Tibbar Energy ????  

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Alana33
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A friend sent this to me:

"It's honestly hard to keep track of the half-baked plans that are spun and delivered to the various VI government programs and authorities for consideration. Given that one of the latest ones proposes to do one of the more non-sustainable things I can imagine in an island setting --- and is actually being seriously considered by the Port Authority --- I'd say this is good reason not to give the Port Authority yet more tax revenues (marine terminal taxes) to spend on these types of things.

The Port Authority is considering leasing 15 acres to Tibbar Energy --- a proposal that might be appropriately referred to as "Feed the Beast 2" (with "Feed the Beast 1" referring to Alpine Energy Group's now dead proposal). And the proposal appears to involve leasing another 400 acres to grow "Giant King Grass" to feed "the beast". And, they're contemplating needing even more than that 400 acres. But for now, let's look at how much energy that might theoretically produce.

Based on operating history / data for U.S. waste-to-energy projects (projects built by companies with actual experience in the industry), and information from the Giant King Grass marketing info. (VIASPACE)), each dry ton of Giant King Grass grown should be able to produce between 0.03 and 0.04 Megawatts of power. The VIASPACE website information suggests that in one years time, 400 acres should be able to produce 18,000 dry tons of Giant King Grass. Doing the math on energy production from that, 18,000 dry tons per year would only be enough to power a plant rated at between 1 and 2 Megawatts. Keep in mind that this is based on marketing information, so be assured these are optimal conditions and figures.

I'm wondering if the Port Authority ever considered leasing, or making available, even 200 acres (half of what's contemplated for this biomass project) for photovoltaic / solar companies to install ground-mounted solar arrays. (?) At about 1 Megawatt per 5 acres, based on actual solar projects, that would be about 40 Megawatts of power. If WAPA (or whomever their successor might be) would carry the power grid modernization and stabilization steps that experts have long been urging them to do along with energy storage systems, our local power costs would come down steeply, not to mention the favorable environmental benefits of producing clean energy.

Producing biofuel cost-effectively, even using the best of technologies and optimal biological / floral species, requires thousands of acres. And island settings like the USVI simply don't have the land mass to do that, and do things like produce locally grown foods cost-effectively so that food costs can come down; conserve and enhance local fresh water supplies; deploy ground and building-mounted solar arrays, which at current power costs in the VI have a payback period of only 3 years or so; etc.

I'd also love to see a listing of Tibbar Energy's, or Tibbar Construction Services, Inc.'s, already built energy projects. But I don't find that on their website. All I see are supply contract services for miscellaneous electrical services and supplies. At what point is the VI going to join the rest of the world in doing serious and credible vetting of potential contractors, and concepts?"

"So... Let's get this straight:"

"It was disclosed to the VI Water and Power Authority, and presumably also the VI Waste Management Authority, that the Vice President of Tibbar Energy, and husband of CEO Tania Tomyn Smith, was convicted of environmental crimes, bribery, RICO crimes, etc. etc., and went to prison for such. AND, now this company is leasing Port Authority land on the shores of the U.S. territory of the Virgin Islands."

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MissJustice
Posts: 548
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Message Remove: Please revisit board rules.

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gonetropo
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Joined: 8 years ago

Meanwhile, STX has hit the 5 MW limit for net metering. So no more net metering permits for the tax paying residents and business owners here on STX. Yet let's allow outside convicts open their renewable energy biz here and take away from solar / wind vendors.

Bruno, not according to the St. Croix Source! http://stcroixsource.com/content/news/local-news/2014/04/05/net-metering-nears-cap-st-croix

WAPA Executive Director Hugo Hodge gave the Source Friday following his testimony to the V.I. Senate’s Energy and Environmental Protection Committee, at which he told lawmakers the cap on St. Croix was “about four or 4.1 megawatts of the five."

The news came in response to concerns the Source was hearing from people involved in the solar industry that the cap may already have been reached. If that's true, people who sell and install alternative energy systems will lose a valuable incentive for marketing their services.

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Bruno
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Joined: 11 years ago

At DPNR on Friday, the total amount of on line( connected to the grid) , plus permits in place and applications totaled 5.6MW. Some of the permits were older then one year old. They will come off that 5.6 figure. Perhaps some applications will be returned, I don't know. What I do know, being in the biz for 31 yrs and at DPNR one or more times per week, is that we did hit the cap for Stx. It is still undecided if more will be added to STX grid or not. Lots of noice out right now. Senators need to stop the larger solar projects slated for this island, which will only benefit WAPA, and allow residents and business owners the opportunity to benefit.

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sunshinefun
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I'm not sure why it matters if we have hit the 5 MW cap. Does that mean folks can't install panels at all anymore? Or does it just mean that those that install panels can't net meter? Why is net metering important? I'm confused. Bruno?

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Alana33
Posts: 12153
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Joined: 7 years ago

For some reason, I can't PU radio station 93.5AM
Any other options to be able to listen in to this?
Sorry disregard the above - I see it's FM! My bad.

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