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IHOP - $12,600 WAPA BILL FOR TWO WEEKS

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InnAtPelicanHeights
(@InnAtPelicanHeights)
Advanced Member

Had breakfast at IHOP Saturday AM, around 800AM--
service good, food good, prices good ---especially when you enter the building and they have a two week WAPA bill on display for $12,600 for two weeks in June 2011.

Thats allot of food to be serving just to pay WAPA, ie from my experience having a few restaurants in the states, I estimate to cover expenses; WAPA bill and all expenses(labor, food, waste, insurance and other utilities), IHOP Sales of almost $27,000 for a 14 day period. Simply put,

Sales of a little over $1,900 per day to break even

or

95 customers a day spending $20 on food and beverages

Now I understand why so many restaurants close and are up for sale.

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Topic starter Posted : September 10, 2011 7:41 pm
Linda J
(@Linda_J)
Expert

What I'd love to know is why stores and offices thinnk they need to keep the A/C on so high?? Even at a warmer setting, the A/C keeps the air dryer. I often walk into buildings and wish I had a sweater.

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Posted : September 10, 2011 9:34 pm
Juanita
(@Juanita)
Expert

Linda, I'll go way out on a limb here and say it's because most of the time a MAN is in charge! Often, maybe it's a LARGE man. Most men can't get too cold, when it comes to A/C. We live without it in our house, but when we get in the car, it's always a "discussion" about the temp., or when we stay in a hotel, holy cow!!!! I'm up 2 or 3 times turning it up.

Just one theory....;)

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Posted : September 10, 2011 9:52 pm
stxer
(@stxer)
Advanced Member

Linda, I'll go way out on a limb here and say it's because most of the time a MAN is in charge! Often, maybe it's a LARGE man. Most men can't get too cold, when it comes to A/C. We live without it in our house, but when we get in the car, it's always a "discussion" about the temp., or when we stay in a hotel, holy cow!!!! I'm up 2 or 3 times turning it up.

Just one theory....;)

In our household it is just the opposite. I don't even feel comfortable unless it is at least 80 degrees. We set our house ac so that it will not come on until it is almost 90, which seldom happens with fans and the breeze. My wife likes it cooler, but not like many of her older 'lady' friends who complain about being too hot all of the time and love the refrigerated air in commercial establishments.

I hate it when a business is too cold...anything below 80...I just leave...

I hope that IHOPs bill was a mistake. Does anyone know what is typical for a commercial WAPA bill.

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Posted : September 10, 2011 10:55 pm
onthespot
(@onthespot)
Advanced Member

I think it is because it is a franchse, and they are bound by an agreement to run it like all the other ones, including the inside temp range, which they peg at where most stateside people would feel relief if they went inside.

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Posted : September 11, 2011 12:10 am
Ronnie
(@ronnie)
Trusted Member

A two week WAPA bill? Thought they here were closer to a month?

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Posted : September 11, 2011 12:29 am
InnAtPelicanHeights
(@InnAtPelicanHeights)
Advanced Member

Ronnie, yes its a two week WAPA bill, feel free to go to IHOP and verify, the bill is display and will give you the information.

The bill is not a mistake, the previous amount on the bill was almost $9700.

And yes, AC is a factor. My guess, 30% of the bill is AC expense. As a franchise, Im sure IHOP has guidelines to follow, to include climate conditions for customers and mandated types of equipment, ie electrical.

Regardless, those of you who like going to IHOP enjoy , as in MY opinion, can't see IHOP lasting over the long haul with approximate $20,000 a month WAPA bill---or any other restaurant like Chiles, TGIF, Longhorn Steak House, etc.....------the type of restaurant being recruiting to co-exist with Home Depot---and according to the information I am told, type of franchise restaurant developer has been unable to secure.

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Topic starter Posted : September 11, 2011 10:12 am
sugarlander
(@sugarlander)
Advanced Member

The food really needs to fly out of IHOP to cover that kind of overhead. When you factor in food costs, rent, payroll, repairs, franchise fees, etc. I believe that break-even would be closer to $3K ++ per day.

I've read on this board that WAPA was the main reason that the Church's Chicken at 5 corners shut down. However, I have to believe that were other contributing factors..

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Posted : September 11, 2011 1:25 pm
Juanita
(@Juanita)
Expert

Didn't the owner of IHOP know about WAPA? That's the part I never understand. Seems like these new businesses think they will be exempt from the high cost of doing business here. I don't remember when IHOP opened, but 2 years ago, our wapa rate was over .50/kwh. Not like it's even been low. If I were opening a business today, I would count on wapa at much more than .50, and be pleasantly surprised if it didn't go there.

I agree with stxer. When it's too cold, we leave. That is one of the reasons we don't go to IHOP. FREEZING in there.

@ stxer...I know what you mean...I have a lady friend who is a cancer survivor. She is on that drug that causes SEVERE hot flashes. I spent a week with her recently in FL. OMGGGGG...The house was like ice!!

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Posted : September 11, 2011 1:37 pm
billd
(@billd)
Trusted Member

why not, our wapa bills are only 6 times the main land rate. But Mr overpaid HODGE is working for you.YES you. He may help us out and increase it to 7 times.

MR HODGE< YUU ALONE ARE KILLING BUSINESS IN THE VI! YOU!

billd

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Posted : September 11, 2011 5:27 pm
Neil
 Neil
(@Neil)
Trusted Member

IHOP killed itself with uneven food, frequently poor service, and a not always so clean setting.
We used to be a fan, but refuse to keep giving businesses "one more try" only to be let down all too often.
It's just pancakes and eggs.

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Posted : September 11, 2011 6:07 pm
Ronnie
(@ronnie)
Trusted Member

WAPA 50 kWh? I have figured ours to be around ,45. Nationwide average is .12. PR is .22 and they are complaining. What then should we do?

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Posted : September 12, 2011 11:42 pm
NugBlazer
(@NugBlazer)
Advanced Member

What I'd love to know is why stores and offices thinnk they need to keep the A/C on so high?? Even at a warmer setting, the A/C keeps the air dryer. I often walk into buildings and wish I had a sweater.

Tell me about it! Blockbuster Video in Golden Rock is sub friggin zero! Coldest place onisland, IMO. And, also, why do so many stores crank the AC, yet leave the doors open?? Many of the jewelry shops in C-sted do that.

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Posted : September 13, 2011 1:12 am
sugarlander
(@sugarlander)
Advanced Member

Average size of IHOP 10,000 - 20,000 sq. feet
Average size of Home Depot 130,000 sq. feet

I wonder what Home Depot's electric bill is going to be per month. $100K+++?

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Posted : September 13, 2011 12:40 pm
IslandHops
(@IslandHops)
Trusted Member

Rumor/plan is for Home Depot to have a ton of solar on the roof. Smart cookies.

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Posted : September 13, 2011 6:36 pm
SunnyCaribe
(@SunnyCaribe)
Advanced Member

I hope you all realize that the commercial rate for electricity is much higher than even the extortionate residential rate.

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Posted : September 14, 2011 1:30 am
Jules
(@Jules)
Trusted Member

RE jewelry stores with AC and doors open... they do that to entice shoppers to enter the store. Apparently people are more likely to wander in if the doors are open.

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Posted : September 14, 2011 10:15 am
stxrocks
(@stx_rocks)
Advanced Member

Regarding comment on STX Home Depot having large solar array... Today on the radio I heard an announcement that the Rohlson airport in STX had spent something like $2-3mm on a solar array that will save them $35K per month. Governor De Jongh talked about how going green will set a good example for our children. Guess when even the government (VIPA) decides WAPA is too expensive, us peon citizens should maybe wake up & listen? Had a chuckle over that one... LOL

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Posted : September 15, 2011 8:40 pm
STXBob
(@STXBob)
Trusted Member

stxrocks: Do you mean the Cyril E. King Airport on STT? They just installed a solar system. I haven't heard of solar at the STX airport.

http://stcroixsource.com/content/news/local-news/2011/09/14/governor-flips-switch-airports-solar-powered-system

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Posted : September 15, 2011 8:58 pm
sugarlander
(@sugarlander)
Advanced Member

Form the VI Daily News:

Island Dairies to close after 52 years; 25 jobs to be lost

When the dairy opened its new plant in Sion Farm in 1985, its monthly utility bill was about $6,000, Schuster said. Now, its monthly V.I. Water and Power Authority bill is about $25,000, he said.

Read more: http://virginislandsdailynews.com/news/island-dairies-to-close-after-52-years-25-jobs-to-be-lost-1.1204282#ixzz1YD1xye00

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Posted : September 17, 2011 11:43 am
STXBob
(@STXBob)
Trusted Member

With all the problems of doing business in the USVI mentioned in that article, we're lucky to have Island Dairies for as long as we did.

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Posted : September 17, 2011 12:24 pm
shdoug
(@shdoug)
Advanced Member

A comment on why buildings are so cold. I do A/C repairs, installations, and system design by trade.

So many times A/C systems are oversized here in the islands for various reasons. Most commonly, guys want to sell a bigger system and make more money, or they just don't know how to calculate the load.

But when systems are too large and the fan runs continuously such as in a commercial building, the compressor run time is too short to allow time for the coil to become saturated and remove sufficient amounts of humidity. When the compressor cycles off, all of the moisture on the coil evaporates back into the building. So businesses turn the setpoint down to keep the compressors running and keep the humidity down.

Humidity is a far greater factor than most people realize. When it gets above 55%, mold, spores, bacteria, and dust mites flourish. Over cooling the space to keep the humidity down is also a HUGE factor in the energy costs of a commercial building.

A/C and refrigeration equipment account for at least 50% of the electrical cost of a restaurant. I do not know what IHOP has for A/C equipment but I can almost guarantee with that kind of a WAPA bill something is dreadfully amiss. Another fast food place in STX (name withheld for privacy purposes) has a WAPA bill which is less than half that amount and their equipment is older, less efficient, and larger.

Building owners, make sure you are getting a load calc done when you get a new system. As a rule of thumb, commercial A/C equipment in STX should be around 1 ton per 250-300 square feet of top floor/single floor space with windows.

Residential, about 1 ton per 400 square feet unless you plan to leave your A/C off all day and then cool the house down in a hour. Then you need it much larger.

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Posted : September 22, 2011 1:44 am
stxrocks
(@stx_rocks)
Advanced Member

Yes, I meant the King airport on STT. My bad. Thanks for setting the record straight...

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Posted : September 22, 2011 2:41 am
Miguel Quinones
(@Miguel_Quinones)
New Member

I work for the Virgin Islands Energy Office and would like to bring some depth to the discussion. First, encompassed within the 60% fossil fuel consumption reduction goal by 2025, the Virgin Islands Energy Office emphasizes with business owners struggling to keep their doors open and has therefore developed a program in partnership with the Southeastern Energy Efficiency Alliance to provide grants to small businesses which are interested in reducing their electricity consumption. The USVI-WISE (Worthwhile Investments Save Energy) program is geared for WAPA customers with a monthly consumption of less than 30,000kWh and will provide grants for 40% of the energy conservation investments up to $80,000. The program flyer can be accessed at USVI-WISE Program Flyer and the application is available at USVI-WISE Program Application

IHOP is participating in the program and is currently going through the process. More information will be shared after the work is completed.

Additionally I would like to highlight several of the available incentives and ongoing initiatives that can help reduce electric consumption:

1. State Energy Appliance Replacement Rebate Program: a 30% rebate for the replacement of refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers, room air conditioners, and heat pumps. (The old equipment must be disposed of correctly)

2. Sunpower Loan Program: a no money down financing program for the installation of solar water heaters. The financing includes a rebate for up to $2,500 and 1% interest rate. The funds for this program are very limited due to the success of the program.

3. Renewable Energy Rebates: 50% rebates for renewable energy generation equipment up to $13,300 for pv panels, inverters, charge controllers, batteries, and wind turbines.

4. USVI-WISE: grants for local businesses (under 30,000 kWh/month) to cover 40% of the cost for the installation of energy conservation measures like super high efficiency air conditioning units, lighting, and more. The turn key program includes energy assessments, equipment installation, and quality control.

5. The Weatherization Assistance Program: designed to help low income residents by replacing their appliances to reduce their electric consumption and also install water conservation equipment.

6. The VI Energy Office is working with the DPNR's Division of Building and Permits to reduce the energy consumption of new buildings.

During the past few years the VI Energy Office has issued many grants, rebates, and loans for more efficient appliance purchases, building energy upgrades, more fuel efficient vehicles, solar water heaters, renewable energy equipment, and more to non for profit organizations, residential customers, small businesses, and government agencies (including WAPA) to reduce their energy consumption therefore reducing the amount of fuel burned sens LEAC.

A few days ago, WAPA announced that it received funding from the Department of Interior to create a Energy Services Unit, which would provide services like energy assessments, and other energy conservation services. WAPA is also working to install 10 MW of solar power in the territory, the largest installation in the Caribbean. The VI Government has also been working diligently on securing the funding for the grid interconnection with Puerto Rico which would improve reliability and lower energy costs.

In closing I would like to emphasize that the 60% fossil fuel consumption reduction goal by 2025, is tied to a road map of immediate, medium term, and long term initiatives. To date we have made significant progress, and by 2014 the VI should be getting close to the half way mark. The road map can be downloaded at EDIN-USVI Energy Roadmap. I would personally like to invite the members of this group to provide feedback on any of the current programs or any additional ideas.

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Posted : October 17, 2011 4:17 pm
bucnews@gmail.com
(@bucnews@gmail.com)
New Member

Actually, the St. Croix airport is also considering solar panels too. Your original remark does deserve consideration. When the Big Boys go to solar, who is going to foot the high costs of WAPA?

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Posted : October 17, 2011 6:21 pm
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