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Meteor Showers  

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swans
(@swans)
Noble Member

Good evening everyone,

PERSEIDS:

The year's best meteor shower! (Space.com)

The Perseids are a skywatching highlight this month. This shower, which occurs when Earth plows through streams of debris shed over the years by Comet Swift-Tuttle, is widely regarded as the best of all the annual meteor displays in the Northern Hemisphere.

(While the Perseids peak toward the end of next week, you don't have to wait until those dates to observe them.!!!)

"You can start watching a week or more before the peak nights of August 11-12 and 12-13, assuming you have a dark sky," Bruce McClure noted at Earthsky.org. "The Perseid shower is known to rise gradually to a peak, then fall off rapidly afterwards. So as the nights pass in the week before the shower, the meteors will increase in number."

The Perseids, so named because they appear to emanate from the constellation Perseus, often exhibit peak meteor rates of 50 to 100 per hour. The shower is also known for its fireballs — meteors that shine at least as brightly as the planet Venus.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Some estimate that the best time to see the meteors are between the hours of 10:30 pm and 4:30 am. Their speed: 132,000mph!

Enjoy!
Swan

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Posted : August 3, 2013 12:54 am
AandA2VI
(@AandA2VI)
Noble Member

Thanks swans! Good to have ya back!

*** The views and opinions expressed in my posts are soley those of A&A2VI and other like minded islanders. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the majority or any/all contributors to this site. Have a GREAT DAY!

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 3, 2013 2:58 am
swans
(@swans)
Noble Member

Good evening everyone,

PERSEIDS:

The year's best meteor shower! (Space.com)

The Perseids are a skywatching highlight this month. This shower, which occurs when Earth plows through streams of debris shed over the years by Comet Swift-Tuttle, is widely regarded as the best of all the annual meteor displays in the Northern Hemisphere.

(While the Perseids peak toward the end of next week, you don't have to wait until those dates to observe them.!!!)

"You can start watching a week or more before the peak nights of August 11-12 and 12-13, assuming you have a dark sky," Bruce McClure noted at Earthsky.org. "The Perseid shower is known to rise gradually to a peak, then fall off rapidly afterwards. So as the nights pass in the week before the shower, the meteors will increase in number."

The Perseids, so named because they appear to emanate from the constellation Perseus, often exhibit peak meteor rates of 50 to 100 per hour. The shower is also known for its fireballs — meteors that shine at least as brightly as the planet Venus.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Some estimate that the best time to see the meteors are between the hours of 10:30 pm and 4:30 am. Their speed: 132,000mph!

Enjoy!
Swan

I would like to share NASA's video on Perseid.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zO83KP54YXs
Enjoy!

Thank you, AandA2VI: For your warm welcome.
Swan

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Posted : August 7, 2013 1:01 am
ChrisMI
(@ChrisMI)
Estimable Member

Thanks for sharing this!

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Posted : August 11, 2013 8:50 pm
LiquidFluoride
(@LiquidFluoride)
Noble Member

it was too cloudy lastnight for me to see anything on the west end of STX, anyone get some pictures?

There was a [URL="http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/abinazir/2011/06/15/what-are-chances-you-would-be-born/"]1: 400,000,000,000,000[/URL] chance of you being born: what have you done with your miraculous life today?

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Posted : August 12, 2013 2:43 pm
DanielB_STX
(@DanielB_STX)
Reputable Member

This photo was taken in Wiltshire...........beautiful

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picturegalleries/picturesoftheday/10239492/Pictures-of-the-day-13-August-2013.html?frame=2642227

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Posted : August 13, 2013 7:20 pm
swans
(@swans)
Noble Member

Good Evening Stargazers,

The Geminids Meteor Showers, which are known to rival all others with up to approximately 120 meteors/ hr., will peak at the end of this coming week from the evening of Dec.13th through dawn on Dec.14th. I have included a link from NASA which describes this year's coming meteor event. Hopefully the sky will be clear!
Enjoy!
Swan
http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/geminids.cfm

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Posted : December 8, 2013 3:12 am
swans
(@swans)
Noble Member

Good Evening Everyone (Island/ Mainland):

Space and NASA's reminder of the Geminid Meteor Shower tonight. I posted their link below.
Enjoy!
Swan

http://www.space.com/23953-geminid-meteor-shower-peak-webcasts.html

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Posted : December 13, 2013 11:36 pm
swans
(@swans)
Noble Member

Good Evening Skygazers:

"....The annual Lyrid meteor shower is active each year from about April 16 to 25. The short-lived peak of this shower usually lasts for less than a day. In 2014, the peak date will probably fall on April 22, with the greatest number of meteors falling during the few hours before dawn...."

Enjoy!
Swan
http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/earthskys-meteor-shower-guide

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Posted : April 15, 2014 9:42 pm
swans
(@swans)
Noble Member

This month, the Eta Aquarid meteor shower peaks before dawn on May 5th, 6th, and 7th (Mon., Tues., Wed.) after Midnight and before dawn. This is a great shower for the Southern Hemisphere! But all of Earth will see meteors, and the moon will be out of the way during the peak hours after midnight.

Watch in a dark sky, and expect 20 to 40 meteors per hour. The parent comet from which the Eta Aquarid Meteor Shower hails is Comet Halley; the meteor showers can be seen from April 19th through May 28th.
Enjoy, everyone!
Swan

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Posted : May 3, 2014 3:36 am
swans
(@swans)
Noble Member

Meteors anyone? Saturday morning, May 24th @ about 2:00am: Compliments of Jupiter!

"....Meteor experts have been working hard trying to determine just what Earth's interaction with the dusty debris of Comet 209P/LINEAR will produce. Predictions have ranged anywhere from 100 meteors per hour to perhaps a full-fledged meteor storm of 1,000 per hour...."

Swan
http://www.space.com/25927-new-meteor-shower-sizzle-or-fizzle.html

ReplyQuote
Posted : May 19, 2014 3:00 pm
LiquidFluoride
(@LiquidFluoride)
Noble Member

Ahh meteors,, little reminders that humanity could be wiped off the earth instantly, at any time.

Here's some good info on it:

Randall Carlson is a master builder and architectural designer, teacher, geometrician, geomythologist, geological explorer and renegade scholar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R31SXuFeX0A&list=PLk1Sqn_f33KuS7ZSVMJqzFaqOyyl-esmG&index=3

There was a [URL="http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/abinazir/2011/06/15/what-are-chances-you-would-be-born/"]1: 400,000,000,000,000[/URL] chance of you being born: what have you done with your miraculous life today?

ReplyQuote
Posted : May 19, 2014 6:26 pm
swans
(@swans)
Noble Member

Stargazers: Just a reminder of the meteor shower.
Enjoy!
Swan

http://www.space.com/25984-camelopardalids-meteor-shower-comet-viewing-preparations.html

ReplyQuote
Posted : May 23, 2014 2:04 pm
swans
(@swans)
Noble Member

For our Stargazers: Perseids returns:

The Perseids are back with a bang.

The 2014 Perseid meteor shower should be visible this weekend for skywatchers in the Northern Hemisphere. The annual celestial show, regarded as one of the most reliable meteor showers of the year, is expected to peak overnight between Aug. 12 and Aug. 13.

Appearing each July or August when the Earth passes near Comet Swift-Tuttle, the spectacular show emanates from the Perseus constellation, from which the shower derives its name.

Though the Perseids typically serve up about 100 shooting stars per hour, this year's show may be slightly obscured by the supermoon that occurs around the same time. A supermoon is a bit larger and brighter than a typical full moon, and this one is likely to be the biggest and brightest of the three to occur in 2014.

"This is bad news for the Perseids," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a written statement. "Lunar glare wipes out the black-velvety backdrop required to see faint meteors, and sharply reduces counts."

But skywatchers needn't fret, since shooting stars may still be visible about a week after the shower's peak early Wednesday morning.

For the best view of the shower, experts suggest going outside in the early morning, several hours after moonrise.

"The best time to see the showers will be at around 2 a.m.," Tony Berendsen, an outreach astronomer and founder of Tahoe Star Tours, told ABC News. "Because the moon will be incredibly bright in the earlier evening, the smaller showers will not be a match."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/08/perseid-meteor-shower-2014_n_5659648.html?utm_hp_ref=science

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Posted : August 8, 2014 11:24 pm
East Ender
(@East_Ender)
Islander

swans: I suspect the full moon is going to mess with our viewing ability. We once saw the Geminid shower sailing back from St Maarten. Everyone was on deck at 2am. The meteors were reflected in the water and it was a light show all around! Incredible.

What about the August star coral spawning event? More science...

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Posted : August 9, 2014 9:05 pm
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