One flew over the British Virgin Islands  

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wanderer
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This is the third installment in my "Living like a ..." series. My previous Caribbean adventures have been chronicled here:

Living like a Crucian:
https://www.vimovingcenter.com/talk/read.php?4,219260,page=1

Living like a St Johnian:
https://www.vimovingcenter.com/talk/read.php?7,238131,page=1

This time, I am spending a month in BVI (Feb 1st to March 2nd, 2016), with a home base in Tortola.

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wanderer
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Day 1 (continued)

In BVI, I feel hungry all the time. Not that there is shortage of food. It's just that right after I ate breakfast, I fantasized about lunch.

It's 6 pm now, and the popular restaurants do not open for dinner until 7 pm. I head to the "unpopular" one, which is open all the time, and doesn't appear to have any patrons. I enter and ask for a menu. They don't have one. It's a spontaneous kind of thing for them, type of "we serve whatever we catch during the day", although they didn't put it this way. Today, it's fish and chips:

While consuming this staple of the British diet, I observe the hostess. She is West Indian. Some people like to study animals, plants, machinery, religion, art. I like to study people. If I were not a software engineer, I'd be either a preacher or an anthropologist.

Certain anthropological patterns emerged so far. The West Indians in BVI, just like their counterparts in USVI, like their music loud. Deafening loud. Quite amazingly, West Indians in BVI just love talking on their cell phones while enjoying their music at the same time. To what can this seemingly superhuman ability be attributed to?

The dominant music preferences in BVI are somewhat different from those in USVI. It appears that in BVI, the melodic qualities are preferred over the rhythmic qualities. In USVI, it's the other way around. Even when rap is heard, the BVI selections are decidedly gentler than the USVI selections.

For example,
In USVI: "don't fuking disrespect me you fukng bitch, I'll fuk you in your fuking ass and slash your fuking throat"
In BVI: "Oh, babe, I so loved to fuk you in the ass last night"

So far, I have not heard any Adele, Beatles, Queen, Led Zeppelin, or Rolling Stones. Maybe tomorrow. Or maybe I am getting old.

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STTsailor
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Fascinating blog.
Looking forward to the next episode.

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wanderer
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Day 2.

In the British Virgin Islands, people are classified as British Overseas Territory Citizens (BOTS), BVIslanders, Belongers, and Non-Belongers.

In the United States, it's simply citizens and aliens. It all started with the movie "Alien", made by Ridley Scott and released in the U.S. in 1979. In the movie, a Mexican dude named Pedro crosses the U.S. border, and makes it all the way to Cape Canaveral, Florida. Once there, he manages to sneak and hide in a spaceship ready for take off. In the outer space, Pedro (the antagonist) impregnates a Caucasian American astronaut (the protagonist). Now there is a dilemma: what to do with the alien fetus? Pedro insists on carrying the pregnancy to full term. The spaceship control center in Houston respectfully disagrees. Well, you've probably watched the movie, so you know how the conflict is resolved.

The public antipathy towards aliens, initiated by the "Alien" movie, was reinforced recently by the world's famous astrophysicist, Stephen Hawking. Using some clever deduction, he derived an equation which indicated that any contact between humans and aliens is likely to be hostile:
http://www.livescience.com/52439-stephen-hawking-hostile-aliens.html

When there is a popular belief held by the public and supported by science, the politicians step in and capitalize. In 2015, Donald Trump offered the final solution to the alien crisis: build a giant wall along the US-Mexico border to prevent the aliens from sneaking into our spaceships.

I will come back to the topic of BOTS, BVIslanders, Belongers, and Non-Belongers later today.

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wanderer
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Day 2 (continued).

Yesterday, the sea was relaxed. The waves moved gently, in and out, in a metronome fashion. The sea sounded like the Calypso music: no tension, steady flow, no unexpected melodic jumps. On the days like this, the sea is receptive to the exchange of the spiritual currency. You give something to the sea, and the sea will give you something back.

Today, the character has changed. The sea sounds strained and tense. No more Calypso. It sounds like a Beethoven's symphony: dramatic, full of the dominant 7ths and the 6ths, restless, unpredictable. Today, the sea doesn't want to engage in the spiritual exchange. It wants to be left along. I pick up and leave the beach.

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swans
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For acoustic appreciation, enter Beethoven....

"....Today, the character has changed. The sea sounds strained and tense. No more Calypso. It sounds like a Beethoven's symphony: dramatic, full of the dominant 7ths and the 6ths, restless, unpredictable. Today, the sea doesn't want to engage in the spiritual exchange...."

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