures, are arrogant assholes. And it's true. So. play the arrogant ass, *as a joke* but realize you are most likely the one that's wrong. lol

American, F* YEAH! Yeah. That IS how other countries see us. lol

*Edit damn grammar. Can never see errors preview ...

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Posted : March 14, 2011 6:01 pm
socalkid
(@socalkid)
Active Member

haha and that's exactly my tactic down in Mexico and it works awesomely. Especially with older women haha

and no, not disgusting. I tried menudo, cow stomach lining, and that was horrible. But as far as ox tail and fungi, I'm down haha. but what types of fungi are you talking about? Like mushrooms? haha I like those I guess, but if you're talking about something totally different I'm interested

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Topic starter Posted : March 14, 2011 6:13 pm
noOne
(@noOne)
Trusted Member

and no, not disgusting. I tried menudo, cow stomach lining, and that was horrible. But as far as ox tail and fungi, I'm down haha. but what types of fungi are you talking about? Like mushrooms? haha I like those I guess, but if you're talking about something totally different I'm interested

OK I'm going to shoot off the hip: fungi is cornmeal, okra, a bit of sugar and a bit of salt. Most people don't like okra (I do) but I didn't even know the dish had this in it when I tried it. It is really good...

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Posted : March 14, 2011 6:19 pm
socalkid
(@socalkid)
Active Member

I love OKRA! but that sounds better than mushrooms, way better.

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Topic starter Posted : March 14, 2011 6:22 pm
BeachcomberStt
(@BeachcomberStt)
Trusted Member

Oxtail soup/stew is delicious. I make it myself with peas and rice. Also, stewed chicken and beef. Fungi is yummy, too. Depending on what island they are from, their food is also slightly different.
One has to understand, because many West Indians are from different islands, their dialect is different and they have different slang words. Some also speak French patois. Different forms of Spanish depending where they are from. Close but still slightly different, they still can understand each other.

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Posted : March 14, 2011 6:25 pm
noOne
(@noOne)
Trusted Member

I tried menudo, cow stomach lining, and that was horrible. But as far as ox tail and fungi, I'm down

Heh, what is funny is I can't stand seafood. I spend more than my teenage years on a 32 square mile island, surrounded by ocean, and I hate seafood.

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Posted : March 14, 2011 6:29 pm
socalkid
(@socalkid)
Active Member

As far as the dialect goes, I'm becoming more and more interested to see what it is all like. It's funny because I feel like there's so many different types of people and dialects going on, on STT at least, that I won't be TOO noticeable? Just in a sense that I won't be singled out. And that's a good thing.

But WHAT?! I loooove seafood, mostly fish. I could fish and eat all day long if I could haha. I also have a lot fo family back east, MASS, so im constantly eating it over there too.

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Topic starter Posted : March 14, 2011 6:51 pm
noOne
(@noOne)
Trusted Member

As far as the dialect goes, I'm becoming more and more interested to see what it is all like. It's funny because I feel like there's so many different types of people and dialects going on, on STT at least, that I won't be TOO noticeable? Just in a sense that I won't be singled out. And that's a good thing.

You'll be a Continental. Up to 20,000 Continentals come to STT per day off the cruise ships alone, you will be exactly what you are. Keep in mind STT has a population of about 55,000.

But WHAT?! I loooove seafood, mostly fish. I could fish and eat all day long if I could haha. I also have a lot fo family back east, MASS, so im constantly eating it over there too.

Bah, I am a Pine Point boy born in Springfield, MA.

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Posted : March 14, 2011 6:59 pm
socalkid
(@socalkid)
Active Member

Oh nice, I get you. We're at Natick and Sandwich. But alright don't worry I'll keep in my that "I'm exactly what I am." haha I should just make a shirt that just says CONTINENTAL

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Topic starter Posted : March 14, 2011 7:09 pm
BeachcomberStt
(@BeachcomberStt)
Trusted Member

Cow stomach lining is tripe which is delicious.
Okra, yuck. Ok in fungi.
Also, have to try pelau, goat water, mutton, curred chicken/anything curried. Different kind of soups, tropical fruits and vegatables, and homemade tropical drinks like sorrel and soursop. (Non alcoholic) Ginger beer - a soda. Ginger wine (alcohol)
Will be a continental (yankee) always, even if you buy or rent for many many years, but after you get a driver's license and register to vote will be a resident, that is if they last, which many don't.

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Posted : March 14, 2011 7:21 pm
socalkid
(@socalkid)
Active Member

haha thats what I figured. whatever I get it.
But as far as all the food. Can't wait. I like drinks so that will be fun. But please, please tell me their curry is different than Indian curry... Guacala! And you're a warrior for liking tripe... Maybe its just the kind I had. Cause menudo only has the broth with onions and cilantro. I put it on some corn tortillas plain, although I don't know... not for me I guess.

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Topic starter Posted : March 14, 2011 7:30 pm
BeachcomberStt
(@BeachcomberStt)
Trusted Member

As far as I know West Indian curry is not as strong as East Indian curry. But that may just be my exprience. I do not like East Indian food. I have eaten tripe many ways.

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Posted : March 14, 2011 7:35 pm
East Ender
(@east-ender)
Expert

socal: One thing about exchange students- the "regular" UVI students may keep you a bit at arm's length. The exchangers have a reputation for being here for fun. For many, the grades they get here don't count in their GPA so they tend to party a bit more hardy. And believe me, you won't need that "Continental" T-shirt. It will be written on your forehead. 😉

guice: Remember that the USVI IS America.

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Posted : March 14, 2011 9:28 pm
socalkid
(@socalkid)
Active Member

Literally? haha, but I know, I was kidding, but good joke off of my joke. Anyways, interesting to know. I guess I distinguish the students abroad at my school the same way, so thanks for pointing that out. And hopefully what your saying is true cause that means: Work, pretend to study, play. and that = Awseomeperfect.

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Topic starter Posted : March 15, 2011 6:43 pm
vballplayer527
(@vballplayer527)
New Member

Hey So Cal Kid,

Are you attending UVI STT through the National Student Exchange (NSE) program? I went to Cal Poly Pomona and attended UVI STX through NSE and had a great time!

I'm not sure about STT, but at STX, everyone was very friendly and accepting, just as long as you are very respectable, open and patient. It is laid back there in comparison to Cali, so things move slower. When a student walks into class or any room, they greet everyone with a "Good Morning", "Good Afternoon", or "Good Night" (Good Night is used as a greeting, as opposed to using Good Evening.) I've seen people still greet the class if they're late, or they at least nod to the teacher and the students.

However, even though STT and STX are about 40 miles apart, the way they do things are a little bit different. Your NSE coordinator should brief you on their culture, just like mine did at STX.

Don't worry about being the only non-black person there, because there are actually faculty members and students who are not black. My most favorite teacher out there was a skinnier Col. Sanders look-alike. The Freshmen Coordinator at STX looked like he was of Italian descent from NJ or NY. BTW, I am Filipino, so I really stood out.

My only advice is just be friendly, open-minded, and patient. Many of the exchange students in my group did not adapt well, especially the ones that came from less-diverse areas (the areas where the majority were white). They complained about everything, like the food and the quality of the education. They didn't bother to make friends on campus, and only made friends to locals who were from the mainland (and apparently white). Those same people only cared about partying and were drunk a good 50% of the time. They would also stumble in the dorms drunk, which left a bad taste to the local students.

As for me, I adapted very well thanks to my LA upbringing. Also, the STX culture had some similarities to my Filipino culture, which made things easier.

I hope this helps!

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Posted : May 9, 2011 1:05 pm
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