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where to rent chainsaw and ladders

 
EngRMP
(@EngRMP)
Advanced Member

OK, can you guess... I'm a new landowner on STX.

I have this really beautiful lot, but it is incredibly (no, I mean incredibly) steep. I've been using Google Earth and topozone.com to investigate the steepness, but it's just not cutting it for me. So, I thought... hmmmm, on my next trip (maybe June) why don't I rent a chainsaw and 10ft ladder and cut a path through my lot so that I can at least walk through and "feel" the steepness. Then, I can place the ladder at various locations and see what the view might be.

I can't seem to find business listings in order to find a rental center for these types of tools. Can someone let me know if there is a directory online?

Also, if anyone has a better/different idea, I'd love to hear your thoughts:
- should I hire local folks to cut the path (spread the wealth a bit)? If so, any recommendations?
- I am paying a surveyor to measure and provide a topo map, but I still want a path to investigate the lot by foot anyway.

Thanks, in advance,
rmp

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Topic starter Posted : March 28, 2008 9:45 pm
Cody K
(@cody_k)
Advanced Member

I had my lot cut by Kevin Sloane of Boddhi Landscaping 340-643-2402 . It was a steep lot and he did it quickly and did a great job for a very reasonable price. I highly recommend him. A lot easier then renting a chainsaw and cutting it yourself.

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Posted : March 28, 2008 10:36 pm
trw
 trw
(@trw)
Expert

ace over at gallows bay

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Posted : March 28, 2008 10:41 pm
EngRMP
(@EngRMP)
Advanced Member

Hi Cody and trw,

Thanks much for the tip... sounds like a great idea.
I keep hearing these horror stories about hiring for work, and schedules just come and go... deadlines don't mean anything. Has that been your experience? If so, any strategies to deal with that. Here is my fear:
- I hire someone, and tell them when I'm coming. I check on them (politely) and they say, no problem, we'll get to it. I (plan my trip well in advance for work schedules) arrive and it's not done... I just wasted that trip.
- or, I hire someone and ask them to finish one month before I arrive. I arrive; they completed on time, and now it's grown back and I can't walk it!

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Topic starter Posted : March 28, 2008 10:44 pm
beachy
(@beachy)
Trusted Member

There are rental (tool) places in Gallows Bay and at Reliable Rentals--there used to be one going toward Sunny Isle also, but don't know if it is still there, and there might be more. BUT if you are going to clear your property using any type of motorized equipment, you need a PERMIT...better get used to it. If you just use a machete you don't need a permit.

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Posted : March 28, 2008 10:46 pm
Cody K
(@cody_k)
Advanced Member

I have never had a problem with Kevin. He has always showed up when he said he would and done what I asked him to. I have recommended him to others and they have been pleased. I think you will be happy with him. Call him and speak with him, see what you think.

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Posted : March 28, 2008 11:00 pm
Cody K
(@cody_k)
Advanced Member

Just wanted to ad, Kevin and his crew did the work with machetes and other hand tools no earth moving machines.

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Posted : March 28, 2008 11:02 pm
EngRMP
(@EngRMP)
Advanced Member

Hi Beachy,

Thanks for the permit info... whew, don't want to be on the "trouble list" right from the start... I might need those brownie points later, when I start the house building.

Cody, thanks for the feedback... extremely helpful.

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Topic starter Posted : March 28, 2008 11:30 pm
beachy
(@beachy)
Trusted Member

Cody K--your PM mailbox is full

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Posted : March 29, 2008 12:59 am
Cody K
(@cody_k)
Advanced Member

Thanks Beachy: I just emptied it!!

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Posted : March 29, 2008 10:32 am
Jim Dandy
(@jim_dandy)
Trusted Member

There is also another rental place on Hess Rd.

Jim

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Posted : March 29, 2008 4:59 pm
amanda4882
(@amanda4882)
Advanced Member

I need someone to clear my lot in Smith Bay. Any body have a recommendation?

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Posted : March 30, 2008 3:12 am
Ronnie
(@ronnie)
Trusted Member

Just a thought on clearing property and lots. Try to keep as many trees that you can. So often we see people strip the land bare of what's been growing there for eons, build a house then plant back trees and shrubs that take tons of water to keep going while mother nature was doing such a great job before. Just something to think about. Not all properties need to be stripped clean to build a house.

RL

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Posted : March 30, 2008 12:40 pm
EngRMP
(@EngRMP)
Advanced Member

Good point Ronnie,
Yes, I have no intention of removing any trees. In fact, the path that I want will end up being a walking path through the lot, even after the house is built. I want most of the trees and brush to slow the winds and rain water. Eventually, once I see how the Sun hits the various parts of the path, I might open up the path a bit, in places, to make sitting and planting areas.

So, I'm thinking a zig-zagging path that makes it's way up/down the steep slope while minimizing the steepness along the path, except at the switch-backs. I'm having a topographic survey done which will allow me to design this path properly. I'll get a Google Earth picture of the lot; overlay my path design and give that picture to the cutting crew. I'll instruct them to not cut anything over 2" diameter.

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Topic starter Posted : April 1, 2008 2:19 am
Alexandra
(@Alexandra)
Trusted Member

I was glad to read you were just wanting to trim some trees with the chainsaw. I had feared your request for a chainsaw and a ladder meant you had horrible upstairs neighbors you were going to do something about! 😉

Surveyors often cut swaths through a property and no permit is required. If you are having a surveyor do a topo, he will likely have to cut some pathways through multiple areas of the lot to do the job adequately.

You might just give DNPR a call to see if they have any objections to you cutting paths through your property without getting a formal permit to do so. I have seen many lots brush-hogged without permits and as long as they didn't denude the land down to bare dirt or do actual dirt moving/earth change, they didn't get fined for it. It was viewed as "mowing their lawn". If you have a forest on your lot, you may be in a different category than those with just brush and tan tan and tall grass to clear.

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Posted : April 1, 2008 11:43 pm
brandonc
(@brandonc)
Advanced Member

Thanks Alexandra! You just kinda answered my question... I was wanting to get my lot brush hogged of the 4 feet tall grass, so to be able to visualize the topography a little better. I was hoping to be able to get it done without to much paperwork.

Brandon

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Posted : April 2, 2008 2:49 am
EngRMP
(@EngRMP)
Advanced Member

Hi Alexandra,

No, shotguns are much quicker for neighbors! (*kidding!!*). My lot is surrounded by other one acre lots, and not too many neighbors yet. I met a few of the neighbors walking their dogs and driving to/from work... everyone seems very nice.

OK, I do need to start to get to know the regulatory folks... I'll look them up and give them a call.

Good point about the topo mappers. I'm guessing that I'll just have to wait until they're done to see how much damage they do. I doubt they can tell me ahead of time how much they intend to cut.

With my steep lot, I am very concerned about accidentally creating ruts for water by clearing brush and grasses. I want the path to be no more than 3-4 ft wide, and I want it to gradually climb the 100 ft of hillside (1:2 steepness). And I only want it cut to about 6" from ground. I think I'm OK if I don't remove or damage any root systems.

You've touched on another related subject. I enjoy doing landscaping, but I am by far no expert. I've been trying to find out (web searches) about the local flora and fauna. I'd like to know what I'm cutting and of course know if I'm handling poisonous plant material or not. Has anyone seen a good link to plant identification on STX?

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Topic starter Posted : April 2, 2008 12:04 pm
KLJ555
(@KLJ555)
Advanced Member

Hi,
I'm sorry, but I can't answer your landscaping question, but I wanted to pass on some advice we got. We also bought a lot to build on eventually and contacted a builder. He gave us really good advice and said you want to spend at least a year with your land, sitting on it at different times of the day and year. We found that to be very good advice and have completely revised our ideas about where we would locate the house due to the winds and sun. We are going to live here for at least a year before we build and we have changed our minds about a lot of things that we would have never imagined:

--Don't want the house oriented directly toward the west (our condo is and it's miserably hot in the summer)
--Don't need as much air conditioning as we thought, as long as there is good cross ventilation
--Don't need as much interior space--outdoor living is such a treat here (something we didn't get much of in the northeast)
--Don't need a huge kitchen, we grill a lot and our cooking seems to be much simpler here

I don't know if you'd have the same experience as us, but I thought I'd pass it on as food for thought. KJ

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Posted : April 2, 2008 12:27 pm
EngRMP
(@EngRMP)
Advanced Member

Hi KJ,

Wow, that is really good info. In fact that is such a great topic that I'll start a new post with it.

rmp

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Topic starter Posted : April 2, 2008 4:06 pm
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